Cate Blanchett to be a guest on #BooksToLiveBy – a BBC Sounds podcast

Cate Blanchett to be a guest on #BooksToLiveBy – a BBC Sounds podcast

Hey Blanchetters!

Cate Blanchett is among the guests from a new BBC Sounds podcast called Books To Live By hosted by Mariella Frostrup.
See the info below and stay tuned!!!

Listen to the podcast HERE

Thanks to CBF Chat members for sharing this info with us!!

New Interview | On Beauty: Cate Blanchett

New Interview | On Beauty: Cate Blanchett

Hello everyone!

Let’s start the week with this new interview for British Vogue, a couple of photos added to our gallery!
Enjoy!



Source: armani beauty instagram

Cate Blanchett has long been a female force to be reckoned with. Having starred in several big-hit movies – such as the Lord of the Rings franchise, Blue Jasmine and The Aviator – she’s not only a great talent, but her beauty and style musings are certainly notable, too. To mark the launch of Armani Si Fiori fragrance – she’s been the face of the beauty brand since 2014 – Blanchett talks to Vogue about fashion, feminism and fragrance.

On fragrance
I was given my first fragrance while I was at drama school, my friend gave me a Clinique perfume that she didn’t like. I had absolutely no money. But I think probably even earlier than that I wore perfume. I must have smelled like lavender or violets because that’s what my grandmother smelled of. For me, growing up with my mother and grandmother, and remembering their scents, I felt like one day I’m going to be allowed through the portal into womanhood and I, too, will wear a fragrance.

On hair colour
I changed from blonde to brunette [and then back to blonde] for a play [When We Have Sufficiently Tortured Each Other]. I was on stage at The National. I think I looked like my mother and my sister. It felt like some kind of throwback. I just felt like it was right for the character and it was right for the look of the play. So, I did it for work. I could’ve worn a wig, but I don’t like wearing a wig on stage. So, I did it for work.

On ageing
I don’t think about ageing at all until someone brings it up. [When] I think of some of the most inspiring faces, it’s Louise Bourgeois and Georgia O’Keeffe. I’m looking into the spirit of the woman and that’s what I love. Like Mr Armani, who’s really wanted to capture the spirit of being alive as a woman [in his work]. You know, it can be sensual, but it can also be full of power, it can be fragile, but it can be wicked. It’s a whole lot of dualities.

On skincare
It depends on the season. I always use good quality products and products that have a natural base [to them]. What I’ve been using recently (because of the weather) is Giorgio Armani Crema Nera. I use a cream moisturiser and a recovery oil every day to give my skin an extra barrier from the weather. But even on days like this [winter weather] I put on something with an SPF, too. I think it’s just a process I’ve inherited from growing up.

I’ve recently realised the power of exfoliation, so I use an exfoliant every day. If I’m not going to go out, I might put on a face mask. I occasionally have an oxygen facial – they’re great. Being on stage you’re constantly taking make-up on and off, it does take its toll on my skin.

On make-up
At night I’m usually face-planted onto a surface so I don’t have a lot of make-up on. During the day, I’ll wear mascara and I love the Rouge d’Armani matt lipstick. It’s really smooth and it doesn’t dry out your lips.

On fashion
I love fashion. I see it all as costume. That’s where it springs from [for me], an interest in character and costume – but also when you get to work with great designers or people who are so good at tailoring or interested in forward-looking ideas. If you look at people like Roksanda Ilincic and her incredible collection where she smashes those extraordinary colours and patterns together, it is really inspiring. Recently I was unpacking stuff and I found an Armani suit that I’ve had since 1997. You hold onto these things; you don’t necessarily need to have the latest and the new. So, if you have something that’s beautifully made, you keep it and you re-wear it. Fashion always looks backwards to look forward, so why can’t we just recycle and re-wear?

On reading
I have started an astonishing read by a journalist called Behrouz Boochani, called A Letter From Manus Island, about an offshore detention centre for Australia. The book is a series of texts that he smuggled out on his mobile phone and it is absolutely heartbreaking and eye-opening.

Having not read a lot of her previous work, I read a lot of Rachel Cusk’s writings last year. And I read an astonishing book by Maggie Nelson called The Argonauts, she’s part memoirist, part theoretician, part poet, part prose writer, she defies description. She wrote the book while she was pregnant, and [at the time] her partner was transitioning from female to male. She describes that whole journey. It’s an astonishing read.

On feminism
I think there are now more women in the writer’s room. There are more women at the centre of narratives being optioned and there are more platforms on which to release stories. There are certain stories, from the Nineties, about really interesting female lives but they were basically used to tell the same story about a woman. A woman in a man’s world. Whereas I feel now that the complexity and interest of these characters are being placed in very interesting backdrops and the stories that are being told about them are more sophisticated and complex. It excites me, both as an actor but also as an audience member. You don’t have to be in them to consume them.

Source


Update | Magazines featuring Cate Blanchett

Update | Magazines featuring Cate Blanchett

Hi Blanchetters!

While we wait for Cate’s next project, here are some magazines featuring interviews and articles.
Enjoy!

Cate Blanchett On Female Rage, The Smell Of Womanhood And Loving The Scent Of Cigars

It’s safe to say Cate Blanchett point blank refuses to let Hollywood define her. Whether it’s endlessly swapping between hair colours (brown to blonde in two weeks, anyone?) or playing seriously iconic women (Queen Elizabeth I and an elf, to name just a few), she defies being typecast. And we love her for it.

Catching up at the launch of Armani Si Fiori, the perfume Blanchett has helped to make a household name, the Australian native revealed the pretty ugly smells she secretly loves, the acting tips she exchanged with Margot Robbie, and her tricks for telling anxiety to get back in its box.

Red carpets can be nerve wracking, how do you overcome the jitters?
‘I think the more relaxed you can feel in any situation, whether it’s public or private, the more yourself you can be. Going on stage is up there on the nerve wracking scale! I tell my children that the feeling of anxiety is very close to the feeling of excitement, so I try and tell myself that I’m excited, not anxious. It’s a trick of the mind.’

What’s your go-to beauty look for feeling confident?
‘Someone else doing my hair and make-up! I don’t have a go-to look, I just have this ability to short circuit other people’s expectations and judgements on how I look. Maybe it’s because I’ve played so many different characters and looked so different, on camera and on stage, that my sense of self is very fluid. I don’t dress on the red carpet to get a thumbs up or thumbs down, I couldn’t care less. The secret is: don’t Google yourself and close down your social media accounts. It’s liberating.’

Which women have inspired you to be bolder in your career?
‘Gosh! I think about a young woman like Rosa Parks, or Cathy Freeman who’s an indigenous athlete in Australia. When I was younger I was quite obsessed with Frida Kahlo, Georgia O’Keefe and Lee Miller – they all broke a lot of boundaries.

‘DON’T GOOGLE YOURSELF AND CLOSE DOWN YOUR SOCIAL MEDIA ACCOUNTS. IT’S LIBERATING.’

‘I was incredibly nervous about playing Queen Elizabeth I – I actually spoke to Margot Robbie about this recently. When I heard she was playing the role I was super pleased. I said at the time when I played her, ‘Judi Dench played this role, who am I? Some nobody Australian! I’m going from the colonies to playing the great defining queen of England!’, and Margot said the same thing. We both agreed that it was a daunting role to take on, both as an actress, but also as an Australian actress.’

Why is it important for women to be fearless in 2019?
‘I think what’s happening in the world at the moment, which is quite different to the movement in the 70s, is that women are being heard and believed. Women are finally talking to one another and realising that the challenges they’ve had to face on a daily basis are not exclusive to their own experience, in fact, they’re very common and there’s no shame in it.

‘I think women carry a lot of daily shame, but the more you express, the less rage you hold onto, and the more you’re able to move positively forward together. I feel very strongly that women are not going to move backwards from that position.’

‘WOMEN CARRY A LOT OF DAILY SHAME, BUT THE MORE YOU EXPRESS, THE LESS RAGE YOU HOLD ONTO.’

You’re the face of Armani Si perfume which is all about saying yes, what’s the best thing you’ve said yes to?
‘I had someone once say to me, ‘You do not want to go to New Zealand and play an elf queen for three weeks,’ and I said, ‘It’s Peter Jackson are you kidding me?’ So I was pretty happy with that decision.

Which perfumes make you nostalgic?
‘There was a lot of hideous loud perfumes in the late 80s that used to give me headaches, like Dior Poison. So, I’ve always gravitated towards perfumes that have an oud or that sensual mysterious chypre. They linger better… They remind me of fragrances that my mother wore. Growing up in a household of women, I used to walk into my mother’s closet and I remember thinking, ‘This smells like womanhood’.

‘My grandmother smelt of talcum powder and violets. but my mother was more modern. Also, growing up in Australia the smell of the ocean, eucalyptus, and bush fires all take me right back to my childhood.’

‘I USED TO WALK INTO MY MOTHER’S CLOSET AND THINK, “THIS SMELLS LIKE WOMANHOOD.”‘

Which smells do you love that you shouldn’t?
‘I love the smell of petrol. I always find the experience of filling up my car profoundly depressing, even though I drive a hybrid, but I remember loving the smell as a child. No idea why! I also love the smell of marker pens – it’s a little more socially acceptable to sniff a pen than a gas tank… Oh, and cigar smoke! Again, I hate everything that it represents but I love the smell.’

Source


Vogue Japan – February 2019

Sha Magazine – February 2019

The Ceo Magazine – March 2019

IN Denmark – March 2019

Io Donna Italy – March 9th, 2019

Marie Claire Style Japan – March 14th, 2019

Cate Blanchett for Giorgio Armani Beauty and Sì Fiori

Cate Blanchett for Giorgio Armani Beauty and Sì Fiori

Hello everyone!

It’s time for an update!
New event and content featuring Giorgio Armani Global beauty Ambassador and face of perfume Sì, Cate Blanchett.
Let’s start with this beautiful photo Armani Beauty on instagram released a couple of days ago.



Source: https://www.instagram.com/p/BuzGpHgh0Sv/

Last Tuesday, Cate celebrated the launch of Sì Eau de Parfum Fiori in London at The Connaught where she also had a press day to promote the new fragrance. And she is blond again!

Do you remember Cate’s interviews with blogger Gogoboi from China? See them here. He’s back with a fun new article.
During her last visit to Shanghai, Cate spoke to him about Sì Passione and other beauty products from Giorgio Armani. Hopefully a full video from this interview will be released in the future.





Read full article ib Chinese here :https://mp.weixin.qq.com/s/L2x5K8yuUO5WUUbIv_YYag

There is also a small article from Elle Czech

CATE BLANCHETT BÁSNÍ O NOVÉM PARFÉMU OD ARMANIHO

Armani Sì je na sv?t? a s ním i jedine?ný film.
Sebev?domá. Krásná. Dokonalá. Nejnov?jší kampa? zna?ky Armani Beauty je p?esn? taková. Stejn? jako oscarová here?ka Cate Blanchett, která je její hlavní hv?zdou. V krátkém rozhovoru popsala ELLE, jak se jí nový parfém Armani Sì líbí a co ji ?eká v blízké budoucnosti.

Jak vnímáte ženu, která zt?les?uje v?ni Armani Sì?

Je to žena, kterou sama chci být. Dobrodružná, plná emocí, otev?ená všem p?íležitostem, sv?dná a spokojená sama se sebou.

Spolu s novým reklamním spotem vznikl i film Fleur Fortuné. Jaký je rozdíl mezi hraním v reklam? a ve filmu?

Osobn? nemám ráda ozna?ení „tvá? parfému“. Svoji roli vnímám víc spirituáln?… Spíš n?co jako duch v?n?. A proto jsem m?la radost, že ho m?žeme vyjád?it práv? pomocí filmu, který je daleko mén? statický než klasický reklamní spot. Ve filmu jsou emoce, radost, obavy, vzrušení, riziko, lehkost… A láska!

Co vás napadlo, když jste v?ni ucítila poprvé?

Domov. Vždycky byl vo?avý, vždy? to byl d?m plný žen. Levandule, frézie, v?n? d?eva, mo?e… Vzpomínám si, že moje babi?ka stále von?la po fialkách a maminka zase po citrusech.

Co se vám na v?ni nejvíce líbí?

Jak se umí nádhern? rozvon?t. Miluji v?n?, které voní podle vaší osobnosti!

Krom? toho, že jste si zahrála v Armaniho filmu, co dalšího ješt? chystáte?

„Aktuáln? m? m?žete vid?t Národním divadle v Londýn? v p?edstavení When We Have Sufficiently Tortured Each Other režisérky Katie Mitchell. Jedná se o dílo v?nované genderové politice – jde v n?m o v??ný boj o intimitu a rovnost. Není to každého šálek ?aje, ale je to jist? provokativní p?edstavení.

Existuje n?jaká postava, kterou byste si ráda zahrála, ale zatím vám ji nikdo nenabídl?

Mám ráda p?ekvapení. Vždy mi jde o to spolupracovat s kvalitním týmem. Ale když nad tím p?emýšlím, tak by m? asi bavilo zahrát si n?jakou postavu, kterou bych nejmén? o?ekávala.

Source

New HQS




Cate Blanchett to lead charity play reading in Middle Temple Hall on 24 March

Cate Blanchett to lead charity play reading in Middle Temple Hall on 24 March

Hey everyone!

New event in London!
It has been announced that Cate Blanchett is set to lead a play reading in Middle Temple Hall for The Kalisher Trust’s annual fundraising.
The play selected for this year event is ‘Land of the Free’ by award winning playwright Diane Samuels and will be performed at Middle Temple Hall on Sunday 24th March 2019. The play reading will run for a max of 90 minutes straight through and will be directed by Joe Harmston. Full casting is to be announced on The Kalister Trust website soon.

Read more information below and if you have the chance to go, don’t miss it!

Land of the Free
DATE: sunday, 24 March 2019
TIME: 6:00 pm
LOCATION: Middle Temple Hall
TICKETS PRICES: £10 – £60
Tickets Here

Official Website
The Kalisher Trust is a legal charity which helps young people from diverse backgrounds to develop the power of advocacy and supports those who aspire to become criminal barristers.

Land of the Free interrogates the conflict between personal and political love as seen in the context of political discourse in the United States from the hysteria of the McCarthy era to the year of the Twin Towers attack. Inspired by real figures and their extraordinary experiences at the hands of the FBI as machine of the American state, her play explores the true price of freedom and the cost of devoting one’s life to fighting for a more just world.

Learn More >>

LAND OF THE FREE
1969, the shores of Lake Champlain, upstate New York. Rosa Gold, wife of radical lawyer Joe Gold, and mother of five, sees a naked woman emerge from the water in the moonlight. Uncompromising and determined, Heidi lives the life Rosa, herself a communist, failed to sustain. Rosa had been arrested for spying for the Soviets in 1949. Joe had been her defence lawyer – he rescued her from the death penalty, then she married him. Still haunting her is the mysterious figure of Bud, FBI agent, defender of the Land of the Brave and the Free.

LAND OF THE FREE explores what it is to be a revolutionary in the USA in the late twentieth century, the nature of personal and political love, marriage for life, betrayal and the struggle to make a fairer world.

Source

Special thanks to Catepedia from CBF Chat for sharing this news!

Updates | Documentary Now! episode “Waiting for the Artist” featuring Cate Blanchett

Updates | Documentary Now! episode “Waiting for the Artist” featuring Cate Blanchett

Hello everyone!

Have you watched Documentary Now! episode “Waiting for the Artist”?
We have and we think Cate is amazing as perfomance artist Izabella Barta! The episode is hilarious and memorable!
If you haven’t watched it yet, make sure you do!
Here are our updates on this awesome project. Enjoy!


‘Documentary Now!’: The Incredible Cate Blanchett Episode That Had to Be Made in Four Days

There are few TV shows with as much obsessive attention to detail as “Documentary Now!” That’s probably why it came as no surprise to series co-creators Alex Buono and Rhys Thomas that one shot of Cate Blanchett riding a mini tricycle in a massive Hungarian courtyard ended up taking a big chunk of an entire day.

“There was one moment in it where she’s riding on a tricycle in the square. And that’s on screen for like five seconds. And that probably cost us about five hours to get that shot. When you’re shooting for four days total, that was an expensive shot to get. But it’s worth it because they’re just going to take place as her somewhere,” Buono told IndieWire.

It’s the kind of creative choice that “Documentary Now!” has the freedom to make, given its bizarre mission statement. Over 17 episodes to date, the IFC series has taken some of the most venerated and iconic documentary films and flipped them on their head. But in the process of crafting these comedic versions, they still have to follow some of the same filmmaking tenets that govern the works they’re parodying.

Read More:‘Documentary Now!’ Trailer: That’s Not Actually Marina Abramovic, That’s Cate Blanchett
“You’re making a documentary. So the ability even just to put it up for a few frames, it has an immense value to opening up the scale,” Thomas said. “Sometimes the crew’s like, ‘Do you really need that thing?’ I feel like we always push to do more of that.”

The series, now in its third season, has tackled plenty of the biggest documentary titles of recent years. The show’s most recent episodes have tackled parody versions of “Wild Wild Country” and the classic D.A. Pennebaker look behind the recording of the Broadway cast album for the Steven Sondheim musical “Company.”

This week’s episode has a slightly more narrow focus — the 2012 Matthew Akers film “Marina Abramovi?: The Artist Is Present” — but it enlisted the services of Blanchett, arguably the show’s most famous guest cast member to date. Luckily for the show, she came in with the same level of preparation that goes into making these episodes feel so close to the spirits of their predecessors. Playing this exaggerated version of notorious performance artist Abramovi? (the “Documentary Now!” version is named Izabella Barta), Blanchett plunged into all the wild riffs that the script called for.

“The way she threw herself into it was unforeseen. We knew she’d be good, but you don’t know until they walk up on set whether that they understanding the tone and the level of commitment, you know?” Thomas said. “But once she was on board, she was doing all this research. She had teeth made to shift her jawline. She had 15 wigs or something that she worked on with her longtime hair or makeup people. Her commitment to the detais matched our detail-oriented thinking.”

Filming all of Blanchett’s scenes in such a short time period meant not just making sure that all the logistical details were in place before production, but that the team could construct an entire fictional life’s worth of archival and artistic material in a single day.

“We basically created the body of work of her entire career. We had one day to do that because we needed to get all that footage and put together to projections and photos and stuff for the actual exhibit that we did at the end. We prepped like nuts. We were in Budapest about two weeks before we did it. Just seven days of 20-something-hour days, really trying to get it dialed in.”

One setpiece in particular gave the team an unexpected hurdle. One of the fake performance art pieces called for a prop toilet stall. In venue after venue, from the lodgings that inspired “The Grand Budapest Hotel” to one of the city’s famous train stations, the people in charge of the venues repeatedly balked at having something bathroom-related in a public space.

“Cate Blanchett is going to be in lingerie and she’s going to be lapping up milk and there’s going to be a cat there. She’s going to be tied to a wall,” Buono said, describing the pitch at various locations. “Then we said, ‘OK, we’re going to put a toilet stall right here.’ The Hungarians were just like, ‘Wait a minute, what do you mean a toilet stall? This is offensive that you would even suggest that.’ They wouldn’t budge.”

Eventually, they obtained clearance to film the scene in the Budapest Opera House. But that necessity of being flexible in the face of absurdity is a reflection of the same things the show asks of its performers, too.

“You’re moving so fast that unlike other shows, you don’t have trailers. Because the talent is never gonna go back to the trailers. It’s just, ‘No, no, no, stay with us. You’re gonna be shooting again in five minutes’” Buono said.

It all goes back to the insane weekly time crunch of another show that gave so many of the creative team their start.

“So many of us that make the show came from ‘Saturday Night Live’ and had been there for a very long time. I think a lot of our crew would rather not be that way, but we all respond really well to quick [turnarounds],” Buono said.

“It’s kind of exciting,” Thomas added. “That’s always the challenge of, ‘Well, how are we going to do it?’”

Source

‘We Hope She Likes It’: Fred Armisen Explains How He and Cate Blanchett Parodied Marina Abramovic and Ulay

This week, the world was finally treated to “Waiting for the Artist,” a pitch-perfect parody of the 2012 documentary Marina Abramovic: The Artist Is Present.

The mockumentary, which is part of the third season of Documentary Now!, stars two-time Academy Award winner Cate Blanchett as Izabella Barta (a thinly veiled Abramovic) and Fred Armisen as Dimo (a fictionalized Ulay, the artist who collaborated with Abramovic in in the 1970s and ’80s).

Throughout the episode, we follow Barta as she struggles to come up with a new work for an upcoming show in Budapest. “The question on everyone’s mind that they’re not saying is, ‘does she have anything new to say?’” Dimo tells the filmmaker. “I think maybe not; her best work is in the past.”

The show is full of small delights for art-world insiders. There’s a Klaus Biesenbach-type curator, an appearance by the real-life Mr. Brainwash, and even a sequence in which Blanchett (as Barta) trains young performance artists, which is presumably inspired by Abramovic’s plans to open the Marina Abramovic Institute for the Preservation of Performance Art.

There is also a clever bit of gender politics. In the show, Barta labors to advance her career, while Dimo, a lazy unoriginal, and conceited artist, finds success easily. “I put no thought and no time into it,” he says at one point about one of his exhibitions. “Opening night, I went to the store and bought a bunch of crap,” including a fork and a toothbrush that he displays to acclaim.

Barta, on the other hand, is best known for her piece Bucket Series, in which the audience is invited to litter the gallery floor with all sorts of objects before the artist rushes in with bucket over her head, racing to answer a phone ringing in the center of the room.

In an interview with artnet News, Armisen was quick to clarify that he has nothing against Ulay. “In any narrative piece, you need a sort of villain, for lack of a better word,” he says. The choice to make Dimo lazy was plot driven, providing a foil to Barta’s unfailing dedication to her work.

One commentator in the show sums up their relationship thusly: “you had a woman who risked everything for her art, and a man who risked nothing.” (In real life, Abramovic and Ulay have had their ups and downs, but have set aside their differences in recent years, even making plans to write a joint memoir.)

We talked with Armisen about the episode, the challenges of parodying art, and waiting in line at art museums. This conversation has been edited and condensed for clarity.

What was it like filming this episode with Cate Blanchett?
We shot it in Budapest, and there was a video art piece at the museum with Cate Blanchett in it. A total, total coincidence! [Julian Rosefeldt’s Manifesto, in which Blanchett plays 13 different roles, was at the National Gallery from May 30–August 12, 2018.]

Amazing! That’s a great piece. And it really shows what a chameleon Cate is.
We weren’t prepared for how much work she was going to put into it! She showed up with her own wardrobe, with outfits that were like Marina’s. Cate even had some sort of dental things to make her look more like Marina. Sometimes I like to fancy myself the person who over-prepares and really gets into it—she was 10 times that. She could have done the whole episode on her own. The accent, the posture, oh man, it was incredible.

Even her skin had the right kind of… sheen.
Yeah! Whatever that quality is, she had it.

Did you see the MoMA show?
No! There was a line! I saw the movie and I love pieces like that, but I can never wait in line to see art. It’s not that I’m a snob, it’s that I can’t enjoy it if i’ve been waiting. It’s too much for me. I like a nice empty gallery, an empty performance.

Have you spoken to Marina about the episode at all?
No! I wish I did. I’ve never met her. Let her know that we are huge fans and we hope she likes it.

Why is she a good parody subject?
The boldness of her presence—and I know her documentary is called The Artist Is Present—there is something about that, the fact that it moved so many people. That, I think, is moving. If a band has a hit record, something worked, something resonated. I consider her to be somebody who had a hit piece, a hit art performance. It’s a rare thing to hit the mainstream. It happens sometimes 100 years after you’re dead. The fact that she did that in present day is really rare. How great is that? I really respect her art.

What’s your favorite part of the episode?
I like the footage of Cate putting the pail over her head with the marbles on the floor. It just made me laugh. It’s a silly part to it—I underestimate silliness.

I loved the Mr. Brainwash cameo. Any chance you guys would do a Exit Through the Gift Shop parody?
Maybe. It’s just too hard to really nail. We kind of did one on Portlandia, where one of the characters thought he was Banksy. He saw some graffiti and he was like, “oh that looks like my handwriting. I wonder if I’m Banksy?” Whenever you depict art, it’s very difficult because it can come off as just lazy or easy.

Source



BTS photos from Documentary Now Instagram

See visual guide of Cate’s perfomances on Documentary Now >>here