Madame Figaro (Magazine Scan)
Posted on
Jul 1, 2022

Madame Figaro (Magazine Scan)

Hello!

Madame Figaro has interviewed Cate Blanchett and Steven Stokey-Daley during LVMH Prize at the beginning of June 2022. The interview below is Google translated. You can check the scan for the original text.

Madame Figaro – July 1st 2022
 

“GOSH … IT’S LIKE AN OSCAR!” The young Englishman Steven Stokey-Daley hugs the golden trophy of the 9th edition of the LVMH Prize, rewarding a promising talent in fashion, an actress multi-Oscar winner, a sublime woman with a magnetic and benevolent gaze, has just presented it to him. On this improvised stage, Cate Blanchett does not play. The Australian-American star is really happy to see the emergence of this young generation of creators focused on beauty and ethics. This prize has already been a springboard for today’s world-renowned creators, such as Nensi Dojaka (winner of the previous edition), Jacquemus or Marine Serre. The endowment of 300,000 euros and mentoring within the LVMH group aim to help the winner develop and promote his brand. Like all the nominees, Steven Stokey-Daley is inhabited by the historical vocation of fashion designers: to make people dream. But also by the new role taken on by this prodigious industry: to be a vector of sustainable development. It is in this spirit that he has designed, under his label S.S.Daley, a collection that diverts the codes of the fan tassed wardrobe of English private schools, a universe opposed to his own since he comes from the working class of Liverpool. Recovered materials, vintage pieces…, he even transformed old napkins dedicated to tea service into patchwork shirts! The 26-year-old designer has already worked for Alexander McQueen and Tom Ford, and also dresses pop star Harry Styles, actress Emma Corrin and singer Dua Lipa.  There’s punk in it, but soft, rounded, dotted with flowery patterns. His fashion thwarts identities and questions the unwritten rules of tradition. And we are delighted, on this British Jubilee Day, to launch this meeting between these two subjects of Her Majesty.

MADAME FIGARO: Steven Stokey-Daley, how do you feel?

STEVEN STOKEY-DALEY: The truth? I did not expect that! I’m still in shock, and so happy!

MF: Cate Blanchett, what did you think of the finalists and the winner?

CATE BLANCHETT: I am amazed by everyone, and I must say quite moved by the message and the story of Steven’s collection, which values British craftsmen. I am originally from Australia, I know the fragility of certain know-how lost forever. I think of those women who mastered old techniques of printing and dyeing fabrics… (She turns to him.) That you managed to show us that with your collection really touched me.

S.S.D: Did you notice? Thanks! In fact, I started working on this collection during the pandemic, in full confinement. Nothing entered the interior of the country, so I made it my mission to find the best local artisans, to highlight our heritage, those who work with silk, spinners and spinners of Scottish wool, weavers  and Irish linen weavers…

MF: Do you think the pandemic has taught us anything or that we will go back to business as before?

S.S.D: This period inevitably changed our outlook and our way of working. Forced to look at what we had in us, inside, we notably rediscovered small local crafts.

CB: I think that the big brands are inspired by this emerging generation of designers who have in their DNA a responsible approach in terms of practice, image and relationships with others. Even in how they treat employees and customers, they drive change.

S.S.D.: My generation shares the same values, it’s almost second nature for us to be eco-responsible. But if I did upcycling, it’s also because I didn’t have the means to buy luxurious fabrics… By pushing me to play with materials that I had already used, sustainable development also allowed me to do my job!

MF: On this subject, you preach a convinced: Cate Blanchett you made the headlines for having walked the red carpet with dresses that you had already worn in the past…

CB: I love beautiful things, and when we have the privilege and the luxury of being able to wear a couture garment made expressly for you, it would not only be sad but inelegant and absurd to wear it only once! You’ll laugh, when I arrived in Cannes with a sumptuous dress, some journalists, looking a little embarrassed for me, slipped me quietly: “I think you’ve already worn it…” I replied: “Yes, I know!” Where I had thought of a form of celebration, they saw inattention…

S.S.D.: This is a way of educating and sensitizing the public: showing the world that a piece of clothing can live for more than the time of an evening, however chic it may be!

MF: Your professions, fashion and cinema shape the imagination and have often accompanied societal changes, sometimes announcing them: do you think this is still the case?

CB: The future is always shaped in the minds of artists. This is where the dream begins. We tell a story and we invite people to enter it whether it’s a film, a fashion collection, a choreography or a book… They enter an imaginary landscape without ideas preconceived, all possibilities open, offered. To come back more specifically to your question, in our respective sectors, even if we are not the worst polluters, we produce quite a lot of waste. We can do better and demonstrate that it is possible to reduce our carbon impact.

S.S.D.: Fashion is a form of theater that carries a message about society and can drive change. It shows how to be poetic, how to dream and be ambitious without doing any damage!

CB: Yes!

MF: Cate Blanchett, thanks to your profession, you have been able to wear clothes from all eras, even the clothes of Queen Elizabeth, which are not very practical…

CB: Everything can be reinterpreted today, Nicolas Ghesquière (artistic director of Louis  Vuitton, editor’s note) did well with basket dresses in its fashion shows! I love inhabiting these silhouettes as much as their minds: it’s the great privilege to enter into the imagination of creators. For me, even if obviously the relationship with the director is essential, when I have to interpret a character, it is with the costume designer that I start the conversation, with them the character‘s psychology takes shape. Basically, there is a big difference between what we think we are, who we aspire to be and who we really are… Often, we dress either to hide ourselves or to reveal ourselves. Fashion understands this perfectly, it accompanies and facilitates our desires, our aims and our inspirations.

S.S.D.: Today, fashion no longer prescribes lines to follow all drawn, everyone can draw from a thousand different wardrobes without having to display who they are…

CB: Yes, I agree. People often ask me questions about identity, but – and it is. Maybe that’s why I’m an actress – my identity is so fluid! Obviously I am not an amoeba, I have a solid moral base and strong convictions, but my identity is fluid…

S.S.D.: I understand perfectly. I started doing theater as a teenager, in a national company.  For a while, I even thought I was going to make it my career. It’s interesting what you say about building a character through clothing. Me, I first think of a character to define his look.

MF: So it’s not the habit that makes the monk…

S.S.D.: No, it is the monk who makes the habit, the character defines the clothes. For a collection, I create my little universe with six or seven characters…

CB: Oh, it’s exciting!

S.S.D.: Thank you… I’m writing their whole story, their background… It’s a lot of work, too much writing!  But all this information defines the garment, the cut, the material, the details, what the person can do with it and in what situation…

MF: Artists, by definition, you live from the desire of the other: is this need for public recognition a brake or a driving force?

CB: Paying attention to how you are going to be greeted before you even start work is putting the cart before the horse, a dangerous way to work. You can’t think about what’s going to happen first. I imagine it’s the same for a collection, you just have to move forward, one step after another.

S.S.D.: Absolutely. I forbid myself to think about the outcome, or how the result of my work will be perceived. Otherwise, I couldn’t move forward…

CB: We wouldn’t get up in the morning… But it takes courage. I, for example, am full of fears and doubts. But at the end of the day, we get up and do what we have to do. When the film comes out, I go back under the duvet thinking: “Anyway, no one is going to see it”…and that’s often the case! (Laughs.) The idea of ??doing everything for people to like, it’s so unpleasant, precisely. And at the same time, it‘s so brutal to be on display, to do a job that lives off the public.

MF: Do prizes help you move forward?

CB: I experienced something very strange this year, and very unexpected: I received three important awards. You have to understand that as an Australian, I would never have imagined being recognized and rewarded outside of my culture. I still can’t believe it, it’s very intimidating for me and I imagine you, Steven, must feel the same way when this international group that is LVMH gives you a prize…. At the same time, the prizes are gratifying, but it is the failures that allow us to learn. The path to success—whatever that word means—is a bumpy road. I know, it sounds a bit like advice from a mother, but it‘s so true: you do not learn much by winning a prize, you should not lock yourself into it.

MF: Cate Blanchett, based on your experience, would you have any advice to give him?

CB: Oh no! Advice is unbearable. Ask my children, I’m constantly on their backs.

MF: So, any question you would like to ask him?

CB: Two. What music inspires you? And where do you see yourself in five years?

S.S.D.: Kate Bush! I’m obsessed with her, I listened to her a lot during the preparation of this collection. And in five years… Gosh… I don’t know. I hope to be happy and in agreement with my choices.

CB: Who would you like to collaborate with? No, do not answer, call me next week! (Laughs.)

Cate Blanchett on ABC 90th Birthday Celebration and Channel 4 Dispatches
Posted on
Jun 30, 2022

Cate Blanchett on ABC 90th Birthday Celebration and Channel 4 Dispatches

Hi, everyone!

Cate Blanchett appeared on the 90th birthday celebration of ABC Australia where she presented some of the network’s most notable dramas. You can watch the video below. Full celebration can be streamed on ABC iview. Channel 4’s documentary Ukraine: Life Under Attack which Cate narrated is now available to stream on the network’s website for those living in the UK.

Click image to watch the documentary.

Cate Blanchett for Louis Vuitton’s High Jewelry Campaign
Posted on
Jun 28, 2022

Cate Blanchett for Louis Vuitton’s High Jewelry Campaign

Great news, everyone!

Cate Blanchett has been named as the newest ambassador for Louis Vuitton’s largest high jewelry collection. Check the latest announcement below.

Click image for higher resolution

 Louis Vuitton is poised to unveil its largest high jewelry collection to date in Marrakech on Tuesday, and it has a new brand ambassador to front the line: Cate Blanchett.

The Oscar-winning Australian actress stars in the advertising campaign for the Spirit collection, photographed by Sølve Sundsbø, which is set to break in WWD on Friday and in The Economist and the Financial Times’ How to Spend It magazine on Saturday. The images were styled by Carine Roitfeld, with artistic direction by Baron & Baron.

Blanchett has supported Vuitton for at least a decade, attending a store opening in Rome as far back as 2012. Earlier this month, she handed out the LVMH Prize for Young Designers at a ceremony in Paris, wearing an outfit by Vuitton womenswear designer Nicolas Ghesquière.

“She’s one of a kind. She transcends culture, she transcends times, she transcends trends. Many things have changed, and she’s there, as relevant as ever,” said Michael Burke, chairman and chief executive officer of Louis Vuitton, the star brand at French luxury conglomerate LVMH Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton.

“That staying power is not based just on looks. She has a very specific look, but that’s just the first thing you see. Staying power needs a lot more than just that. And her staying power is her character, how she engages, her humanity, her intelligence, the way she relates to people, how she can talk about so many different subjects. She has gravitas,” he added.

Blanchett succeeds fellow actress Alicia Vikander, who last year fronted the brand’s first high jewelry campaign.

The “Carol” actress is pictured wearing bustier dresses accessorized with some of the star pieces from the 125-piece collection, which required more than 40,000 hours to execute. Francesca Amfitheatrof, artistic director of watches and jewelry at Vuitton, was inspired by mythical creatures including dragons and phoenixes.

The five themes within the collection — Liberty, Grace, Fantasy, Radiance and Destiny — were chosen as allegories for the spirit of the house, expressed through articulated creations and motifs of chevrons, checkerboard patterns and multiple interpretations of the house’s signature letter V.

Click image for higher resolution

“I am extremely excited to have this opportunity to collaborate with Louis Vuitton – a truly iconic House with an enormous cultural reach,” Blanchett says. “To wear the magnificent pieces created by Francesca Amfitheatrof is a bedazzling pleasure, and Nicolas Ghesquiere, as ever, amazes and inspires me.”

The campaign will launch on July 2.

Source: WWD, Grazia

More Cate Blanchett Voice Works
Posted on
Jun 22, 2022

More Cate Blanchett Voice Works

Hi, everyone!

Cate has been attached to more voice works recently. She has a voice part in Julian Rosefeldt’s most recent film installation — Euphoria. She voiced a talking and singing tiger in a supermarket. Paul Feig has also said that Cate is the narrator in Netflix’ adaptation of The School for Good and Evil.

EUPHORIA IS THE LONG-AWAITED, NEW, MULTI-DISCIPLINARY, SPATIAL FILM INSTALLATION BY THE VIDEO ARTIST AND FILM-MAKER JULIAN ROSEFELDT, WHO WOWED RUHRTRIENNALE AUDIENCES IN 2016 WITH MANIFESTO.

His new work is a tour de force that runs through the history of economic theory. The project consists of original texts from famous economists, writers, philosophers and poets, and traces the 2,000-year history of human greed. He translates the complex history of the development of our neoliberal market economy into an accessible visual language through the combination of historical texts with familiar scenic representations, in which actors like Giancarlo Esposito and Virginia Newcomb appear as contemporary characters and Cate Blanchett provides the voice for a talking, singing tiger. The project pursues the question of why capitalism appears, until now, to have no alternative and why it remains irresistible, even to people who are aware of its destructive nature, as a filmic re-enactment of both pro-capitalist and capitalist-critical positions.

Euphoria is part of Ruhrtriannale Festival (Germany) running from August 26th – September 10th 2022. More info on tickets here. It will also be shown at Park Avenue Armory in New York from November 29th 2022 until January 8th 2023 (tickets here.)

Cate Blanchett Cast as Narrator in The School for Good and Evil

 Cate Blanchett has joined the cast of Netflix’s fantasy film “The School for Good and Evil,” alongside stars Kerry Washington, Charlize Theron and Michelle Yeoh, filmmaker Paul Feig said during a conversation at the 6th Annual Women in Entertainment Summit in Los Angeles.

And actually, we just got Cate Blanchett as now the narrator, so we’re very excited about that,” Feig let slip during the fireside chat, as he listed out the star-studded female-led ensemble. “It hasn’t actually been announced yet — it’s out there.”

The Netflix Original, based on Soman Chainani’s bestselling book series, follows the relationship between two best friends, Sophie (Sophia Anne Caruso) and Agatha (Sofia Wylie) as they are swept into a fairy tale-like world. However, the girls are soon separated, as Sophie is placed under Lady Lesso’s (Theron) tutelage in the School for Evil, while Agatha is taken in by Professor Dovey (Kerry Washington) in the School for Good. The plot centers on their fight to return to each other and adventures in mystical environments.

Sources: Broadway World, Ruhrtriannale, Park Avenue Armory, The Wrap

 

World Refugee Day & Dispatches Episode Narration
Posted on
Jun 19, 2022

World Refugee Day & Dispatches Episode Narration

Good day! A new video of UNHCR Goodwill Ambassador Cate Blanchett has been released ahead of #WorldRefugeeDay tomorrow (June 20th). You can head to UNHCR.org for more information and how to donate. She also narrated an episode of Dispatches — Ukraine: Life Under Attack — about the battle for Kharkiv which is “told through the eyes of civilians and emergency workers who bore the brunt of the Russian onslaught.” The episode premieres on June 27th at 10pm BST on Channel 4.

 

 

 

Cate Blanchett on ABC 90 Celebrate
Posted on
Jun 16, 2022

Cate Blanchett on ABC 90 Celebrate

Good day, Blanchett fans!

Cate Blanchett is set to be featured in the live two-hour entertainment TV event, ABC 90 Celebrate! She has appeared in a few of ABC programmes: Police Rescue, G.P., Heartland, Rake, and most recently in #StatelessTV which she co-created and co-produced.

A first look footage for Guillermo Del Toro’s Pinocchio was shown at Annecy Film Festival and VR project, Evolver is still showing at Tribeca Film Festival. Read a review on Evolver from Independent below.

ABC 90 Celebrate!

ABC has announced a stellar lineup of famous faces set to feature in the live two-hour entertainment television event, ABC 90 Celebrate! Airing Thursday, 30 June at 8.00 pm on ABC TV and ABC iview.

Hosted by Zan Rowe, Tony Armstrong and Craig Reucassel, the broadcast will feature an exciting list of performers and presenters who are set to celebrate the value and role the ABC has held in connecting Australians for 90 years.

Throughout the evening, audiences can expect live crosses to different locations, studios and community events across the country.

Taking audiences through a nostalgic journey of the programmes and people that have made an impact across the 90 years will be an abundance of Australian entertainment legends.

The list includes Adam Liaw, Amy Shark, Annabel Crabb, Bjorn Ulaveus, Bryce Mills, Cate Blanchett, Christine Anu, Daniel Browning, Hunter Page-Lochard, Ebony Boadu, Kev Carmody, Leah Purcell, Leigh Sales, Magda Szubanski, Michael Hing, Molly Meldrum, Namilla Benson, Richard Roxburgh, Roy & HG, Ross Wilson, Steph Tisdell, Wil Anderson, and many more.

Pinocchio

Guillermo Del Toro world premiered eight minutes of footage, finished and unfinished, from his stop-motion fable about a wooden boy with a borrowed soul.

Even without the full title “Guillermo del Toro’s Pinocchio,” the film’s artistic voice would be unmistakable. In the first excerpt screened we find Geppetto encountering the newly living Pinocchio for the first time. The characters are unlike any versions we’ve seen prior. The inventor, for one, seems thoroughly soused (or at least terribly hung-over), picking himself off the floor and stumbling across his creaky workshop with bloodshot eyes.

Only something is stirring, something is upstairs, and that something announces itself with a fright. As the wooden puppet moves out of the shadows, it does so not with the upright footing of a boy but with the spindly movements of a bug. Newly brought to life, Pinocchio moves at first like a spider, using his arms as two extra legs before (presumably) learning that in order to be a real boy one should aim to be bipedal.

Cate Blanchett takes us inside the human body in an epic VR experience

Stepping through a blacked-out revolving door in Manhattan’s Financial District and into Evolver, a virtual reality exhibit about human breath, the audience is confronted by a dark concrete room. There’s an eerie, amplified natural soundscape of babbling brooks and passing storms and enormous backlit pictures that feel familiar, but with closer scrutiny prove ineffable. An indistinct image could be a Hubble telescope capture of the stars or maybe a tree’s underground roots, or even a network of human capillaries, magnified to a scale that renders the mundane fact of circulation alarming. This is, of course, the point.

Created by the London-based art collective Marshmallow Laser Feast, luxuriously narrated by Cate Blanchett, and co-executive produced by Terrence Malick, Evolver drops its audience inside the human body on the journey of an inhale. Here we follow the flow of oxygen from the outside world, through our lungs, and eventually to our distant cells. But the impression of the exhibit – which had its world premiere last week at the Tribeca Film Festival – is far less sterile than its brief. Though based on biologically accurate renderings, the result is closer to painterly mimesis than precise simulation. There’s no way the inside of my body looks this spectral and astonishing.

The exhibit acknowledges that’s a trippy question to ask, and so our first ten minutes are spent in deliciously enveloping zero gravity chair sacs, functioning like a palate cleanser. Instead of bulky VR headsets, attendees are outfitted with pillowy headphones and invited to close their eyes. Cate Blanchett then huskily murmurs in your ear about the relationship between your body and the world beyond it.

Transitions are always messy in big, interactive exhibits, but being roused from Cate Blanchett’s seductive whisper to be tightly fitted with futuristic goggles was particularly unwelcome but quickly forgotten. In the main presentation, Blanchett’s voice is replaced by a moody, natured-inflected soundtrack by Radiohead’s Jonny Greenwood, avant-garde artist Meredith Monk, late Icelandic composer Jo?hann Jo?hannsson and experimentalist Howard Skempton. It starts aloof and electronic and grows triumphantly grandiose. Visually, human breath streams and swirls around you like the Milky Way; blood vents as explosively as lava. The path of the molecules that appear to surround you can be modestly altered by swooping your hand across your body.

Virtual reality on this scale is disorienting; a watchful exhibition assistant had to save me from walking into a wall and later, another participant. It’s also stupefying – I struggled for words in the minutes immediately after and I’m told some visitors even cried. But Steel’s impossible question occasionally revisited me. Are you breathing the air, or is the wild world remaking itself in miniature inside you? Is circulation anything less beautiful than a brook that babbles within us?

Evolver won’t improve your anatomical understanding. Instead, it elevates the simple and involuntary fact of human respiration into something as extraordinary to look at as the world outside us. It accomplished something more startling than making me think about my own breath. It made me gasp.

Sources: MediaWeek; Variety; Independent

First Look at Guillermo del Toro’s Pinocchio
Posted on
Jun 14, 2022

First Look at Guillermo del Toro’s Pinocchio

Hello! Vanity Fair has released the first look at Guillermo Del Toro’s stop-motion animated version of Pinocchio. Cate is voicing a monkey named Spazzatura, the lead puppeteer of one of the main villains in the movie, Count Volpe.

Guillermo del Toro’s Pinocchio tells this truth about its otherworldly title character: he can be a little unsettling, or even scary, before you get to know him. In the Oscar-winning filmmaker’s upcoming stop-motion animated movie from Netflix, even Geppetto gets the willies when he first encounters the cheerful wooden boy clamoring around his workshop. A hallmark of del Toro’s storytelling, from Pan’s Labyrinth to Hellboy to his best-picture-winning The Shape of Water, is that beings who are initially seen as freakish, or frightening or unnatural, are often even more humane and sympathetic than the seemingly normal people who fear or scorn them.

The director always brings a slight chill before warming the heart, so his take on the living puppet comes from a gothic direction. “I’ve always been very intrigued by the links between Pinocchio and Frankenstein,” del Toro tells Vanity Fair for this exclusive first look. “They are both about a child that is thrown into the world. They are both created by a father who then expects them to figure out what’s good, what’s bad, the ethics, the morals, love, life, and essentials, on their own. I think that was, for me, childhood. You had to figure it out with your very limited experience.”

Despite that monstrous inspiration, Del Toro’s movie was crafted to be family friendly. He knows it will be challenging, but hopes his Pinocchio connects across generations and brings out a sense of compassion. “These are times that demand from kids a complexity that is tremendous. Far more daunting, I think, than when I was a child. Kids need answers and reassurances.… For me, this is for both children and adults that talk to each other. It tackles very deep ideas about what makes us human.”

His approach to this story is a significant departure from what audiences have seen previously in movies about the puppet who yearns to be a real boy.  In this version, “real” is a given. “To me, it’s essential to counter the idea that you have to change into a flesh-and-blood child to be a real human,” del Toro says. “All you need to be human is to really behave like one, you know? I have never believed that transformation [should] be demanded to gain love.”

The formally titled Guillermo del Toro’s Pinocchio aims to stand apart. For one thing, the production quality of his film is self-evident in the ornate detail of the sets and textures of the characters. And he has reinterpreted Collodi’s tale in a way that distances it from the formidable Disney adaptations. “I have been very vocal about my admiration and my great, great love for Disney all my life, but that is an impulse that actually makes me move away from that version,” del Toro says. “I think it is a pinnacle of Disney animation. It’s done in the most beautiful, hand-drawn 2D animation.”

By contrast, he notes that his own film is “a story about a puppet, with puppets—trying to seek acting from the animators in a different medium completely. We couldn’t be more different than any other version of Pinocchio in our spiritual or philosophical goals, or even the setting.”

Del Toro’s Pinocchio takes place not in a fairy-tale world, but in Italy between World War I and World War II, during the rise of fascism and authoritarian rule in the country. The wooden boy happens to come to life “in an environment in which citizens behave with obedient, almost puppet-like faithfulness,” del Toro says.

Pinocchio (voiced by newcomer Gregory Mann) is a silly, sunny personality, eager to learn about the world and meet the people who inhabit it. But his roots, quite literally, are in sadness. In del Toro’s retelling, he is carved from a tree that grew over the grave of Geppetto’s son, Carlo, whose life was cut agonizingly short years before. (In the shot at the top in which del Toro is peeking through the window, you can see the lost child’s photo in a frame on the woodcarver’s workbench.)

The heartbroken Geppetto (voiced by David Bradley of Game of Thrones and the Harry Potter movies) is still too blinded by grief to realize that his wish has come true. “He begs for another chance at being a father, but he doesn’t recognize that the essence of his own child comes back in the form of this indomitable boy,” the filmmaker says. “The main conflict within Geppetto and Pinocchio is that Geppetto wanted Carlo, who was a very well-behaved, very docile kid, and he doesn’t quite get Pinocchio, who is rowdy and wild and exuberant.”

A creature who does understand Pinocchio’s heart is Sebastian J. Cricket (voiced by Ewan McGregor), the eloquent purple insect who built a home in his trunk and continues to reside there when he comes to life. In the image below, you see not just the erudite insect, but also the tree still standing over the lost child’s resting place. “That’s the arrival of the cricket, who has been crisscrossing the world, and this is where he discovers the perfect home,” del Toro says.

Once the tree becomes a living puppet, Sebastian aspires to be a conscience for the boy (just like his alter ego in the Disney version, Jiminy Cricket) But in del Toro’s adaptation he more or less…bugs the kid. “In the beginning of the story, the cricket is full of self-importance,” the director says. “And towards the end, he’s movingly humbled and he understands that it’s not about teaching Pinocchio how to behave, but about himself learning how to behave.”

Sebastian will need more than one lesson about getting out of the way—and he gets more than one lesson. Fortunately for him he is a survivor. “One of the things I liked in the book when I read it as a kid is that the cricket keeps getting killed over and over again and crushed and maimed,” del Toro says. “In our story, the cricket gets smushed often, but it’s a journey also for the cricket to find love and humility.”

The cricket is one of the only other mystical beings in the story. “I didn’t want magical creatures other than the wood spirit that gives him life, and Pinocchio himself,” del Toro says. “I didn’t want a talking fox and a talking cat and the magic of transforming him into a donkey. I wanted everything else to feel as close as we can to the real world.”

With that in mind, one of the story’s main villains, Count Volpe (voiced by Christoph Waltz), is not an actual anthropomorphic fox, but a human whose wing-like sideburns flare up like a fox’s ears. Del Toro describes him as “a grand aristocrat that has fallen into misfortune.”

“The three main villains in the original story are the cat, the fox, and the puppeteer, and we wanted to fuse them into one,” the director says. “This is a puppeteer that has regaled the courts of Europe, and now is traveling in a down and dirty little carnival. In Pinocchio, he finds the hope to be a king, again, you know? To recreate his grand, golden years.”

He fashions an ironclad and lengthy contract, then recruits Pinocchio to join his act, performing alongside other marionettes who are controlled by Volpe’s lead puppeteer—a monkey named Spazaturra, voiced by Cate Blanchett, worships Volpe, even though he is awful to her.

Source: Vanity Fair

 

 

 

Disclaimer Update & Not Now, Not Ever Book
Posted on
Jun 14, 2022

Disclaimer Update & Not Now, Not Ever Book

Hi, everyone! It has been slow news day as we await for release of Cate’s projects this year and other news — according to Screen Daily the AppleTV+ series, Disclaimer, is still filming in London. On a more recent news, former Prime Minister (Australia) Julia Gillard is releasing a new book which would have a contribution from Cate and other feminist figures.

Disclaimer

Leslie Manville was recently announced as part of the cast of the 7-episode AppleTV+ series. Italian newspaper, il Fatto Quotidiano, is reporting that two episodes of the series will be filmed at Forte dei Marmi in Tuscany, Italy.

Here’s the list of characters the announced cast will be playing in the series:

Cate Blanchett – Catherine Ravenscroft; a successful and respected television documentary journalist whose work has been built on revealing the concealed transgressions of long-respected institutions.

Kevin Kline – Stephen Brigstocke; a widower who wrote an intriguing novel that was sent to Catherine Ravenscroft which reveals a story she had hoped was long buried in the past.

Sacha Baron Cohen – Robert Ravenscroft; Catherine’s husband who is a lawyer (role is not confirmed yet).

Kodi Smit-McPhee – Nicholas Ravenscroft; Catherine and Robert’s son (role is not confirmed yet).

Hoyeon Jung – Kim; Catherine’s assistant who is ambitious, hardworking and eager-to-please, she knows that working for Catherine is going to be her big break.

Louis Partridge – Jonathan Brigstocke; a teenager on his gap year traveling through Italy who allows himself to give in to his deeper desires with unexpected consequences.

Lesley Manville – Nancy Brigstocke, a woman devastated by her young son’s untimely death. Her life has been defined by her grief, and she lives a quiet life with her husband, Stephen.

Not Now, Not Ever Book

Julia Gillard has just announced her explosive new book Not Now, Not Ever set for release this year on 5 October 2022.

Ten years on from her famous Misogyny Speech, Gillard’s new book explores the history and culture of misogyny, while laying out a roadmap for the future. While the past ten years have undeniably seen many changes – and improvements – there is still a long way to go.

With contributions from several authors and experts, the book explores the reality of misogyny in 2022 and provides a look back at how the Misogyny Speech has inspired women since 2012.

With plenty to explore, the book is a well-rounded and highly-anticipated read for anyone hoping to understand the effects of misogyny on modern society. Kathy Lette looks into how the speech has resurfaced on TikTok, while Cate Blanchett, Brittany Higgins and more recall their first time hearing it. Next-generation feminists Sally Scales, Chanel Contos, and Caitlin Figuerado provide inspiring insight, and of course, the echoes of the rallying cry ring through each page: Not now, not ever!

Sources: ScreenDaily; il Fatto Quotidiano; Penguin Books; Variety

VR Project ‘Evolver’ narrated by Cate Blanchett
Posted on
Jun 9, 2022

VR Project ‘Evolver’ narrated by Cate Blanchett

Hi, everyone! The trailer for Evolver which is a “VR Journey of Life and Breath” has been released. The VR project is narrated by Cate Blanchett and is showing at Tribeca Film Festival. She is also an executive producer through Dirty Films.

Cate Blanchett (“Carol”) and Terrence Malick (“The Tree of Life”) have reteamed on “Evolver,” a VR free-roaming, music-filled interactive and transcendental experience which is world premiering at the Tribeca Film Festival.

Produced by the artist collective Marshmallow Laser Feast (“We Live in an Ocean of Air”) in the U.K., Atlas V (“Spheres”) in France and Pressman Film (“The Crow”) in the U.S., “Evolver” is a pioneering experience taking audiences inside the landscape of the body, following the flow of oxygen through a branching ecosystem, to a single ‘breathing’ cell. The experience has been conceived to be replicated and sized up in festivals and museums around the world and can host up to 100 people at the same.

Veteran producer Edward R. Pressman is executive producing with his long-time friend Malick as well as Blanchett, Coco Francini and Andrew Upton through their banner Dirty Films. Pressman and Malick’s first creative collaboration dates back to 1973 with Malick’s feature debut “Badlands.”

Blanchett, who previously worked with Malick on “Knight of Cups” and “Voyage of Time,” was approached by the filmmaker to join “Evolver” and has given it a greater spiritual depth. Blanchett narrates the experience, starting meditation phase during which she reads a poem created by Daisy Lafarge and guides audiences as they connect with their own bodies and the natural world through a cycle of respiration.

“Voicing Evolver was not so much building a character but creating an atmosphere or a state of mind,” Blanchett told Variety. “Working with Marshmallow Laser Feast, I responded not only to the arresting visuals but the resonant poetry of Daisy Lafarge’s text,” Blanchett added.

Blanchett said “Evolver” shares similar themes as “Voyage of Time” as it reflects on the meaning of life. “It’s been an extraordinary thing to be in Terry’s orbit. The thrum of his world view is intoxicating and any chance to be in a dialogue with him I leap towards with open arms,” said Blanchett about reuniting with Malick. “Giving voice to ‘Voyage of Time’ was an eye-opening meditation and Evolver is a wonderful extension of that conversation,” said the Oscar-winning actor.

While Blanchett has voiced several animated features in the past, this marked her first time narrating a VR experiment.

“VR is obviously a much more immersive experience than conventional animation, which the Evolver team has harnessed to a spectacular degree.”

Blanchett described “Evolver” as an “immersive experience on a metaphysical level that” and said she thinks it will “take the participants on a dynamic journey as the work is simultaneously inward and outward facing, encouraging deep introspection and reflection but also inviting people to connect, not only to their own bodies but to the natural world around them.”

Source: Variety

 

 

 

Cate Blanchett at LVMH Prize 2022
Posted on
Jun 2, 2022

Cate Blanchett at LVMH Prize 2022

Happy Friday, Blanchett fans!

Yesterday, Cate had a short trip to Paris where she was made ambassador at this year’s LVMH Prize. She presented the Young Fashion Designer Award to Steven Stokey Daley. Check out the photos, videos, and articles below!

Thank you to Frauke and Bronte for their donation to the site!

LVMH PRIZE 2022

By my watch it was 2:49 pm at the Louis Vuitton Fondation in Paris when Cate Blanchett delivered the news: “I know I speak for everyone in wishing the winner a long and fulfilling career. So, the 2022 LVMH Prize for Young Fashion Designer goes to… SS Daley!” The audience whooped as Steven Stokey Daley, 25, stepped up onto the stage in his voluminous khaki collection trench coat to accept the fancy golden award. As with everything else over the last 48 hours spent here prepping for this moment—sleep-time excepted—Daley delivered his speech with aplomb. “This is like an Oscar, so thanks Cate! I genuinely didn’t expect to win, so thanks to everyone who supported me.”

Shortly after she handed Daley that fancy award, Cate Blanchett said: “I wasn’t part of the judging process, I just joined at the last minute. Which is interesting because you can make decisions based on your own personal taste. But it’s an entirely different process when you understand as a juror you have someone’s career and development at stake… Because everyone can have an amazing moment and there are so many breakouts, but can they sustain the brutality of the fashion industry?”

Left to Right: Jonathan Anderson, Nicolas Ghesquière, Sidney Toledano, Maria Grazia Chiuri, Cate Blanchett, Bernard Arnault, Silvia Venturini Fendi, Delphine Arnault, Stella McCartney, Jean-Paul Claverie, Kim Jones, and Nigo

Delphine Arnault announces: “I am very happy that Steven Stokey Daley, has won the LVMH 2022 Prize for his brand S.S. Daley.  He appropriates the codes of tailoring by playing with the clichés of upper-class English culture. This year, the jury has decided to award the Karl Lagerfeld Prize to the designer Eli Russell Linnetz for his brand ERL who draws from the culture of Venice Beach and his native California, to create joyful, cool and sensual clothes, and to Idris Balogun for Winnie New York, who revamps the codes of a colourful elegance, inspired by the staples of menswear.

I would like to congratulate all the finalists and I applaud their outstanding talent and creativity. I am also very grateful to Cate Blanchett and Eileen Gu for being here today, both of whom are outstanding in their own fields and an inspiration to us all. Finally, I would like to thank the members of the exceptional Jury for their involvement in this edition and for their support to young creation.”

Sources: Vogue; LVMH