More Cate Blanchett Voice Works
Posted on
Jun 22, 2022

More Cate Blanchett Voice Works

Hi, everyone!

Cate has been attached to more voice works recently. She has a voice part in Julian Rosefeldt’s most recent film installation — Euphoria. She voiced a talking and singing tiger in a supermarket. Paul Feig has also said that Cate is the narrator in Netflix’ adaptation of The School for Good and Evil.

EUPHORIA IS THE LONG-AWAITED, NEW, MULTI-DISCIPLINARY, SPATIAL FILM INSTALLATION BY THE VIDEO ARTIST AND FILM-MAKER JULIAN ROSEFELDT, WHO WOWED RUHRTRIENNALE AUDIENCES IN 2016 WITH MANIFESTO.

His new work is a tour de force that runs through the history of economic theory. The project consists of original texts from famous economists, writers, philosophers and poets, and traces the 2,000-year history of human greed. He translates the complex history of the development of our neoliberal market economy into an accessible visual language through the combination of historical texts with familiar scenic representations, in which actors like Giancarlo Esposito and Virginia Newcomb appear as contemporary characters and Cate Blanchett provides the voice for a talking, singing tiger. The project pursues the question of why capitalism appears, until now, to have no alternative and why it remains irresistible, even to people who are aware of its destructive nature, as a filmic re-enactment of both pro-capitalist and capitalist-critical positions.

Euphoria is part of Ruhrtriannale Festival (Germany) running from August 26th – September 10th 2022. More info on tickets here. It will also be shown at Park Avenue Armory in New York from November 29th 2022 until January 8th 2023 (tickets here.)

Cate Blanchett Cast as Narrator in The School for Good and Evil

 Cate Blanchett has joined the cast of Netflix’s fantasy film “The School for Good and Evil,” alongside stars Kerry Washington, Charlize Theron and Michelle Yeoh, filmmaker Paul Feig said during a conversation at the 6th Annual Women in Entertainment Summit in Los Angeles.

And actually, we just got Cate Blanchett as now the narrator, so we’re very excited about that,” Feig let slip during the fireside chat, as he listed out the star-studded female-led ensemble. “It hasn’t actually been announced yet — it’s out there.”

The Netflix Original, based on Soman Chainani’s bestselling book series, follows the relationship between two best friends, Sophie (Sophia Anne Caruso) and Agatha (Sofia Wylie) as they are swept into a fairy tale-like world. However, the girls are soon separated, as Sophie is placed under Lady Lesso’s (Theron) tutelage in the School for Evil, while Agatha is taken in by Professor Dovey (Kerry Washington) in the School for Good. The plot centers on their fight to return to each other and adventures in mystical environments.

Sources: Broadway World, Ruhrtriannale, Park Avenue Armory, The Wrap

 

Disclaimer Update & Not Now, Not Ever Book
Posted on
Jun 14, 2022

Disclaimer Update & Not Now, Not Ever Book

Hi, everyone! It has been slow news day as we await for release of Cate’s projects this year and other news — according to Screen Daily the AppleTV+ series, Disclaimer, is still filming in London. On a more recent news, former Prime Minister (Australia) Julia Gillard is releasing a new book which would have a contribution from Cate and other feminist figures.

Disclaimer

Leslie Manville was recently announced as part of the cast of the 7-episode AppleTV+ series. Italian newspaper, il Fatto Quotidiano, is reporting that two episodes of the series will be filmed at Forte dei Marmi in Tuscany, Italy.

Here’s the list of characters the announced cast will be playing in the series:

Cate Blanchett – Catherine Ravenscroft; a successful and respected television documentary journalist whose work has been built on revealing the concealed transgressions of long-respected institutions.

Kevin Kline – Stephen Brigstocke; a widower who wrote an intriguing novel that was sent to Catherine Ravenscroft which reveals a story she had hoped was long buried in the past.

Sacha Baron Cohen – Robert Ravenscroft; Catherine’s husband who is a lawyer (role is not confirmed yet).

Kodi Smit-McPhee – Nicholas Ravenscroft; Catherine and Robert’s son (role is not confirmed yet).

Hoyeon Jung – Kim; Catherine’s assistant who is ambitious, hardworking and eager-to-please, she knows that working for Catherine is going to be her big break.

Louis Partridge – Jonathan Brigstocke; a teenager on his gap year traveling through Italy who allows himself to give in to his deeper desires with unexpected consequences.

Lesley Manville – Nancy Brigstocke, a woman devastated by her young son’s untimely death. Her life has been defined by her grief, and she lives a quiet life with her husband, Stephen.

Not Now, Not Ever Book

Julia Gillard has just announced her explosive new book Not Now, Not Ever set for release this year on 5 October 2022.

Ten years on from her famous Misogyny Speech, Gillard’s new book explores the history and culture of misogyny, while laying out a roadmap for the future. While the past ten years have undeniably seen many changes – and improvements – there is still a long way to go.

With contributions from several authors and experts, the book explores the reality of misogyny in 2022 and provides a look back at how the Misogyny Speech has inspired women since 2012.

With plenty to explore, the book is a well-rounded and highly-anticipated read for anyone hoping to understand the effects of misogyny on modern society. Kathy Lette looks into how the speech has resurfaced on TikTok, while Cate Blanchett, Brittany Higgins and more recall their first time hearing it. Next-generation feminists Sally Scales, Chanel Contos, and Caitlin Figuerado provide inspiring insight, and of course, the echoes of the rallying cry ring through each page: Not now, not ever!

Sources: ScreenDaily; il Fatto Quotidiano; Penguin Books; Variety

Happy Birthday, Cate Blanchett! – Mass Update 2022
Posted on
May 14, 2022

Happy Birthday, Cate Blanchett! – Mass Update 2022

Today is the day! HAPPY BIRTHDAY, CATE BLANCHETT! We wish that she have a healthy life and continuous success in her career.

In our own little way of celebrating Cate’s birthday, it has been a tradition of the Cate Blanchett Fan team to have a mass gallery update, which aims to make as many photos as possible available to everyone. We have updated some low quality to middle/high quality photos and uploaded additional photos from events, movies, photoshoots, magazine scans.

This fansite is run for free by Cate fans but every year we also have to renew the host in order to keep the site open. This costs US$300 and the deadline is in August this year. We hope that you can support the site by donating — any amount is deeply appreciated. You can click on the donate button below or on the left side bar (when viewed on desktop).

Enjoy the update!

           Donate button

   or by using       the QR code

Greg Williams has shared the colored version of some photos taking during 2022 Screen Actors Guild Awards. Nicola Clarke, who is Cate’s hair stylist and friend also shared a video with some never before seen photos towards the end of the video.

Stateless wins at Screen Producers Australia Award; & New Magazine Scan
Posted on
Mar 30, 2022

Stateless wins at Screen Producers Australia Award; & New Magazine Scan

Hi, everyone!

Slow news day on Cate but Stateless won at this year’s (SPA) Screen Producers Australia’s Award. Stateless is based on the idea by Cate, she is a co-creator and co-executive producer on the series. The series is available to stream on Netflix (outside Australia). There’s also a new magazine scan from Palace Scope.

Screen Producers Australia Awards 2022 Winners

“Every year, the SPA Awards are an acknowledgement of Australian screen industry excellence, uplifting diverse, locally-made productions with cultural impact and worldwide reach. Alongside the Queensland Government as Principal Partners, Screen Queensland is proud to have brought Screen Forever back to the Gold Coast — a globally renowned screen industry hub and a dazzling setting for tonight’s celebrations,” said Screen Queensland CEO Kylie Munnich.

“SPA members continuously raise the global bar for creativity and skillful producing, and tonight that talent was on full show. The task at hand is storytelling, and the winners of our 2022 Awards take this task seriously. They understand the significance of their work and the contribution it makes to the Australian economy, generating jobs for local creatives, and showcasing Australia and its unique heritage to millions around the world,” said SPA CEO Matthew Deaner.

Telemovie or Mini-Series Production of the Year (Tie)
• A Sunburnt Christmas – Every Cloud Productions
• Alice-Miranda Friends Forever – SLR Productions
• Hungry Ghosts – Matchbox Pictures
• Operation Buffalo – Porchlight Films
Stateless – Matchbox Pictures
• The Gloaming – The Two Jons
• The Secrets She Keeps – Lingo Pictures
• The Unusual Suspects – Aquarius Films

Palace Scope – March 23rd 2022

Source: TVTonight

Interviews and Magazine Scans
Posted on
Mar 12, 2022

Interviews and Magazine Scans

Hi, Blanchetters!

Cate has shown her support for flood appeal telethon to help those who have been devastated by the flooding in Queensland and New South Wales, Australia. She has also given interviews to Variety and Io Donna plus a podcast interview which can be listened on Amazon Music for free and will be available on Apple and Spotify on March 14th. We’ve also added some magazine scans from the recent releases.

 

Video link

In a rare move, tonight Seven Network, Nine Network and Network 10 will jointly present Australia Unites: Red Cross Flood Appeal to help the people and communities who have suffered from the devastating floods across Queensland and New South Wales.

All of the funds raised during the Telethon will go to people affected by the floods.

Kym Pfitzner, Australian Red Cross CEO, said: “Red Cross is delighted and grateful to join with the major TV networks to raise money for flood-affected areas. We have all seen the enormity of the flood damage across large parts of New South Wales and Queensland, and these communities now face a long and tough road to recovery.

“Everyone coming together during this telethon will help Australian Red Cross provide financial assistance to people at a time when they really need it.

“We can only give out what we raise, so we ask everyone to dig deep and really come together to support the people who have lost so much.”Whenever disaster strikes, Australian Red Cross works side by side with organisations such as the St Vincent de Paul Society, The Salvation Army, Lifeline, and GIVIT to get help to where it’s needed most. They do an incredible job and the Red Cross is grateful to work alongside all of them.”

Donations to the Telethon will help Red Cross teams provide humanitarian support to people and communities smashed by the floods, which may include:

  • Enabling volunteers and staff to help with evacuation and relief centres and outreach services
  • Supporting people and communities to recover and build resilience to disasters

So far, 468 Red Cross emergency response team members and volunteers have provided support in 49 evacuation centres – and donations help to make that support possible.

Apart from the Telethon, Australian Red Cross has already launched a flood appeal. You can donate to it now at redcross.org.au/floodsappeal or by calling 1800 733 276.

Tonight’s Telethon will also be highlighting the great work from organisations such as the Foodbank, Rotary, Good Food 360, Koori Mail Flood Appeal, and Rural Aid.

7:30pm AEDT tonight on Seven, Nine and 10 (7plus, 9Now, 10Play)*
* check local guides.

This is a Google translated interview

Cate Blanchett: “The time has come to banish fears and face reality”

Oscar-winning actress, Cate Blanchett, just made two films about greed and selfishness. But she is preparing to celebrate “what unites us”. She is ironic and a bit philosophical, for the directors she has the energy of “a 12-year-old bad boy”. And here she tells us how she faces life on this complicated planet every day.

Six in the morning in Los Angeles, early afternoon in England: Cate Blanchett calls me from her “manor”, the manor house in East Sussex – once home to Sherlock Holmes creator Arthur Conan Doyle – where she lives with her children Dashiell, 20 years old , Roman, 17, Ignatius, 13, little Edith of 7 and husband Andrew Upton. We have had several encounters in recent years, in person, on the phone, during photo shoots or at international festivals, and they have been promptly animated: we discuss cinema, the conditions of immigrants, refugees (she produced the TV series Stateless) and women’s wage equality, with some ironic allusion to our respective roles in Hollywood as well.

In short, each of her films becomes a reason or an excuse to pick up the thread of our discussion: “What’s new in this world of ours? Is it possible to participate, to make it better for us and for future generations?”. I have always spoken with Blanchett as if she were a guru, an enlightened soul: her interests range in the most diverse fields, from art to history, to economics. She is informed and curious, but she is also generous and helpful, she knows how to manage fame and success with completely unusual naturalness and spirit.

As an eclectic and courageous actress perhaps, the most acclaimed and coveted on the current international scene – she has never lost the pleasure of having fun and playing with even the slightest tones : she is there to comment on the color of my socks or the cut of a jacket, to indicate as icons of style Iris Apfel, the famous American interior designer who has passed the century of age, and Fran Lebowitz, the 70-year-old writer to whom Martin Scorsese has dedicated two works. She says: “Please remind me of the name of that extraordinary restaurant in Turin…” and then she cites the latest essay by a sociologist, that of a physicist expert on climate and the talk of an economist who studies mathematical models of productivity and wages.

The tone of the conversation today is calm, thoughtful, reflective. Two years of Covid also leave their mark on an incurable optimist like her. We have just seen the Oscar-winning actress in two films, Nightmare Alley, film noir with Bradley Cooper directed by Guillermo del Toro, and Don’t Look Up, a catastrophic-political-ecological satire directed by Adam McKay. In the coming months we will see her in Tár, the story of the first female German conductor, Pinocchio, the animated film directed by del Toro, and Borderlands, based on the popular video game. A few days ago, the news came that the director Alfonso Cuaròn managed to grab her for his first series for Apple, Disclaimer, with Kevin Kline.

Good morning Cate. The last time we spoke we were at the beginning of the pandemic, singing on the balconies and switching from one zoom to another with friends and family. Today, after two years of forced isolation, we are all a little tired, empty. How can we find ourselves? What to rely on, who to rely on to recover strength, hope and face the world? Art and creativity have been a healthy refuge for many…

I feel exactly this emotions and feelings. But I don’t think we can tell stories, read books, listen to music or walk down the street and walk in a park without thinking about what happened, and it’s still happening in a global sense. Even if you don’t make a film about the pandemic, that’s the thing we talk about or keep quiet about. I believe the time has come to put it out of mind and celebrate what unites us. It is interesting, however, that my last two films, Nightmare Alley and Don’t Look Up, instead tell precisely what separates us from one another.

Meaning what?

Both speak of our spiritual dryness, greed, selfishness, and the need to believe our own lies. In the case of Nightmare Alley, then, there is a very strong desire to ignore the truth. My truth? Let’s focus instead on what unites us, otherwise everything becomes only debilitating, tiring, exhausting. Because life is exhausting.

We generally find relief in movies, in stories.

Yes, many have taken refuge in cinema and books, especially during the first months of the pandemic, but now I want to face reality. I found myself reflecting on what is important and what is not, what is broken and what must be resolved, on a personal and systemic level. We are not only experiencing the reality of the pandemic, there are other relevant movements for which we should move and intervene. Having said that, I am also convinced that films, in a period like the one we are experiencing, offer the possibility of reading and understanding reality better.

Cinema as therapy?

Of course, to recharge and forget our worries for a while, but above all to communicate with each other. If you think of the films of 1945, and after the Second World War, you find great works of art that helped to process terrible catastrophes and crises. A film like Nightmare Alley, it forces you to reflect on what it means to be corrupt: you see a man who does not respect any rules, shows no empathy or compassion of any kind and a weak social system that allows him to get away with it. Just recently I read in The Guardian an article that, to report the growth in wealth of the richest men in the world as a percentage, cited a billionaire whose wealth had increased by 1006 percent in the last 12 months, that is, by 1.3 billion a day. A financial disparity of this kind is impossible to digest, not even the most amazing film can make you forget it.

You are active in various social and environmental organizations. You now collaborate with activist Danny Kennedy on the Climate Change podcast, on Amazon. Is the climate issue the most urgent problem to face and solve today?

Ours is a complicated planet, isn’t it? Everything is connected, but what is striking in the world, everywhere, is the disproportionate number of refugees due to the climate and certain political realities, and this will have a ripple effect. Insisting on protecting borders is pure folly: we need an international strategy that allows us to work together. This is my answer.

Don’t you think that the world, on the other hand, is closing up and not opening up to others?

Violence is perhaps more active, but it is motivated by fear, and fear takes shape and action when the truth has flown away. I think of Bradley Cooper’s character in Nightmare Alley and what happens to those who lose the sense of who he is, to situations without any underlying truth. Lies never got the human race anywhere.

You have three teenage children. How do you deal with these issues with them?

Bits and bits, sometimes with deeper conversations, often with brief hints. Taking it for granted that everything is working well doesn’t lead to substantial changes, but at the same time you can’t get caught up in the mud. You have to give yourself a move and move forward, with attention, respect for others, and never forgetting the sense of humor. Whatever your ideology or religion, what matters is to be human, tolerant and humble.

Immediately after Nightmare Alley you wanted to work with Guillermo del Toro again.

Yes, yes, I’ll be one of the voices in his version of Pinocchio, a monkey actually (laughs). One day on the set I ask him: «When is it that we will work together again, Guillermo?». “I don’t know, now I’m doing Pinocchio” … then he looks at the producer, Miles, and blurts out: “That monkey, for example… You know what, Cate, everyone has this idea of you as a great lady when in reality you are a rascal, a dirty, cheeky 12-year-old bad boy! ” Yes, you see, he is someone who knows me well (laughs). I ended up in his next movie for this reason, probably (winks).

What else can you tell us about Guillermo?

If Guillermo asks me to work with him, I don’t hesitate for a moment: in common we have the same love for horror, and a sort of obsession for the human animal, its unpleasant and sublime complexity. Besides, he has crazy, fantastic ideas, nothing is too much for him and he keeps a flawless sense of history. In short: his is a truly stimulating space in which to work, not counting the actors and the cast that he brings together. But do you know that thanks to him I was able to work twice with Ron Perlman? (legendary American actor, favorite of John Frankenheimer and Joe Dante, ed).

How Cate Blanchett’s Dirty Films Production Company Is Making a Global Impact

Cate Blanchett, who recently appeared front of the camera in “Don’t Look Up” and “Nightmare Alley,” has been busy behind the scenes developing film and TV projects through the Dirty Films banner she co-founded with her husband, Andrew Upton.

Among those in the works: “A Manual for Cleaning Women,” her first collaboration with Pedro Almodóvar in his English-language debut; Indigenous Australian filmmaker Warwick Thornton’s “The New Boy”; and the Apple TV Plus series “Disclaimer” from Alfonso Cuarón.

Blanchett will star in each in addition to producing, building on her résumé of dual credits that includes “Carol,” “Stateless” and “Mrs. America.” Similar to how she chooses acting roles, the Dirty Films team (which also includes Coco Francini and Georgie Pym) takes a “filmmaker-driven” approach.

“No matter the budget or the genre, films are born out of interesting conversations, so that’s where we begin,” Blanchett tells Variety over the phone, chalking up the company’s “incredibly eclectic” selections to its principals’ Australian heritage.

“It’s a small country in terms of population, but we individually punch above our cultural weight, because we have such a mix of cultural influences, in a great way — also in a painful way,” she explains, alluding to the country’s birth by colonial invasion. “We have a very interesting perspective on the world.”

For her, the appeal of producing is less about finding a role to perform than about having a creative stake in the project.

“People often assume that when you have a production company, you are simply trying to develop materials for yourself. Sometimes that’s the case, and you do need to be in something,” Blanchett says, pointing to the “Stateless” as an example. The two-time Oscar-winner appeared in all six episodes of the miniseries that ultimately landed at Netflix. “I knew that I had to be in it in some way because of the material. No one wanted to make a project that was ostensibly about refugees and asylum seekers.”

Among other accolades, the drama earned 13 awards from the Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts. But she’s also found that an actor’s ability to work behind the scenes can be underestimated.

“Oftentimes, people think, as an actor, that you don’t have that perspective on the whole thing — that you don’t understand how a film is put together,” she observes. “After years and years and years of doing this, it’s not just sitting in your trailer, waiting for your hair and makeup call.”

Pointing to her contemporaries who also produce — including her Oscar-nominated “Nightmare Alley” producer and co-star Bradley Cooper, Matt Damon, Leonardo DiCaprio, and Reese Witherspoon — she adds, “You get involved in a project because you’re interested in the whole thing.”

“You’re involved from soup to nuts; you’re invested in that experience,” Blanchett explains. “So you get to understand how all of those cogs come together and you can see a way that they might be put together slightly differently, or what didn’t work, because you’re inside the experience. And that is what I find increasingly exciting. Acting, less and less so, frankly.”

As for stepping behind the camera to direct, Blanchett acknowledges she’s been “spoiled by some of the most astonishing directors of all time, so it feels like an act of hubris to think that I could or would.”

But she won’t count out the possibility entirely. “If it was material that took me by the short and curlies, it could happen. But just because you’re opinionated, as I painfully am, doesn’t mean you are a director.”

Last month, Blanchett accepted the 47th annual Honorary Ce?sar award, presented by French film icon Isabelle Huppert, and became the inaugural recipient of Spain’s International Goya award, given by Almodóvar and Penélope Cruz. Both prizes celebrated the actor and producer for her contributions to cinema on a global scale.

“I’ve known Isabelle for a while now; we’re both theater animals who also work in cinema, and she’s such a legend,” Blanchett says, reflecting on the “huge” honor. “Penélope’s work is constantly inspiring and [Cruz and Almodóvar] is a historic partnership. To be in Spain, presented by both of them, you die and go to heaven. I can’t work out why [they awarded me], but I didn’t say no.”

In her acceptance speeches, Blanchett shared how she’d been influenced by the great cinematic artists of those countries, including Spain’s Luis Buñuel and France’s Robert Bresson.

“Watching a Bresson film, when I was in my early teens, it blew the back of my head off. I’d never seen anything like it,” she recalls. “There’s so many Russian filmmakers that have been deeply influential on me, not only working in the cinema, but also as an actor on stage. One of my favorite films this year was Sean Baker’s ‘Red Rocket”; Janicza Bravo’s ‘Zola’ was profound. I consider American filmmakers ‘international.’”

Beyond her own range of influences and collaborations with international filmmakers, the awards represent Dirty Films’ penchant to think globally. The company is in pre-production on “Disclaimer” with Cuaro?n and will then go straight into Thornton’s “The New Boy” and, later, Almodóvar’s “A Manual for Cleaning Women.” Also, following their partnership on the critical-acclaimed “Apples,” which Dirty Films executive produced, they’ll team up with filmmaker Christos Nikou again for “Fingernails.”

According to Blanchett, their greatest strength as producers lies in their understanding of the creative process and “knowing where to cut corners and where that will enhance the ultimate, individual creative flourish of the product itself.”

“We can all find money; but money is more difficult to come by without any creative strings attached,” she says. “To find the right rhythm, the right wave, the right budget ties and the best way to film, it’s not a science, it’s an art.”

Blanchett also credits her and Upton’s time heading the Sydney Theatre Company with helping to hone their skills, particularly in reference to getting a production off the ground quickly instead of languishing in development hell.

“We have a much quicker rhythm. If we committed to an idea, we could get it on,” she says and between 2008-2013, the duo produced between 19 and 20 shows a year. In 2015, they officially awoke Dirty Films from its dormancy with Todd Haynes’ critically acclaimed “Carol” and it’s been full steam ahead ever since.

“We want to be nimble,” she explains. “There’s a lot of stuff being developed that may never see the light of day. We’re not into over-developing or over-committing. You can get the thing up eight years later, but you’ve lost the reason why [that story needed to be told]. That’s something that carried from working at the theater company.”

In recent years, Blanchett has headed the juries at the Cannes and Venice film festivals and relished watching the definition of “cinema” morph as boundaries between the big and small screens — as well as those between streaming and theatrical — blur.

“The streaming platforms have shaken things up,” she comments, regarding the way the distribution and windowing have shifted. “We don’t want them to calcify and reform and imitate the worst sides of studios in terms of monopolies, but it does mean that you don’t have to think of things in terms of length.”

Plus, she says, “Streaming platforms and series have kept us afloat, frankly, mentally and psychologically over the last two years.”

While Blanchett believes that “big ideas happen in a cinematic form,” she notes that, “There’s a lot of options there in the way we think about stories, and the possibility of how we realize those narratives. The idea of making a short film or a long masterwork — those definitions are much more nebulous now. And I think that’s really exciting.”

Additionally, the business itself has become more international and likewise has a wider reach with its themes.

“We’re finding we’re much more amoeba-like in terms of cultural boundaries. That’s where the cinematic arts are a real bridge between this surge of ridiculous, antiquated nationalism that’s happening,” Blanchett says, relating the conversation to the news of the day. “There aren’t closed borders because we are all communicating. So, this rubbish that is going on in the Ukraine — this horrendous, disgusting rubbish — is totally antithetical to the way human beings are actually communicating.”

The actor and producer, who is also a Global Goodwill Ambassador for UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency, adds: “I think cinema can, through the lens of metaphor and allegory, help audiences. Without wanting to sound too pretentious, I think it can help society to comprehend and possibly make some kind of sense of issues that we all have a stake in.”

SmartLess Podcast

We roll up our sleeves and get down to business with none other than Cate Blanchett. She reveals her aspirations to make cheese, Sean fans-out on Lord of the Rings, Will explains his rich history in lowered expectations, and Jason explores his elasticity challenges. Pass the honey butter; it’s SmartLess.

Click the image below to listen to the podcast. This episode will be available on Apple and Spotify on March 14th.

Magazine Scans

Paris Match No. 3798 – February 23rd 2022

Entertainment Weekly – March 2022

Variety -Match 9th 2022

Io Donna – March 12th 2022


Source: IoDonna, Variety, TV Tonight

Empire – December 2021 Issue Scan; & new Apple+ TV series directed by Alfonso Cuaron
Posted on
Oct 27, 2021

Empire – December 2021 Issue Scan; & new Apple+ TV series directed by Alfonso Cuaron

Hello, blanchetters!

New stills from Nightmare Alley has been released and scan from Empire UK – December 2021 Issue is now available where Nightmare Alley and Don’t Look Up are featured. At the recent Rome Film Festival, director Alfonso Cuaron said that Apple will be releasing more information about their new series where it is mentioned Cate will be starring in with Gary Oldman.

Empire – December 2021 Issue

We have also upgraded these two images to higher resolution:

Nightmare Alley: Guillermo Del Toro On Creating An ‘American Nightmare’ Noir

Click image for larger size:

From the caverns inhabited by the Pale Man in Pan’s Labyrinth, to the ghostly apparitions of Allerdale Hall in Crimson Peak, to the jaw-flapping Reapers in Blade II, chances are something that Guillermo del Toro has created has conjured up nightmares for you at some point in time. But with his next movie, the appropriately-titled Nightmare Alley, he’s creating a different kind of nightmare – a noir movie without any literal monsters, but filled with characters who might be considered monstrous. Take, for instance, Bradley Cooper’s central Stanton Carlisle and Cate Blanchett’s Lilith Ritter – a carnival worker and psychologist, respectively, who are caught up in a twisted plot.

Speaking to Empire in the upcoming Spider-Man: No Way Home issue, del Toro spoke about how his adaptation of William Lindsay Gresham’s 1946 novel strays differs from the former film version that came hot on the book’s heels in 1947 – and how he’s imbuing it with his own nightmarish sensibilities. “We’re wilfully allowing that movie to exist in its own space,” the director explains. “One of the things we decided is to not watch that movie again. We both liked what existed in it, we think it has terrific things in it, but what I wanted to do was, no pun intended, closer to a nightmare. It belongs to a genre only in that it deals with the underbelly or the flip side of the American Dream, which is always a nightmare.”

Don’t Look Up

As McKay tells Empire in the Spider-Man: No Way Home issue, Streep’s character is “an amalgam of all the ridiculous, ineffective Presidents that the United States has had over the past 40, 50 years.” And she’s far from the only big name in an astonishingly star-studded cast – one that features leads in Leonardo DiCaprio and Jennifer Lawrence (an astronomer duo warning of an approaching comet), plus Jonah Hill, Mark Rylance, Tyler Perry, Timothée Chalamet, Cate Blanchett, Himesh Patel, and appearances from Ariana Grande and Scott ‘Kid Cudi’ Mescudi.

It’s a stacked line-up that even McKay can’t believe. “Of course, it’s great to get tremendous actors in your movie, but I never expected it to be this many, and to this degree,” he says. “Initially I had a couple of people in mine – ‘Well, if we could get them, that would be great’ – and it just kind of kept snowballing.”

Source: Empire, Empire – DLU

Cate Blanchett to star in the upcoming Apple TV Mini-Series directed by Alfonso Cuarón

Oscar winner Alfonso Cuarón was a guest at the 16th Rome Film Fest: in the capital to talk about his relationship with Italian cinema, the director made a preview of Guillermo Del Toro’s Nightmare Alley , but also talked about the cinema of Federico Fellini, Paolo and Vittorio Taviani, Marco Ferreri, up to the contemporaries Emanuele Crialese, Valeria Golino and Alice Rorwacher.

On the red carpet of the Rome Film Fest 2021 he told us that soon Apple will announce something more detailed about the TV series, starring Cate Blanchett and Gary Oldman, which is making for the streaming platform AppleTV +.

We also asked him if he has seen his friend and colleague Guillermo Del Toro’s film Nightmare Alley before and the answer is yes: “It’s a masterpiece! Nightmare Alley is a wonderful masterpiece. I think it’s Guillermo Del Toro at his best: he really is. marvelous.”

Source: MoviePlayer

Conversation with Mrs. America’s Creative Team
Posted on
May 30, 2021

Conversation with Mrs. America’s Creative Team

Hi, everyone!

Producers Guild of America has uploaded a conversation with Mrs. America executive producers Cate Blanchett, who also starred in it, and Stacey Sher. Thanks to Catepedia from CBFChat for finding this video.

Thank you to Michael, Anamary, and Kelly for their donation to the website! We’re currently running donation drive to keep the site open.

Here’s the video:

Cate Blanchett attends virtual Screen Actors Guild Awards
Posted on
Apr 5, 2021

Cate Blanchett attends virtual Screen Actors Guild Awards

Hello, Blanchetters!

Cate has attended the virtual SAG Awards where she was nominated for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Television Movie or Limited Series for her role in Mrs. America. Check the videos and photos below.

Female Actor in a TV Movie or Miniseries

Cate Blanchett — Mrs. America
Michaela Coel — I May Destroy You
Nicole Kidman — The Undoing
WINNER: Anya Taylor-Joy — The Queen’s Gambit
Kerry Washington — Little Fires Everywhere

Source: Entertainment Weekly

Cate Blanchett wins Satellite Award, and Staged Extended Version released & more videos
Posted on
Feb 20, 2021

Cate Blanchett wins Satellite Award, and Staged Extended Version released & more videos

Hello, blanchetters!

Cate has won her first award for her role in Mrs. America and Staged has released an extended version of their series on DVD and there’s almost 2 minutes of added appearance with Cate. One of our former admins, Mary, found a video from July 2020, and STC has released a short video interview with Cate and Andrew. Enjoy!

Satellite Award for Best Actress in Limited Series

Staged extended version is also currently streaming on ABC Australia. We’ve cut it from the beginning of Cate’s appearance to the last but this is an extended version of it. This is the episode that was initially released.

Episode 7 – The Loo Recluse (Extended) Caps

Memories of the Wharf: Cate Blanchett & Andrew Upton

Former Artistic Directors’ Cate Blanchett and Andrew Upton have a history with The Wharf that starts well before their directorship, with Cate receiving her first role out of NIDA here, and Andrew Upton working as a Resident Director. Continuing in our series of Memories of The Wharf, watch them reflect on how their careers have been impacted from their time at The Wharf, and how walking down that long walkway feels like coming home.

Memories of the Wharf Caps

YOU MATTER – ABF Covid-19 Assistance

Cate along with other Australians actors and entertainment industry professionals appeared in a short video encouraging “actors and entertainment professionals both past and present and of all ages” to reach out to the Actors Benevolent Fund if they need assistance especially during the time of a pandemic.

You Matter – ABF Covid-19 Assistance

Cate Blanchett nominated for AACTA International Awards
Posted on
Feb 13, 2021

Cate Blanchett nominated for AACTA International Awards

Hi, everyone!

New nomination for Cate for Mrs. America

AACTA International Award for Best Actress in a Series
Cate Blanchett – “Mrs America”
Daisy Edgar-Jones – “Normal People”
Nicole Kidman – “The Undoing”
Catherine O’Hara – “Schitt’s Creek”
Anya Taylor-Joy – “The Queen’s Gambit”

The 10th annual awards will be presented via a highlights package of acceptance speeches, debuting on AACTA’s YouTube channel Saturday, March 6 AEDT / Friday, March 5 PST.

Source: Variety