First look at “Sweet Tooth”, Australian fairy tale film narrated by Cate Blanchett

First look at “Sweet Tooth”, Australian fairy tale film narrated by Cate Blanchett

Hey everyone!

New project with Cate!

Cate Blanchett is the narrator of new Australian fairy tale short film called Sweet Tooth. The 22 minutes movie, set in a fictional European town in 1780, is inspired by the classic narrative of Hansel and Gretel but focusing on the untold of the wicked witch and her gingerbread house.
Sweet Tooth is directed by Shannon Ashlyn and it is also a project proudly committed to pushing for change both in front of and behind the camera in terms of gender parity in the film industry.

No release date is available at the moment. However, stay tuned!

Synopsis

Once upon a time, there were a brother and a sister called Hansel and Gretel. The children stumbled through the dark woods, lost and afraid, until they came upon a marvelous house of sugar and spice and everything nice. That is the fairy tale we know. But there are always two sides to every story.
Many moons earlier, a little girl is born to a penniless baker’s maid – a baby blinded by the Red Devil’s disease. Together with her little brother, she must navigate a cold world and stand up to the hardened townsfolk who dislike them. But, as time passes, the children have fewer and fewer places left to hide and must seek refuge in the forest. Out there, it will be up to them to find a home where no one will ever find them. Until, one day, there would come a brother and a sister: Hansel and Gretel.

On Cate Blanchett being part of the project:

Cate Blanchett supports emerging female filmmakers

Albert Einstein once said, ‘If you want your children to be intelligent, read them fairytales. If you want them to be more intelligent, read them more fairytales!’ And who better to tell you a tale of dark forests and magic beyond your wildest dreams than the inimitable Cate Blanchett?
[…]

Blanchett has unquestionably given wings to these filmmakers as they step out onto the international stage with their first film. By endorsing this story, the Australian icon has not only elevated the film in a way they hardly dared imagine until it actually happened, but she has also made a clear statement about supporting emerging female talent going forth and claiming executive roles in filmmaking, the roles which are traditionally (and therefore disproportionately) filled by men.
The week the filmmakers approached Blanchett, Dr. Blasey Ford was standing trial in the Kavanaugh hearings in the US. It never felt more timely to be courageous and to go out on a limb for the sake of women everywhere. Witch hunts are far from being a thing of the past.
To Ashlyn and Shearer, the fact that Blanchett agreed to lend her voice and profile to Sweet Tooth is proof that when women unite, anything is possible, and that magic doesn’t just happen in fairy tales.

***

How did you convince Cate Blanchett to join the Sweet Tooth team?

Shannon Ashlyn: The answer is very simple: we just asked her – from the heart and with zero expectations. Mad as it sounds, we never imagined anyone else narrating, so when it finally came to it, I plucked up the courage to record a piece to camera explaining why I had written the film and why I believed its message might be something Cate may also deem important. Admittedly, it felt surreal…!
Katherine Shearer: That was the first, crucial step. But after that, it still took a lot of faith and support from the people around us to get our message to Cate. For instance, our casting agent and mentors at AFTRS really put themselves out there for us, even as first-time filmmakers. That was incredibly humbling, and we are so thankful. The fact that Cate actually agreed was – and is – a dream come true.


Teaser – Trailer

Poster

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This Changes Everything – Next screenings and limited release

This Changes Everything – Next screenings and limited release

Hello everyone!

This Changes Everything is one of the many projects Cate was involved in during 2018. And we have news about it.
The documentary, produced by Geena Davis, that take an investigative look and analysis of gender disparity in Hollywood, has been touring film festivals since last fall, when it debuted at Toronto International Film Festival.

For those unwilling to wait for the cinamtic release, the project will be screened at RiverRun International Film Festival (more infos here), at Minneapolis St Paul International Film Festival on April 11 (tickets here) and the 38th Instanbul Film Festival (tickets here). The documentary is part of the Women in Power Conference (infos here) and it will open the Artemis Women in Action Film Festival on April 26 (tickets here)

According to Rotten Tomatoes the limited release, announced few months ago by Deadline is set for June 28, 2019.

At the time there is not an official trailer, but you can hear what this is all about from the director’s own voice. Enjoy!

Cate Blanchett for Beauty Papers magazine VII Glamour issue

Cate Blanchett for Beauty Papers magazine VII Glamour issue

Hey Blanchetters!!

Time for a new interview with Cate Blanchett! She is in the cover of Beauty Papers magazine VII Glamour issue released today. Cate Blanchett stars as American artists Bruce Nauman and Andy Warhol in a short video and photoshoot for the magazine.
If you can, make sure you buy a copy!

Performance: Cate Blanchett

[…] Undeniably beautiful, yet she is too intelligent, too complex and too layered to be shoved into an easy package. It is this complexity that makes her arguably the best of her generation. She leapt to international fame with regal period excess in Elizabeth, progressed through waspish 1950s bourgeois in The Talented Mr Ripley and excelled with ethereal elvish mystery in The Lord of the Rings. She has worked with directors such as Todd Haynes, Sally Potter, Jim Jarmusch and Martin Scorsese on comedies, dramas, thrillers and period pieces. She is an Australian who can seem faultlessly Scottish, Russian, American or British. Blanchett has won Oscars for Blue Jasmine and The Aviator, been nominated for four others, and notched up three Golden Globes. She is at the top of her game, yet not afraid to be experimental, as her collaboration with artist Julian Rosefeldt in 2015 demonstrated. Away from the stage and the screen, she is also a UNHCR Global Goodwill Ambassador, working on human rights projects.

Many of her roles have played with or unpicked the image of beauty. The mature lesbian chic of Carol, the disintegrating edges of Jasmine in Blue Jasmine or the confused attraction of Sheba in Notes on a Scandal all highlight the fact that there is something beyond perfect hair, clothes and sex appeal. Blanchett truthfully comes across as a woman of substance.

Francesca Gavin: Your career grew out of theatre and you worked with the Sydney Theatre Company for a long period, more recently working on Broadway and in London. Are you still attracted to working on the stage? Which aspects of your stage experiences do you think have had the most influence on your approach to acting and creating?

Cate Blanchett: Now that is a question and a half… My time as co-artistic director of the Sydney Theatre Company was probably the most formative regenerative period of my career thus far. A homecoming of sorts – to the rich and hungry artistic community from which I sprang. But apart from the enormous responsibility for the fiscal and creative health of the company and indeed fostering the careers of emerging and mid-career artists, Andrew [Upton, husband] and I were placed into a dynamic national creative conversation. This was so very galvanising. For better or worse, one still has to fight in Australia for the basic notion that the arts should be available and central to people’s lives. But perhaps this is rapidly becoming a global issue. Wasn’t it Winston Churchill who refused to cut arts funding during the war as an austerity measure saying, ‘Then what are we fighting for?’ In spite of all the talent my country possesses, there is still a profound lack of confidence in our artistic output. That was in large part why we made it our mission to tour the company’s work internationally.

FG: How do you approach finding such a breadth of roles? Variety feels something central to your choices.

CB: Oh yes, variety is very much the spice of my life… but I’m beginning to think about repetition much more. When I say that, I mean in order to go more deeply into things – not always looking for the next and the new. Perhaps part of why I’m an actor is that I’m far more interested in the thoughts, feelings and experiences of others than of my own – mine are a tad boring. I’m sure there are a myriad of people who would back me up there! But to try to answer your question… my choices have always been made on instinct. And, since having children, around school holidays.

FG: What do you find interesting about the process of transformation – visually, but also internally and psychologically – when you become different characters?

CB: All I ever see is myself. Which bores me rigid. Transformation is not a focus for me. The story is – do I want to be part of this conversation? Do I have anything to offer it? But in terms of character – which is always the point of entry for me in a project – I am very text-based. The rhythm of good writing. The tempo of a character as well as what they choose not to say. Often, what someone says is a smokescreen to what they actually think or feel. Who does a character think they are as opposed to who they actually might be.

FG: What are your feelings about the pressures that Hollywood presents to women in terms of their looks?

CB: Oh, those boring pressures are age-old and eternal. Men feel them too, I’m sure, but the reaction to this manifests itself in different ways. But I feel there is a healthy interest in people’s points of difference, their uniqueness, which means performers are stepping into a space of boldly finding their own non-cookie-cutter way of doing ‘their thang’. Women, in particular, are collectively now prizing their worth and their individuality. I think that extends to challenging the male gaze which has run mainstream cinema for so long. Nothing wrong with a male gaze – it’s just mind-numbingly boring and exclusive if other perspectives are suffocated.

FG: Some of the characters you have played on screen – for example, Jasmine in Blue Jasmine – are very conscious of their perceived image. What have you found interesting about that sense of self-preoccupation?

CB: I’m always saying yes, perhaps to my own detriment. I just get excited by fabulous ideas – and the prospect of nutting out a world and sets of experiences or theories I have no present knowledge of. The only hard part about that for me is the doing of it. I’m a little on the shy side. Kaboom! Not all actors are exhibitionists.

FG: What is your definition of glamour?

CB: Glamour shines, it’s effortless and unselfconscious and damn sexy. It’s also quite unattainable. Something to reach for. It probably also involves brushing one’s hair?

FG: You have played some incredibly strong, powerful proto-feminist women, from Elizabeth to Katharine Hepburn. What do you like about these individuals who are either in positions of power or innately powerful? To what extent do you feel that is a reflection of yourself?

CB: If there is any similarity between characters I’ve played on film and myself it’s utterly unintentional. But when you say powerful, what do you mean exactly? That these women have a strong impact on the narrative? They know and speak their minds? Because a woman in a position of power is not an interesting enough byline for a film in and of itself. Often in the past, producers have been fascinated by certain so-called powerful women in history, women who have made an impact on events, on the world around them, broken new ground, women who are complicated and conflicted. But then haven’t bothered to find a reason to make a film about them. Having had the imagination to locate them in a riveting story that is more than their character alone. The story is the thing. The perspective. Interesting ‘powerful’ male characters have more often than not been encased in a great ripping story.

FG: What are your feelings about the representation and limitations of gender?

CB: I’ve been reading Maggie Nelson lately, who is fascinating and revelatory on the subject of gender binary thinking. She talks about gender as not being volunteerism, about it not being performative. She referenced Judith Butler about dealing with the question of how do we rework the trap we are all inevitably in. I’m fascinated right now with how one turns the inclusive nature of feminism, female equality, from downfall to unassailable strength. How one claims it without allowing it to be weaponised…It’s why I wanted to be in Martin Crimp’s play with Katie Mitchell [When We Have Sufficiently Tortured Each Other]. To investigate all this ‘stuff’.

FG: What are your feelings about make-up and costume? Do you find them inspiring elements in your process of creation?

CB: I adore make-up and costume. The most delicate and robust creative time on any project happens in wardrobe fitting and in the make-up business. And so very many of those elastic tossing-ideas-around and trying-things-out sessions have been with Morag [Ross]. Her eye and her sense of risk are very, very inspiring.

FG: Your job is to constantly embody other people. How do you maintain your sense of self?

CB: My sense of self, if I have one, is non-linear and utterly elastic. And honestly, apart from owning my fuck-ups and missteps, of which there are many, I try to think about myself as little as possible. There is just too much else to be concerned about in the world right now. The void under the Thwaites Glacier? The Dakota Pipeline, anyone? Australia’s offshore detention horrors…?

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Cate Blanchett as a guest on #BooksToLiveBy – a BBC Sounds podcast

Cate Blanchett as a guest on #BooksToLiveBy – a BBC Sounds podcast

Hey Blanchetters!!!!

The BBC Sounds podcast called Books To Live By hosted by Mariella Frostrup has released it’s episode featuring Cate Blanchett today!!!

Click on the image to listen to it!

Update: Thanks to Catepedia on CBF Chat!

How to Train Your Dragon 3 – Digital, DVD and Blu-ray to be released in May

How to Train Your Dragon 3 – Digital, DVD and Blu-ray to be released in May

Hello dear friends, if you have loved How To Train Your Dragon 3, now it’s time to pre-order your own copy!
The animation movie will be released for home entertainment in 4 different formats, starting on May 7 with the digital version to be followed by the 4K Ultra HD, Blu-Ray™, DVD, and On Demand ones on May 21, 2019.

Read below to discover the bonus contents:

BONUS FEATURES ON 4K Ultra Hd, BLU-RAY, DVD and digital:

Alternate Opening with Intro by Writer/Director Dean DeBlois

DreamWorks Shorts:
Bilby – Directed by Liron Topaz, Pierre Perifel and JP Sans; produced by Jeff Hermann and Kelly Cooney Cilella. Threatened daily by the deadly residents and harsh environment of Australia’s Outback, a lonesome Bilby finds himself an unwitting protector, and unexpected friend, to a helpless (and quite adorable) baby bird.
Bird Karma – Directed by William Salazar and produced by Jeff Hermann, the beautifully artistic 2D short film Bird Karma tells a delightfully lyrical and fully unexpected tale of a long-legged bird’s journey of blissful joy, inescapable greed and the accidental discovery of the consequences when too much is not enough.

Deleted Scenes with Intros by Writer/Director Dean DeBlois

How to Voice Your Viking – Go behind the scenes with the cast as they record the Viking voices of HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON: THE HIDDEN WORLD.

Creating an Epic Dragon Tale – Discover what filmmakers learned while crafting this epic dragon trilogy.

How I Learned from Dragons – The diverse cast of characters reveal why they think the dragon trilogy is so special.

Brave Wilderness Presents: Nature + Dragons = Awesome – Join Coyote Peterson, host of Brave Wilderness, as he explores what it takes to make the dragon’s characters come to life.

The Dragon Sheep Chronicles – Protecting sheep from the dragons of Berk is no easy task but Hiccup has a plan.

A Deck of Dragons – Observe four new dragons as Fishlegs unveils his original deck of dragon trading cards.

Growing Up with Dragons – After years of being with these characters, hear the lasting effects of the dragon trilogy from the filmmaker’s perspective.

The Evolving Character Design of Dragons – Cast and crew reveal what it was like to evolve not only the characters of HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON: THE HIDDEN WORLD, but themselves as well.

Drawing Dragons – Get a glimpse of what goes in to designing a DreamWorks dragon.

Epic Villain – A different kind of villain, Grimmel brings great challenges to the village of Berk. Go behind the scenes as filmmakers breakdown this epic character.

Astrid’s Whole Dragon Trilogy in 60 Seconds – Hold on tight as Astrid sums up the whole dragon trilogy in a legendary 60 seconds.

Welcome to New Berk – With Hiccup as your guide, get a firsthand look at the updated Viking village of New Berk.

Feature Commentary with Writer/Director Dean DeBlois, Producer Bradford Lewis and Head of Character Animation Simon Otto

HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON: THE HIDDEN WORLD will be available on 4K Ultra HD, Blu-rayTM, DVD and Digital.

4K Ultra HD is the ultimate movie watching experience. 4K Ultra HD features the combination of 4K resolution for four times sharper picture than HD, the color brilliance of High Dynamic Range (HDR) with immersive audio delivering a multidimensional sound experience.
Blu-rayTM unleashes the power of your HDTV and is the best way to watch movies at home, featuring 6X the picture resolution of DVD, exclusive extras and theater-quality surround sound.

Digital lets fans watch movies anywhere on their favorite devices. Users can instantly stream or download.

MOVIES ANYWHERE is the digital app that simplifies and enhances the digital movie collection and viewing experience by allowing consumers to access their favorite digital movies in one place when purchased or redeemed through participating digital retailers. Consumers can also redeem digital copy codes found in eligible Blu-rayTM and DVD disc packages from participating studios and stream or download them through Movies Anywhere. MOVIES ANYWHERE is only available in the United States. For more information, visit https://moviesanywhere.com.

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Land of the Free – Public Reading at Middle Temple Hall

Land of the Free – Public Reading at Middle Temple Hall

Hello dear Blanchetters, welcome back!
As we previously announced Cate Blanchett was part of the cast that held a public reading of the play Land of the Free by Diane Samuels last Sunday.

The play interrogates the conflict between personal and political love as seen in the context of political discourse in the United States from the hysteria of the McCarthy era to the year of the Twin Towers attack. The play explores the true price of freedom and the cost of devoting one’s life to fighting for a more just world.



The public reading, directed by Joe Harmston and sponsored by the Kalisher Trust, has taken place at the Middle Temple Hall in London. Cate played Rosa Gold and her second-born, Roman Upton, debuted with her, playing young Ben Gold.



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