Posted on
Jul 27, 2013

Blue Jasmine Reviews

Blue Jasmine is out and it’s getting great reviews for Woody Allen and Cate Blanchett, here are some quotes, click the links to read the full reviews:

From Wall Street Journal:

“Blue Jasmine,” the filmmaker’s strongest work in many years, brings us full circle from enjoying Jasmine by deploring her to embracing her by understanding her—not as a victim, but as a tragic fool who has told so many lies to herself, never mind to others, that she has become the sum total of her pretenses and prevarications.

Los Angeles Times:

Yet for all of “Blue Jasmine’s” darkness, the movie is among the filmmaker’s most emotionally affecting. Allen is surprisingly sensitive in exposing Jasmine, one of those affluent New York sophisticates so easy to dislike. Even the melodrama attached to her new struggles — a suddenly empty bank account, a mindless job, no closet space — realities that frame everyday life for most women, is subtly calibrated to allow us to feel for her. And occasionally laugh at the absurdity of it all.

The New York Times:

What did Jasmine know, and when did she know it? These questions come to haunt “Blue Jasmine,” and as the past catches up with the present, they help drive this moving, sometimes funny film toward its shattering end. If at times Mr. Allen seems to be answering those questions by pulling the film in one direction even as Ms. Blanchett pulls it in another, this productive dissonance deepens the tension and stakes and, as with a climactic confrontation between Jasmine and Hal, can turn a raw scene into a revelation. This particular battle takes place in their living room, a mausoleumlike shrine to their wealth, painted green, where, against the color of money, they fight for their lives, frantically taking swings at each other without a thought to everyone else they are about to take down.

Posted on
Jun 9, 2013

The Maids Reviews

Cate’s latest play “The Maids” has just opened and it’s getting great reviews:

From: TheAustralian.co.au:

TO bring together two actors of such greatness is wonderful but to bring them together in such a play as this is brilliant. Genet’s unsettling 1947 existentialist drama about two maids, Claire (Cate Blanchett) and Solange (Isabelle Huppert), who play out their fantasies of abjection and domination, is full of layers.

In their little acted-out “ceremony”, Claire plays Madame and Solange plays Claire (at least this time) but the theatrical levels are always shifting, flickering back and forth between different realities that are, in the end, all performances, like the theatre and like our lives.

And there is the fact that we are watching Blanchett and Huppert in magnificent, tour-de-force performances. They are celebrities as well as great actors and this layer – just watching them strut their stuff – becomes part of the fabric of the production. Add Elizabeth Debicki (who played Jordan Baker in the recent film The Great Gatsby) as an almost offensively young, beautiful, stupid and cruel Madame and we see Genet’s squalid drama of dreams and play-acting lifted into a different realm.

From Guardian.co.uk

Andrews’ longtime collaborator Cate Blanchett is in stunning form as Claire, picking up every nuance and flying through her character’s more difficult turns with skill and grace. Isabelle Huppert delivers a strong, textured and playful performance, but doesn’t bring the same kind of refinement and depth as Blanchett. Her diction is mostly clear, but as the play is so language-based, she struggles to keep up with Blanchett who conveys the intention and subtext of every single word in the script.