Category: Magazines

Voice Enhancer – New promotional interview for Sì

Voice Enhancer – New promotional interview for Sì

Hello people! A new promotional interiew to promote The Present and Sì Rose Signature


Cate Blanchett can be forgiven for not knowing that Drew Barrymore wants to eat her.

The two-time Oscar winning actress is currently appearing on Broadway in an adaptation of Chekhov’s “The Present,” and her schedule is punishing. The actress has nine performances weekly, each clocking in at almost three hours, which doesn’t leave much time to catch E News, where Barrymore, promoting her new Netflix series about a suburban mom who becomes a cannibal, proclaimed Blanchett to be the person she’d most like to eat “because she’s like the most amazing woman ever.”

Blanchett laughs a deep throaty laugh when she hears the story, and immediately gives the love right back. “She’s an angel, a very talented angel.” But the actress — who today is conducting interviews with international beauty editors in her role as the face of Giorgio Armani’s Si fragrance before heading to the theater for her evening performance — has been avidly following the political news during her time in New York.

In January, for example, she joined the The Ghostlight Project’s protest march on Broadway, wearing a pink knit “pussy” hat, and while she couldn’t attend the Women’s March on Washington because of her performance schedule (“I was there in spirit,” she says), she hasn’t been reticent about speaking her mind.

“When Elizabeth Warren is told that she can not speak in the Senate, they are dark days,” says Blanchett. “I don’t know what century I’m in. I thought that the equal pay for equal work conversation was boring and reactionary enough, but this is deeply shocking. We have the choice now to evolve as a species and part of that is finally getting rid of the shocking inequalities that exist not only between the genders but the wealth divide.”

Blanchett’s relationship with Armani has been a longstanding one — she likes to tell the story of running out to buy an Armani suit after getting her first acting paycheck and is quick to note that she still owns it (“his clothes don’t date”) — due in part to his espousal of gender equality. “He was one of the first designers to really unlock the complexity of the female aesthetic. He liberated women from the need to wear traditionally feminine clothes or traditionally sexy clothes,” says Blanchett. “There is a kind of Eastern simplicity, and also an Eastern mélange of the opposites that exist in his designs — you’ve got the masculine with the feminine and the soft with the hard.

“He is interested in all of those dualities,” she continues, “and when he was creating Si he wanted all of those complexities and dualities to exist.” It is a message that has resonated. Industry sources estimate that Si, which is currently launching its second flanker called Rose Signature, has reached retail sales of $80 million in the U.S. since launching in 2014.

Sitting in the Presidential Suite on the 53rd floor of the Mandarin Oriental Hotel, Blanchett, wearing a navy Armani trouser suit, has a commanding view of New York City and Central Park. When asked if she’s enjoyed working in New York, she gives a brief hesitation. “It’s very confronting at the moment, for sure, but it’s a great city,” she says.

While she’s performed in New York before, “The Present” marks her Broadway debut. As for what’s next to tick off on the bucket list? Blanchett reels off a list of directors she’d like to work with, including Thomas Ostermeier, Julian Rosefeldt (who directed her in the one-woman multiscreen film installation, “Manifesto”) and Andrea Arnold. “And I’d also like to finally get some chickens in my chicken coop,” she adds. “So there is a lot to do.”

via WWD

New photo of Cate Blanchett for Vogue Magazine #TheRow

New photo of Cate Blanchett for Vogue Magazine #TheRow

Cate Blanchett appears wearing The Row, the brand owned by Mary-Kate & Ashley Olsen, in a new photoshoot for Vogue Magazine. See the article and the photo by Annie Leibovitz below.

Cate Blanchett wearing The Row - Vogue Magazine

15 Iconic Female Designers on Where Fashion—and the World—Are Going

One feels luxuriously dressed in a calm, pure, and minimal way,” says Cate Blanchett, serene and soigné in a cashmere blanket coat from the label she’s lauding: The Row. Like Blanchett herself, The Row is synonymous with quality and a kind of independent synergy. Of course, she’s hardly the only fan: Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen’s customers are helping the eleven-year-old label claim the mantle of the wardrobe of our time in the same way that Donna Karan defined New York women’s essentials in the nineties.
Behind their international success, Mary-Kate and Ashley have always worked privately and mindfully, showing beautiful clothes their way, sans spectacle. In fact, they loathe fuss. But how did two former child stars—who just turned 30 this past June—become such connoisseurs of so many different women’s wardrobes? The twins are as succinct in their response as they are in their designs: “Continuity,” says Mary-Kate. “We are a trustworthy brand that really sells exactly what we say we’re selling.” Adds Ashley: “The only people we feel we need to answer to are our clients.”
They attribute their perfectionist resolve to having been given a voice at a very young age and having sat in many meetings with heads of the entertainment and finance industries, allowing both of them to hone their ability to decipher “the good influences versus the bad influences,” as Ashley puts it, while staying focused. “We own our brand. We don’t get pushed in any direction.”
With the exception of a few Italian knits, they manufacture all of their ready-to-wear in the United States. “That means a lot,” Mary-Kate says. “We’ve created at least 80 jobs.” Their elegant designs, by their very nature, challenge fast fashion.
As it turns out, the Olsens were ahead of their time in more than just style. In their April 2001 issue of Mary-Kate and Ashley magazine, they predicted Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign as part of a feature devoted to the question “When will we get our first female president, and who might it be?” Sixteen years later, their designs defy age and—even though they have just launched menswear—gender. “It’s more about respecting one another, whether you’re a female or a male or whatever,” says Mary-Kate. With the Women’s March on Washington then around the corner, she adds, “Women are not the only ones that feel this way—a lot of people feel it. The atmosphere around the entire globe is very interesting right now.”
“What’s going to happen tomorrow? Collectively, I feel everyone is asking that,” says Ashley, who’s made a positive attitude her goal of the year. “What we’ve built so far is pretty incredible. I would like to push that further—but also to be a little lighter on ourselves.”—Emma Elwick-Bates

via Vogue Magazine

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Six Questions for Cate Blanchett

Six Questions for Cate Blanchett

Hello everyone! New interview with Cate for T Magazine/ The New York Times Style Magazine and a new image from the campaign’s set. Enjoy!

Cate Blanchett for Sì Rose Signature Limited Edition 2017

The title of “The Present,” now playing on Broadway, is a clever one. The play takes place at a summer house in Russia on the occasion of a 40th birthday, and there are a few physical gifts in play — notably, a chess set and an antique gun. (The play is a Chekhov adaptation, so yes, both get used before the final curtain falls.) But it’s also concerned with the specters raised by “the present” as a concept, particularly in a group of friends with years of history between them: How does the past of each relationship impact how we might feel about it now? How much can we ever depend on the future?

The linchpin of the proceedings is the birthday girl, Anna, played by Cate Blanchett with wit, grace and physical deftness. She spends much of the play’s first half smiling in amusement, resolutely unruffled by the impassioned meltdowns of those around her, and much of its second half shouting and seducing and dancing on tables. During a busy time for Blanchett — in addition to the three-hour run of the play each night, she’s also the face of Armani’s Sì fragrance, which launches a new iteration of its Rose Signature scent next month — she answered a few questions for T.

When watching “The Present,” we get the impression that all of these characters are entrenched in ways of relating to each other, which then transform or explode as the play goes on. How did that back story take shape for you?

I think you’re absolutely right. The characters all want things from each other that they can’t deliver on; they’re all in love with the wrong person at the wrong time. A 40th birthday with a lot of alcohol and unresolved lust and longing is a very combustible set of circumstances. It was really exciting to work with people that I’ve worked with for a long time on this, because in Chekhov, not a lot happens, but everything happens. It’s all about time spent with each other.

Continue reading the main story
You’ve spent a long time with Anna by now — you were playing her when you were interviewed for an August 2015 T cover story. Are you still discovering new things about her and about this story as you continue to play it?

When you work with really playful, inventive, intelligent actors who are very open, as I’m having the great good fortune to do right now, I think it constantly opens up; and if the work is rich and deep, it’s a joy to return to it. We first performed it about 18 months ago, and then we had a hiatus and people went off and did other things, and then we came back together. We sort of collided with the past experience, but took it somewhere — not different, but somewhere deeper.

I don’t know if you’ve ever had that experience of driving home, and the route is exactly the same, but you’re preoccupied with something different, so you forget how you got here. On a good night, that’s the experience you have in the theater. People are always saying, “Oh, my god, it must be so tiring to do the same thing every night.” It’s the same journey, but you arrive there slightly differently depending on what other people do.

And also, I must say, performing to an American audience right now in the wake of the inauguration of the current administration, there’s whole layers of meaning — of moral compromise and uncertainty of the future and what is right, what is wrong — that have always been in the play, but because the audience brings that to bear, it’s shifted the play slightly, which has been really interesting.

How, as an actress, have you seen that borne out when you’re playing the part? Is it just a feeling in the air, is it that laugh lines are slightly different…?

As an actor on stage, the audience often thinks that they’re there to be entertained, but they’re a vital, active component of the evening. It’s not about laughter, necessarily; it’s quality of listening. Broadway audiences are so literate: They love theater, they love being told stories, they love a surprise. And that, coupled with the current — it’s not even a political climate, it’s like a moral climate — has meant that the play’s been attended to in a slightly different way.

I think we’re all so hyperaware of our relationships to the truth right now, and to our sense of objectivity, in every interaction we have throughout a day.

Language is incredibly powerful: the words we choose to use, and how we choose to use them. I remember ages ago, the word “evil” was purloined, and it’s been very bewildering to me watching the word “refugee” morph into the word “immigrant” morph into the word “terrorist” within the space of nine months. “Truth” is an immutable word: Something is true or it is not. Theater, actually, its currency is language.

You mentioned the inherent drama of a 40th birthday party that collects people from different stages in someone’s life. Do you think there’s anything specific about that time of life that is more likely to give rise to dramatic situations?

It’s very built up, that moment in a person’s life, the 40th. And I think for her, it’s compounded with the need or desire to move on and to take stock of where she’s at; and take what is useful and valuable and worthwhile from the past, and jettison that which is not as she moves into the future. There’s certain points in one’s life where one takes stock, and I think in an archetypical way, turning 40 is often that moment, but for many people it’s not. For many people it’s their mid-40s or their 50s or their 60s. It depends on the degree of maturation, I think, and self-awareness that the person has.

You’ve been a brand ambassador for Armani for some time — what were your first impressions of the new Sì fragrance? Are there any memories or emotions it evokes for you?

I think there’s a definite optimism in calling a fragrance Sì at the moment, particularly a female scent. We have to be positive and forward-looking, and we have to say yes to those things we believe in and yes to ourselves. When Mr. Armani spoke to me about being the face of the fragrance, I had no idea there were going to be so many iterations. I love a fragrance that has those deeper woody notes that develop so beautifully — but this has got a double rose. Normally, I’m not a fan of rose, but because the rose is green, and there’s a Turkish rose in there, which has a hint of orange to it, it’s actually really beautiful. It’s humorous and optimistic, which I think is a good way to start the day.

This interview has been edited and condensed.

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via T Magazine

Cate Blanchett on the cover of IN New York (and more interviews)

Cate Blanchett on the cover of IN New York (and more interviews)

Good afternoon! The first cover of 2017, for IN New York, the cover shot it’s from this photoshoot for Variety.




A new promotional interview for Sì Night Light, written in Italian and in English, for Posh Magazine.


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And three older magazines:

Cate Blanchett promotes Sì with Vogue Italy

Cate Blanchett promotes Sì with Vogue Italy

Hello everyone! Another promotional interview for Sì Night Light, this time Cate speaks with Vogue Italy about the fragrance, UNHCR and women.



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Cate Blanchett on the cover of Rhapsody Magazine

Cate Blanchett on the cover of Rhapsody Magazine

Hello everyone, brand new cover and photoshoot for Cate. She talks with United’s Rhapsody Magazine on The Present, theatre, her Broadway debut, Thor and her sons. Photos by Michele Aboud.





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Read online here or here. Thanks to the girls at the L Chat for the links

Cate Blanchett interview: InStyle Magazine December 2016

Hi everyone!

Recently, Cate Blanchett sat down with InStyle to talk about serving as a goodwill ambassador to the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees, overcoming high school insecurities, and learning to embrace fear. The interview is part of the I am that girl campaign supported by InStyle magazine . Enjoy the reading! #InnerStyle


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Cate Blanchett interviewed by Grazia Italy Magazine

Cate Blanchett interviewed by Grazia Italy Magazine

Hello everybody!

Cate Blanchett is featured in the new issue of Grazia Italia magazine. There is one new photo from the new Sì campaign for Giorgio Armani, shot by Tom Munro. Enjoy!


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Cate Blanchett interviewed by Marie Claire Italia – November 2016

Cate Blanchett interviewed by Marie Claire Italia – November 2016

Hello everyone!

New interview with Cate Blanchett for Marie Claire Italia! Enjoy the reading!

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Cate Blanchett on Ocean’s Eight, Thor: Ragnarok, Where’d You Go, Bernadette, playing Lucille Ball and her Broadway debut

Cate Blanchett on Ocean’s Eight, Thor: Ragnarok, Where’d You Go, Bernadette, playing Lucille Ball and her Broadway debut

Hello everyone!

Cate Blanchett spoke to Entertainement Weekly about her new projects including Ocean’s Eight, Thor: Ragnarok and Where’d You Go, Bernadette. Enjoy the interview!

Cate Blanchett has recently had what she describes as a very low-key time in her life. “I took a big chunk of time off to be with my family — we adopted our little girl — and it’s been a lovely, quiet year,” she says. We’re guessing that’s going to change because Blanchett is about to become very, very busy indeed.

She recently arrived in New York City to begin work on Ocean’s Eight (alongside Sandra Bullock, Anne Hathaway, Helena Bonham Carter, Sarah Paulson, Rihanna, Mindy Kaling, and Awkwafina), and from there will go directly into her Broadway debut starring alongside Richard Roxburgh in The Present, directed by John Crowley (Brooklyn). And that’s all before she gets to work on Where’d You Go, Bernadette, adapted from the 2012 best-selling and beloved Maria Semple novel with Richard Linklater directing, or to get her chance to play the great Lucille Ball in an authorized film — produced by Lucie Arnaz and Desi Arnaz Jr. — about Lucy and Desi Arnaz. Oh, and somewhere in there, she found time to shoot Thor: Ragnarok. We caught up with the two-time Oscar winner to discuss it all.

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: You are playing the bad guy in Thor, right?
CATE BLANCHETT: Yes, You get to a certain age and you don’t play the hero anymore. [Laughs] You play villains. Villains and drunks.

Co-star Mark Ruffalo has described your character, Hela, as “the worst of the worst.”
Did he say that? Well, he’s the greenest of the green! I didn’t get to work so much with Mark, unfortunately. But I did get to work with Chris [Hemsworth] and talk about delightful! He’s just absolutely fabulous. The whole thing was just a riot and fantastic fun. Did you see [director] Taika Waititi’s film, Hunt for the Wilderpeople? Or, What We Do in the Shadows? He’s just got such a sure hand. He’s wonderful — I’d eat him for breakfast if I could. He’s absolutely delicious. And he’s irreverent which is great because Marvel, at its best, has its tongue firmly in its cheek.

Chris Hemsworth is actually sort of a giant in person. It’s not just movie magic!
He is a big guy! But, you know, you get on the Avengers/Marvel bandwagon — they’re making so many of these behemoths at once — he doesn’t have any time to sort of get chubby. I do love Chris in these movies — he has that really playful side of him that he gets to truck out.

So you’re now in New York to start work on Ocean’s Eight, which we’re all very excited about.
I’m excited too. It’s going to be its own thing. [Producer] Steven Soderbergh will be all over it but [director] Gary Ross has been behind the scenes for all the previous ones and understands that universe. So this an interesting side step.

There’s not too much known about the plot of this film except that it involves a heist and the Met Gala. You’ve attended that gala in real life.
Yes, I chaired it with Nicolas Ghesquière and François-Henri Pinault in 2007. So I know it from that angle but this is an entirely different thing. It’s like giving a kid a camera on Christmas day and suddenly seeing things from their perspectives. The whole thing, the way it’s put together, it’s really smart and fun.

What can you tell us about your character?
Uh….I’m not sure. [Laughs] I probably shouldn’t go into too much detail but I play a long-time cohort. It feels fun. I must admit, I get excited about who is making it and who is in it, and then I want to be surprised by it.

It’s so great to have this powerhouse ensemble of women onscreen together.
Yes. There’s this really entrenched and lazy thinking that says there’s a certain demographic who watches films a certain way and that narratives have to reveal themselves — men should be at the core and women should be an objectified part of that process. It’s really deeply uncreative. It doesn’t produce anything interesting for men or women. It’s time to stop talking about these films as “female” projects, and just call them good and interesting projects, full stop.

And you basically go straight from filming into your play, The Present, right?
I think I finish on the Saturday and I’m in rehearsal on a Monday. [Laughs] We did this show last year in Sydney and we’re transferring it over here which is great. It’s from an almost broken fragment of a work of Chekhov’s that Andrew Upton [Blanchett’s husband] adapted.

It seems crazy that after all this time on stage, this is your Broadway debut.
We’ve come to New York a few times before — to BAM and Lincoln Center. It’s difficult because we were running the company [From 2008 to 2013, Blanchett and her husband Andrew Upton were co-CEOs and artistic directors of the Sydney Theatre Company] and had children and schools so it wasn’t possible to do a long run. Now that we’ve left the company, it’s a much more achievable. It’s exciting. It’s a whole different audience. And I’m really happy that the entire original cast is coming. And John Crowley is directing! We’ve been trying to work with him ever since we came through the door — he directed Brooklyn, which is so utterly heartbreaking. He’s great.

And then next year you’ll start on Where’d You Go, Bernadette?
Yes! It is such a tricky book to adapt, and there’s this internal detached perspective — the way the narrative folds in on itself. But they’ve done a really great job with it. We’re going to go next year, I think.

And finally, I want to know what’s going on with the Lucy and Desi Arnaz project you are attached to.
Lucie Arnaz has been incredibly, unbelievably generous. We met a few years ago and started talking about this and now Aaron Sorkin is in advanced talks to adapt her mother and father’s story. It’s incredible. I mean, you want to talk about astonishing women who have made a lasting impact? You walk onto a film set and you’ve got the female bathrooms called “Lucy” and the male bathrooms called “Desi.” [Laughs] She was the first female studio head, for goodness sake, and a mother and she broke all the rules and changed comedy and was this incredible actress. And then you’ve got this amazing love story between these two people. He’s Cuban and he’s younger than her.

I don’t think I realized he was younger.
Of course, we won’t be casting anyone younger than me. [Laughs] But really, it’s so great and Lucie Arnaz has been so amazing to give us the authorized version of her story. It’s an incredible act of trust.

I take it that I Love Lucy made it to Australia?
Oh god, yes. I think she was watched around the globe. I’ve watched them all. But of course, it’s one thing to watch as a fan and then it’s another to think about how to delve in. There’s so much there and it’s so rich. But it’s a lot to try and think about inhabiting that genius!

So when do you think you’ll be able to get it going?
As soon as possible! I’ve read a lot of films — and made a few — that have ended up being biopics. In the end, this has to be so much more than that. The directorial vision of it will be absolutely vital. It’s terrifying. But like all good things, it’s equally terrifying and exciting.

via EW

Cate Blanchett: scans of old magazines and interview for Elle Brazil July 2016

Hi everyone!

We recovered many old articles and interviews with Cate Blanchett from various countries. The latest among them is the interview for Elle Brazil July 2016 to promote Sì Le Parfum. Enjoy!

 


 

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We are aware that a lot of people save and repost our images without giving us the due credit. I’d like to remind all these people that we work hard to keep this site updated and with contents freely available. If this unrespectful behaviour persists, we’ll start tagging again all the photos, and not where the tag could be easily cut.

New magazine scans from Mexico and Russia

New magazine scans from Mexico and Russia

Hello everyone! New magazine scans from various coutries, enjoy the reading (if you can read Russian)!



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Cate Blanchett: new interview and old magazine scans

Hello everyone!

A new interview with Cate Blanchett is available on Marie Claire Australia November 2016. There is also a new promotional picture for Sì Le Parfum and we also recovered an old issue of Vanity Fair Italy. All the scans were added to our gallery. Enjoy!

Marie Claire Australia – November 2016



Vanity Fair Italy – May 4th, 2016



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F Magazine Scans

F Magazine Scans

Cate is featured on the October 12th issue of the Italian magazine F, here are scans, thanks to Nicole from RichardMadden.net.

 

We also recovered an old issue of Harper’s Bazaar Germany



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Old magazine scans and new photos

Old magazine scans and new photos

Hello folks! Today I’ve stumbled upon three old magazines and a new promotional picture for Sì Le Parfum. Enjoy the reading!



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To be honest the third magazine is not so very old, and it features a brand new image from Sì Le Parfum’s promotion and a different version of an known picture.



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