Category: Interviews

Cate Blanchett: “Everyone Gets Obsessed With Anti-Aging” #SKII

One more promotional interview for SK II and a new beautiful photo!

It took Winter Storm Stella to prove what we’ve long suspected:

Cate Blanchett is fucking hardcore.

The acclaimed actress is dressed, glossed, and ready to go at 10 am, despite blizzard conditions shutting down Manhattan. She insists she’ll perform as scheduled in the stage hit The Present, even if half the audience will be stuck home in New Jersey. She gamely talks about politics, Rihanna, and day-old eyeliner as the wind hits 70 mph outside. And she knows a lot about skincare, too, which is good because we’re here for SK-II’s latest launch.

It’s a version of their famous Facial Treatment Essence, decked with flowers and designed for Mother’s Day gifting. Called “Sakura” after Japan’s famous cherry blossom season, the limited-edition bottle hits Sephora this week—just as Blanchett, SK-II’s most famous spokeswoman, wraps her six-month run on Broadway.

We grabbed our sled dogs and mushed uptown for the chance to meet Blanchett in person. (Yes, she looks exactly the same as she does onscreen. Yes, we were nervous. Yes, that means we asked really random questions… Would you have it any other way?)

You’ve played two immortal characters: Galadriel in ‘Lord of the Rings,’ and Hela, the goddess of death, in the upcoming ‘Thor’ movie. Is there a skincare technique you use to look immortal onscreen? Some sort of seriously ageless primer?

Okay, that’s really interesting. An ageless primer… hmm… Well, first I need to give credit to my amazing makeup artist Morag Ross. I’ve worked with her for years, and she’s truly a genius. And I will say that she’s used the SK-II mist to help set my looks, because it’s hydration but not shiny. I can’t stand powder, and feeling dry on my face. This mist, I guess it is sort of an immortal primer, if you want to call it that, because it keeps the glow but also seals my makeup look in. And I’ll tell you that when I first started meeting with the Thor team about Hela, they wanted her to wear a mask the whole time.

No! She’s too cool for that.

Well, Morag and I had gone on YouTube and found all these incredible Hela makeup looks that women all over the world had done, as fans. They showed her face, and they imagined it was sort of necrotized, and it was so powerful. So I said, “Don’t you want to know what she looks like without her mask? Isn’t that more interesting?” And Morag did such an incredible job with the makeup that I think you’ll get to see my the character’s face a lot more.

What does the goddess of death get to wear?

Morag worked a lot with iridescent powders and veins in the face—I mean, she’s the goddess of death. She has to look striking, obviously.

She’s also got some serious after-party eyeliner happening.

Good, that’s what we were going for! I mean, she’s been locked in a closet for millennia.



How do you get makeup like that off, after you’ve been filming for twelve hours straight?

You know, this is a true story: I spoke to SK-II years ago and [requested] an eye makeup remover, exactly because of things like that! And they gave me this oil cleanser, and it’s what I always use on-set and onstage.

This Sakura bottle is meant for Mother’s Day. But how do you give your mother a skincare product without the implication that she needs help in the beauty department?

I mean, my mother asks for it! She’s very happy when I come back from an SK-II press trip. This is the thing: I’ve got friends in their 20’s who use anti-aging facial treatments. I’ve been using mine for over 15 years. Everyone gets obsessed with anti-aging but I’d rather look as good as I can at the age I am. And the thing about the facial treatment essence is there’s no other product like it because it’s about clarity, tone, texture, and what I’ve found is it’s given my skin elasticity. Which is great for anti-aging, but it’s not the only benefit. So if you have someone who’s sensitive about it, maybe just spin it away from aging. Say something like, “This is for you, to make you feel good.” Also, it’s very pretty. The cherry blossoms on the bottle really make it look like a gift, although do you give gifts to yourself?

Of course.

Good, I do, too. I have SK-II products all over my house.

Do they ever go missing, like after you have a party?

You know, I have a friend—she works in the beauty industry—and she lines up scents in her bathroom. So when you go visit her, you can try something new, and I quite like that. So if you want to try one of my products, that’s out in full view, go for it. But if your friends are stealing your beauty products, you might want to get new friends. Or stop having parties where you don’t know everyone.

Have you thrown a rager recently?

It’s been a while. But I do think, also, that there used to be something illicit about a woman’s beauty regimen, where it had to be a “secret,” and so sometimes people would snoop because everyone’s products were behind closed doors. And I’m incredibly open about that stuff. All my friends know what I use. They’re already stocked up.

Can you talk about Ocean’s Eight at all? Did you get to pick pockets like Matt Damon?

Oh, my character doesn’t get to rob people like that. At one point, and I don’t know whether it’s in the movie or not, but I had to learn to ride a motorbike. And I did have to play a lot of poker. That’s what my character does, she plays poker. So I would play all the time with Sandra [Bullock].

Did you win?

I’ve got a really good poker face, to be honest. You just have to blank your eyes. But the bluffing of poker is where the pleasure really is, at least for me. But you know who’s a really good poker player? Ben Affleck. He is world class, as they say. I’m not there yet.

My mom plays poker, and she’s amazing. But she says sometimes people can’t read her, just because they don’t expect a woman at the table…

The idea of women playing poker, they’re not given a lot of credit. People underestimate you. Women have the power to ambush in that situation, and there’s a lot of fun and pleasure in that. But I just wish we had power, full-stop.

We’re fighting for it. We won’t stop.

Yeah, but we’ve been working on it for a couple of Millennia now. It’s been a long time since universal suffrage, and I’m sick of the old white men running the show.

What do you think is the way forward? A strike?

We have to band together, but the thing in this country is that people are terrified of losing their jobs… Maybe California needs to secede. The only thing that’ll make any difference is the money… Tax dollars and losing that amount of money. It’s one of the most economically powerful states, isn’t it? That’s where it hurts.

What about through the arts? Should political stories be given more exposure right now? What can artists do?

You know, I was talking to a theater director who I really rate. He was saying some work is overly political. If you were doing a production of Richard III right now, it wouldn’t be anything but political. But then some work deals with the kind of timeless undertones of being human. And I think it’s really important to embrace both types of work, because culture civilizes us, and that’s why every single despotic regime has tried to smash [the arts]. Because art civilizes us and it connects us and activates us. And so it’s really important to connect with compassion, with stories about people who are different from us. Moonlight is an astonishing film because it’s not overtly political, but it’s human. And that’s why it had such a big trajectory, because in the current climate, things that are true, brave human stories become political.

Many women love music festivals, art openings, ballets… but it’s harder to get some people to go see a play. What’s your advice for theater newbies?

The first thing is to accept that theater is an unknown. If you go to a concert, you know the music. If you go to an art show, you can literally see the art on your phone before you see it in person. But with theater, often times people aren’t prepared to take risks, even though that’s exactly what’s great about it. So go get a rush seat to a play, or get a really cheap ticket through an online promotion or because it’s a smaller theater. The great thing about theater is that when it’s great, you’ll remember it for the rest of your life. But if you go see ten shows, you’ll only get five—if you’re lucky—that’ll give you that experience. But the rest, at the very least, will be interesting. You will not leave the theater with nothing to talk about. For me, comedy and tragedy when you get them both in one evening, that’s the most satisfying. So I’d say, look for that.

Benedict Cumberbatch had to tell audiences to stop filming ‘Hamlet’ on their phones. Do you see smartphones onstage when you’re performing in ‘The Present’?

You do sometimes! I know actors who have stopped the show. I haven’t done that yet, but at the same time, you know, I just don’t understand it. To record something on your iPhone to be watched later, that’s like the opposite of theater. The joy of being there is experiencing it with other people. It doesn’t translate onto your phone. It’s about being present. And I can absolutely see you if you’ve got your phone up. You can’t hide it from us.

Last question: How’s Rihanna as an actress?

Oh, she’s honestly great! She’s really open and humble, and she’s got a great sense of humor. She’s got a really dry wit about her. And she’s really relaxed and natural.

Did she beat you at poker?

She never got to play! Her character is more of a computer person. But if she did start playing poker, I bet she’d be really good at it. Really good.

via Elle Magazine

‘Thor: Ragnarok’: Cate Blanchett Took Inspiration From Cosplayers for Hela’s Look

Hi everyone!

In this new interview, Cate discusses the sources of inspiration for Hela’s look. Enjoy the reading!

Interviews
‘Thor: Ragnarok’: Cate Blanchett Took Inspiration From Cosplayers for Hela’s Look

Yahoo Movies Donna FreydkinYahoo MoviesMarch 17, 2017

Cate Blanchett as Hela in Thor: Ragnarok.
Cate Blanchett as Hela in Thor: Ragnarok. (Photo: Marvel)
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She’s played Queen Elizabeth, Bob Dylan, and elven royalty. So perhaps one of the few acting challenges left for Cate Blanchett is tackling a comic-book villain. She’s about to prove her Marvel mettle this fall as Hela, the Asgardian goddess of death who’ll wreak havoc in the November Avenger sequel Thor: Ragnarok.

Hela, who has had multiple incarnations in the comics, usually wears an elaborate headdress, but Blanchett also gave a lot of thought to how she’d look without her gear — and took some inspiration from fans online.

“When I was starting to think about how she might look, I went back to the fanbase,” said Blanchett, who recently spoke to Yahoo. “All these girls were doing Hela makeup looks on YouTube. I thought about what their takes on her were. I spoke to Marvel about what she would look like when she would be unmasked, so she wasn’t a faceless, generic baddie. They were very open to everything.”

Blanchett was first drawn to the project by director Taika Waititi and “his unique, slightly askew take on the universe,” she said. In Ragnarok, our hero, Thor (Chris Hemsworth), will battle Hela when she’s inadvertently unleashed on Asgard after spending millennia locked away. The scale of destruction that she represents is enough to unite the god of thunder with his seriously estranged brother Loki (Tom Hiddleston) and his Avenger rival the Hulk (Mark Ruffalo), who’s along for this intergalactic ride.

The Marvel universe “needed a bit of a shakeup,” the actress said. “I didn’t realize until I got on the set that this is the first Marvel film incarnation of a female villain. What decade are we in? It was shocking to me. The character they created is ballsy and front-footed.” Hela also happens to be the reason Blanchett, 47, has some new street cred with her four children. “I earned a few brownie points,” she bragged.

via Yahoo

[Interviews] Cate Blanchett shares a few of her favorite things #SKII

Hello everyone!

Two more promotional interviews with Cate for SK II. Enjoy the reading!

Cate Blanchett Loves Japanese Skin Care, Italian Food, And Rick Owens Onesies

“Look, I am really interested in fashion, but not when it comes to skin care,” deadpanned Cate Blanchett, the Oscar-winning actor who recently decamped from her native Australia to New York City for her Broadway debut in The Present.

The red carpet risk taker, who regularly earns a spot atop every best dressed list, admitted to being far less daring when it comes to maintaining her poreless complexion. “I’ve learned that when you find something that works, you stick with it,” she said during a blizzardy afternoon as we discussed her longtime role as brand ambassador of SK-II.

Just in time for Mother’s Day, SK-II is releasing a limited edition bottle of its cult favorite (read on to hear Blanchett wax poetic about its nourishing effects) Facial Treatment Essence festively decorated with flowering cherry blossoms. “Isn’t it beautiful,” Blanchett said of the design. “It fits perfectly with the Japanese heritage of SK-II.”

We asked Blanchett to fill in our T&C Questionnaire, and she let us in on her skin care secrets (you’ll want to take notes) and Mother’s Day traditions, while sharing the surprisingly practical ensemble that has been getting her through this New York winter.

What is the beauty product you can’t stop talking about?

Well, I have been using the SK-II essence for about 15 years now and was thrilled when they finally released it as a mist last year. I have been at them for about 10 years to put it in a spray dispenser because that’s what I have always done when I’m traveling. If I could only take one product with me, it would be that. I also love to use it during particularly long hours on a film set. Rather than putting makeup on again, you can just refresh it and feel hydrated. It sets makeup without leaving that powdery look.

I also use the SK-II LXP serum, eye cream, and moisturizer morning and night. And since I am on stage [in The Present] at the moment, I am using the oil cleanser. Ordinarily, I would use the gel cleanser, but the cleansing oil really takes everything off. I am removing makeup three times a night, eight times a week. My eye area takes a bit of beating, but the oil cleanser is really gentle.

When I’m on a film set, I feel the need to exfoliate because I am wearing my makeup so much longer. SK-II doesn’t do an exfoliator, so I use one from Dermalogica or this Australian company called Intraceuticals.

What is most important to you: skin care, makeup, or fragrance?

I could go without wearing makeup for sure. Skin is the largest organ in the body, so if your skin is feeling healthy, then you feel brighter and more positive about entering the day. If you’ve got an allergy or an outbreak, then you are going to feel slightly less get up and go. And then fragrance really alters your mood. Those two things are really important to me.

I am very lazy when it comes to makeup—I guess because I spend a lot of time in it portraying other people. So when I am just me, I use mascara. And if it’s a big, exciting day, I’ll wear some lipstick.

Do you have a favorite fragrance?

I worked with an actor on stage years ago, who changed her fragrance depending on the role, and I thought that was very interesting. For instance, when I was on stage with Isabelle Huppert [in The Maids], she gave me a fragrance that she had designed with a fragrance house, so I wore it and it became the scent I associated with that story and that character. I am currently wearing Giorgio Armani Sì [editor’s note: Blanchett is a spokesperson for the fragrance] on stage because the character is very of optimistic and outward looking and forward thinking, so that feels like a very positive way to enter the role.

What’s your favorite restaurant in New York? Sydney?

There is a Japanese restaurant that I love. It’s a bit of an underground one in Tudor City. And then there is an Italian spot called Il Buco that is down on Bond Street. It’s the one we’ve probably been to most. In Sydney, likewise, it’s an Italian restaurant called Buon Ricordo.

What is your favorite place to vacation?

This year, I’m looking forward to going home to Australia.

What is your best travel hack?

Besides packing my SK-II mist, I put electrolytes in my water to help keep hydrated and bounce back after a flight.

Is there anyone who makes you feel star struck?

Gosh, lots of people, but Meryl Streep for sure.

What is your favorite movie? Theater production?

That’s like asking who your favorite child is! You know what I saw recently that has really stayed with me is Martin Scorsese’s Silence. Theater is trickier because once we’re on stage, we are in sync with all of the other shows and I don’t get to see anything. While we were in rehearsals, I went and saw as much as I could. I really loved Ivo van Hove’s Kings of War.

When I feel like I have nothing to wear, I reach for ________.

I went to Tokio 7 on the Lower East Side recently. It’s got second hand clothing on consignment, and I found an unworn Rick Owens onesie. I’ve been wearing that and a pair of Acne boots.

What is your go-to drink?

Grapefruit juice and vodka.

Do you have any Mother’s Day traditions?

Mother’s Day has always been far more important to my mother than her birthday. We never really were allowed to celebrate her birthday, but we would celebrate Mother’s Day. It’s all about something that you write—a message that you write. It’s always a big celebration, and we have a lot of May birthdays in my family, so we do try to gather. If it’s not on the day, we try to have a Mother’s Day celebration close to the day.

Fill in the blank: People are most likely to come to me for advice about _________.

Skin care!

What is the best advice you ever received?

To quote a drama teacher from school, “If you are going to fail, fail gloriously.”

How cate blanchett maintains her crazy-glowy skin while traveling

Though Cate Blanchett wasn’t the one reverse-aging in The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, you could say she’s doing it IRL. The Australian beauty and Oscar-winning actress’ porcelain skin has remained virtually unchanged over the course of her uber-successful career.

Besides starting her day with lemon water (a celeb fave), wearing minimal makeup, and always covering up with sunscreen, the star revealed another key beauty secret that keeps her glowing—no matter how often she has to fly for work.

In a recent interview with Allure, Blanchett revealed how she deals with the dreaded (and drying) air on airplanes: She’s all about doing treatments mid-flight.

“I mask on the plane, but I wait until the lights go off,” she says (relatable to those of us who don’t quite have the guts to look like a scary movie villain in front of a bunch of strangers). “Although sometimes I’m so desperate I can’t wait, so I’ll put an eye mask on.”

Blanchett also notes that she keeps a facial mist with her for up-in-the-air skin refreshers. Hey, doing your beauty routine at 40,000 feet isn’t the craziest thing celebrities do while they travel—it’s not like Blanchett has her SoulCycle bike in tow, a la Lady Gaga. And let’s face it: You definitely can’t argue with her results.

via Town and Country & Well and Good

Cate Blanchett reveals her beauty routine secrets #SKII

Cate Blanchett reveals her beauty routine secrets #SKII

Hi everyone!

Last Tuesday, Sephora released a new photo of Cate promoting SK II. She is currently promoting the SK-II Mother’s Day Limited Edition Facial Treatment Essence. Also, two new promotional interviews with Cate Blanchett for the brand are available. Enjoy the reading!

Cate Blanchett’s Secret to Great Skin? Consistency

It’s not every day that a skin-care company crafts a product made specifically with you in mind. But then again, not everyone is Cate Blanchett. (A sad, but deeply true fact.) The 47-year-old actor, who has been the gorgeous, glow-y face of SK-II for 15 years, and was the inspiration behind the super-luxe Japanese skin-care brand’s recent Mid-Day Essence face spray, is still—if not more—in love with her beloved brand. As she tells Allure, it’s the reason her skin is the way it is today (again: gorgeously glow-y and virtually wrinkle-free), along with keeping a consistent routine, wearing lots of sunscreen, and letting the aging process, well, happen. Here, we’ve highlighted Blanchett’s best advice for obtaining skin like hers, which is, without question, the definition of immaculate.

1. Stay consistent.

How to Minimize the Appearance of Stretch Marks, According to Dermatologists
“I love clothes and the idea of changing your hair and what you’re wearing—but I don’t do that with my skin. It’s a very different thing. I think consistency is a big part of making your skin more resilient. Since I’ve been using SK-II—my skin has taken a lot of beatings being on stage, having four children, working in fil, and traveling—and I feel like it’s a lot more stable. And I can only attribute that to the consistency of using SK-II for a long time.”

2. Wear your sunscreen.

“I’m eternally grateful that my mother always encouraged me to stay out of the sun and wear sunscreen [when I was growing up]. With very pale skin, it was especially important not to become a bronzed sun bunny. I think 90 percent of people who have issues with their skin—health-wise and also in terms of satisfaction with their complexion—are actually talking about sun damage.”

3. Don’t give into the pressure.

“I’m not a model, and I certainly was never the gorgeous girl in school. So I never thought about myself in terms of my looks. My looks have been a tool rather than the end result. They’re part of who I am, but they’re not all of who I am. I feel much more pressure to do my job properly, which is to tell the story and create an interesting character. That’s what I feel the pressure to do—look like the character versus look younger. It’s a high road to nowhere, really. The only thing you can do is look the best you can. The rest is invisible people talking on the internet—and I don’t really listen to that.”

4. Mask away—wherever you are.

“I mask on the plane, but I wait until the lights go off. Although, sometimes I’m so desperate I can’t wait, so I’ll put an eye mask on and the SK-II Facial Treatment Mask. But, up until recently, I was decanting the Facial Treatment Essence into a spray bottle, but now they’ve come out with [the Mid-Day Essence], so I’ll take that on the plane with me.”

5. Take your vitamins.

“I’ve always been big on the vitamins my children take, but I was erratic on my own, so now I’m trying to fix that. That’s my promise to myself this year—I’m going to be much more regular. I’ve just started taking a liquid skin vitamin, called Aethern Advanced Skin Beauty Program. I’ve already noticed my skin is a little brighter.”

6. Don’t give into the pressure.

“I’m not a model, and I certainly was never the gorgeous girl in school. So I never thought about myself in terms of my looks. My looks have been a tool rather than the end result. They’re part of who I am, but they’re not all of who I am. I feel much more pressure to do my job properly, which is to tell the story and create an interesting character. That’s what I feel the pressure to do—look like the character versus look younger. It’s a high road to nowhere, really. The only thing you can do is look the best you can. The rest is invisible people talking on the internet—and I don’t really listen to that.”

Cate Blanchett’s Refreshingly Real Beauty Mantra: ‘Work With What You’ve Got’

There’s age-denying. There’s age-defying. And then there’s Cate Blanchett, the two-time Oscar winner who defines what it means to own your beauty.

“You’re going to get wrinkles. You’re going to get older. I’m married to a man who’s attracted to me — and has been attracted to me over the years,” Blanchett, 47, tells Yahoo Beauty. “I’m fortunate that I’m around people who feel similarly.”

The mother of Ignatius, Dashiell, Roman, and Edith Upton doesn’t sweat all the bells and whistles that come with being famous. When she was eight months pregnant, she was fitted for her Dries van Noten Oscars dress in 2008 in just one quick session — and killed it on the red carpet.

During a BAFTA pre-Oscars event years ago in Hollywood, Blanchett laughingly showed off one of her tattoos — located in a hidden spot. Workwise, she vacillates between stage (co-starring in The Present, written by her husband, Andrew Upton) and screen, where she just wrapped the lady-heavy Ocean’s Eight, co-starring Mindy Kaling and Sandra Bullock.

“I got to work with those fabulous ladies. I was so excited to be working with them. I wasn’t prepared for how much I would be madly in love with them all. It was an amazing experience,” she says.

Her work speaks volumes, but her face tells a whole other story. Blanchett is the spokeswoman for the luxe brand SK-II, a skin care partnership that happened organically more than 15 years ago. Mary Greenwell, Blanchett’s longtime makeup artist, introduced her to the Facial Treatment Essence, which cleared up her skin when Blanchett was going through a rough spell. She’s been swearing by the brand ever since, and is currently promoting the SK-II Mother’s Day Limited Edition Facial Treatment Essence.

“That’s the cornerstone of the whole brand. I started using the product when I was pregnant with my first son, who’s now 15 going on 16. I started to notice changes in my skin. I was getting a bit of melasma,” she says.

She’s referring to patchy skin discoloration that can occur on the face, often during pregnancy. Today, says Blanchett, “My skin is in better condition than when I was in my early 30s. I have a clear, simple morning and evening ritual. I use the essence, and I generally use the LXP Ultimate Revival Serum and LXP Ultimate Revival Cream. I’ve been working with [the brand] officially for about 13 years. I wish I’d discovered it in my 20s.”

Blanchett embodies inner beauty, focusing on the interior, as opposed to the exterior. Aging, she sums up, is going to happen anyway, so why shun it? “You can’t run from it. There’s a level of scrutiny around the way women look, and it’s really unhelpful. Everyone will have a different relationship to their looks.”

She obliquely refers to plastic surgery and her aversion to it: “I didn’t grow up in an environment where the older women did that stuff. It doesn’t sit comfortably with me. Work with what you’ve got. Otherwise, no matter how much you try and change yourself, if you feel panicked, it will radiate through. I wear less makeup now than I did in my 20s. I stay out of the sun.”

Yes, but she’s also down for a libation when life calls for it. “One always looks better when you don’t drink coffee or when you’ve done a detox. Life is stressful, and sometimes it’s easier to have one glass of wine than do eight yoga classes. Life is never perfect. You have to do the best you can,” says Blanchett.

She’s passing the same lesson along to her daughter, Edith. “Maybe it’s because I’ve had three boys. I wasn’t done having children. I kept all the boys’ clothes. So she’s wearing the boys’ clothes. Once again, that’s how I grew up. I grew up just being. It doesn’t matter what she wears. It’s about who she is, not what she looks like.”

via Allure & Yahoo Beauty

Thor: Ragnarok: Meet Cate Blanchett’s Hela, the franchise’s first female villain

New interview with Cate for Entertainment Weekly! Enjoy!

Cate Blanchett doesn’t really feel like she needs to explain her character Hela in Thor: Ragnarok — she’s the Goddess of Death. Quips the actress, “I think that’s where you put the period in the sentence, right? She arrives with a lot of baggage. She’s a little bit cross.”

Hela is more than “a little bit cross” as she is freed from her prison early in Ragnarok and causes all sorts of chaos befitting her name. “She’s been locked away for millennia, getting more and more cross, and then, with a mistake, she get unleashed and she ain’t getting back in that box,” says Blanchett.

Hela may be a monster, but Blanchett is a delight and clearly had a blast tapping into her dark side. EW talked to the two time Oscar-winner about playing Thor’s first female villain and making weapons out of her body.

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: What made you want to be part of this?
CATE BLANCHETT: Well let’s face it: as a woman, these opportunities have not in the past come up very frequently and I think there’s a revolution happening from within Marvel. I’ve seen so many of the Marvel franchises, particularly being the mother of four. They tend to be the only type of film particularly having young boys. But for me as an actor, this is separate is my desire to work with [director] Taika Waititi.

How did he sell you on this?
Well I had seen his vampire movie [What We Do in the Shadows] and Hunt for the Wilderpeople. I was trying to get my head around the collision of his sensibility as a director and what had previously existed in the Thor franchise and I thought that’s going to be interesting to say the least and I thought it could produce an interesting combustible connection because tonally his work is so different from what previously existed. Obviously they wanted to do something fresh and different, which is always exciting.

What was it like working with Taika? What does he bring to this?
He’s sort of part sumo wrestler, part showgirl, part father you always wanted to have. He’s so nimble. I keep saying the word irreverent. He takes the work seriously but he doesn’t take himself seriously. So there’s music on set the whole time. There was hilarity but he knew every single time when to focus.

Your Thor’s first female villain. Was that part of the appeal?
Can you believe it? Can you believe we’re having this conversation and it’s 2017 and we’re talking about the first female villain? It’s ridiculous. There’s so much untapped potential villainy in women. It’s really exciting. I think finally it’s beginning to be acknowledged that women and men want to see a diverse array of characters, and that’s race, gender across the sexual spectrum.

Did you go back and read the comics and look at old versions of Hela?
Oh yes. I mean, you gotta know the history of the character. And there are so many iterations of the origin story. For any of these characters, there’s never one origin story. But yes, it was really interesting to go back. Most of the time she was masked. So that’s what I really talked to the Marvel team and Taika about was when we would chose to have her masked and when she wouldn’t be masked.

And that headdress is more than just an accessory right?
Yeah. She’s able to manifest weapons. Her headdress can be weapons. She can manifest weapons out of different parts of her body. I won’t tell you which — I’ll leave that hanging.

Hela comes in and sort of takes control of Asgard away from Loki, right?
Well, Asgard is so good. I mean one only need to have a mildly unpleasant thought and you’re considered evil. Everyone is too perfect. Why not mess it all up? It’s easy to play bad but, like when I was in Cinderella, like what makes the stepmother evil is interesting. So, it was trying to in the screen time I had to tease that stuff and to give her a journey really. So hopefully we’re given her a journey, like how you understand why Loki is as screwed up as he is. Hopefully, there’s that satisfaction in watching Hela.

Do you have fight scenes?
There’s a bit of wire work. I worked with the legend Zoe Bell (Grindhouse). I did as much as was humanly possible for a middle-aged mother of four [laughs]. I learned so much. All sorts of capoeira stuff. All the stunts and the fights were really interestingly choreographed. But I did train, ostensibly, so I wouldn’t injure myself.

via EW

Video – Cate Blanchett at The Late Show with Stephen Colbert

Video – Cate Blanchett at The Late Show with Stephen Colbert

On March 3, Cate Blanchett visited The Late Show with Stephen Colbert to promote The Present, on Broadway until March 19. Watch the full interview below. We’ve added also screencaps, stills and candids. Enjoy!





www.instagram.com/colbertlateshow/

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Cate Blanchett on BBC Radio tomorrow

Cate Blanchett on BBC Radio tomorrow

Good morning! Cate Blanchett promotes The Present in the new episode of The Art Hour on air on BBC UK Radio. Don’t miss her tomorrow (March 5th) a little after 4 p.m. local time. If you can’t, don’t worry, reruns calendar is here

Treize facettes de Cate Blanchett scintillent aux Beaux-Arts

New interview with Cate Blanchett for Le Monde newspaper about the installation Manifesto currently in exhibition at Le Palais des Beaux-Arts in Paris. Enjoy the reading! (if you can read French)

L’école parisienne accueille l’installation de Julian Rosefeldt « Manifesto », dans laquelle l’actrice incarne différents personnages

Elle apparaît successivement sous les traits d’un clochard, d’une PDG, d’une présentatrice de journal télévisé ou bien encore d’une institutrice. Parfois méconnaissable, l’actrice australienne Cate Blanchett déploie toute la palette de son talent à travers Manifesto, la production de l’artiste allemand Julian Rosefeldt, qui, après Melbourne, Berlin et New York est présentée pour la première fois en France du 24 février au 20 avril aux Beaux-Arts de Paris.
Cette installation regroupe treize écrans, sur lesquels l’actrice joue autant de personnages, qui scandent des monologues élaborés à partir de manifestes d’artistes célèbres du XXe siècle. « Cette culture ne sera pas dominée par le besoin de laisser des traces », clame le clochard au milieu d’une friche industrielle, reprenant le Manifeste situationniste écrit par Guy Debord en 1960.
Sur un autre écran, une femme prononce une oraison funèbre : « Je suis contre les systèmes, le plus acceptable des systèmes est celui de n’en avoir par principe aucun », affirme-t-elle derrière sa mantille, récitant le Manifeste Dada de Tristan Tzara. Un peu plus loin, une marionnettiste coiffée d’un bonnet cite André Breton : « L’acte surréaliste le plus simple consiste, revolvers aux poings, à descendre dans la rue et à tirer au hasard, tant qu’on peut, dans la foule. »
Des textes du cinéaste Jim Jarmusch, de l’architecte Bruno Taut ou du peintre Vassily Kandinsky sont ainsi mis en scène et assemblés comme dans un collage dont la vocation est de leur redonner une nouvelle vie en les plongeant au cœur de la société contemporaine.
Ce travail est le fruit d’une rencontre qui remonte à 2010, à Berlin, lorsque Cate Blanchett fait la connaissance de Julian Rosefeldt par l’entremise du metteur en scène allemand Thomas Ostermeier. L’idée qu’ils travaillent ensemble est immédiate, mais ce n’est que quatre ans plus tard que le projet entre véritablement dans le concret quand Rosefeldt veut monter quelque chose autour d’une poignée de manifestes qu’il venait de lire.
« Il m’a appelée un jour, alors que je jouais à Lyon Les Bonnes, de Jean Genet, avec Isabelle Huppert », raconte Cate Blanchett, qui nous reçoit dans sa loge du Barrymore Theatre à New York où elle fait actuellement ses débuts à Broadway dans The Present, une adaptation par Andrew Upton de Platonov,une pièce de Tchekhov.

« Une expérience “fast and furious” » […]


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Cate Blanchett Doesn’t Need to Be the Star of the Show

Hello everybody! New interview for Vanity Fair!

The Oscar-winner on her Broadway debut in The Present—and which Shakespearean role she yearns to tackle


When she isn’t delighting late-night revelers with surprise performances at drag shows, Cate Blanchett is spending her time in New York on the Broadway stage. Currently one of the stars of The Present—a reworking of an infrequently produced early Anton Chekhov play about a rather disastrous birthday party, adapted by Blanchett’s husband, Andrew Upton—Blanchett took a break from her hectic schedule to talk with us about the play, and how she views her role in such productions. Blanchett says she’s much happier being a member of the ensemble—even if, sure, her specific role in The Present maybe got a little plumping.

“It’s not a great role in the original writing. It’s very peripheral,” Blanchett told us over the phone. “Andrew has set her given circumstances, for want of a better phrase, as the framework for the play, in which everyone combusts and decomposes and hopefully emerges crisp and more phoenix-like. For me, in the end, the role is always secondary, whether it’s working on-stage or on-screen. It’s about the people you’re working with. I was drawn to the possibility of doing this in Sydney, and then ultimately [to] the opportunity of performing it [in New York], as a way of exposing the actors that we work with, the designers that we work with, the creative teams that we work with at the [Sydney Theatre Company] to an international audience.”



Blanchett and Upton ran the Sydney Theatre Company together for five years, staging acclaimed productions in Australia and then touring them around the world. It was a demanding job, one that Blanchett says she misses in some respects—but not in others. “We’re very private people. But [when you’re] running such a public organization, you need to weigh in to the national conversation. There’s a great responsibility as a cultural advocate that means that one has to be very public. And so I don’t miss that.”

Still, Blanchett seems to be enjoying her time treading the boards in New York again, making her Broadway debut after taking other shows to the Brooklyn Academy of Music and Lincoln Center. Blanchett is one of a small handful of movie stars who regularly does theater—Jake Gyllenhaal, currently starring in a swoon-worthy Sunday in the Park with George revival a few blocks north of Blanchett, is another one—but Blanchett doesn’t have any sort of ratio or equation in mind when accepting a film role versus a theater role. “There’s never really a plan,” she told us. “Except to do the work that I feel I can do. Sometimes it’s stuff where you can see an opportunity to do something, or to work with a director. Anthony Minghella on Talented Mr. Ripley. Lasse Hallström in The Shipping News. [Those roles] were very colorful characters, but I was working with two directors that I really wanted to work with, and on material that was the antithesis of the job that I’d just done. I could see an opportunity there. So often it’s been something that other people turned down!”

Are there any specific theater roles that Blanchett would carve out time for? “I wouldn’t mind a crack at Richard III,” Blanchett told us. (Someone please make this happen.) “But it depends on the director. There are plays that I would love to be part of realizing, but in the end, there’s no point playing Hamlet or Medea or Richard III or whatever the role is—or one yet to be written—unless you’re in something that is whole. Hamlet doesn’t make sense if Claudius and Gertrude aren’t present and completely enmeshed in the fabric of the piece, and therefore the production doesn’t work. I’m more interested in productions that have a chance to connect with the audience than how many lines I’ve got or how much stage time I have. I couldn’t be less interested. I don’t want to sound too pretentious about it, but I consider myself, no matter what the role is, an ensemble member.”

Blanchett will be an ensemble member in next year’s Ocean’s 8, a spin-off/continuation of the popular Ocean’s franchise, which she filmed on Mondays when not performing on-stage. But for now, there is just, quite fittingly, The Present, which runs on Broadway through March 19.

via Vanity Fair

Video Interview: Cate Blanchett Teases ‘Ocean’s Eight’ Surprises

Video Interview: Cate Blanchett Teases ‘Ocean’s Eight’ Surprises

Few days ago Cate Blanchett met with several magazines and media to promote the new Sì Rose Signature, this is the first video interview from that press day. Hear her talking about the new fragrance, the filming of Ocean’s Eight and her marriage. Enjoy!



“Extra” caught up with Cate Blanchett while she promoted the new Giorgio Armani Beauty Si Rose Signature fragrance in NYC, and the Oscar winner dished on her highly anticipated film “Ocean’s Eight.”

One of the guys from the “Ocean’s” franchise will be making a cameo the movie. Cate shared, “Matt [Damon]’s definitely coming back, and there are a couple of other surprises. I don’t want to give too much away.”

She will be joined in the film by other big names, including Sandra Bullock, Anne Hathaway, Rihanna and Mindy Kaling. The Aussie actress gushed, “Funny, funny, funny and generous women to work with. Finally get to work with Sandra Bullock, Sarah Paulson again, Helena Bonham Carter again, Anne Hathaway, which has been fantastic.”

via ExtraTV

The One Beauty Look That Cate Blanchett Wishes She Never Tried

Hey everyone!

New promotional interview with Cate for Sì Signature by Giorgio Armani. Enjoy!

Cate Blanchett has been topping our best-dressed lists for years—and quite frankly, it’d be a challenge to find a photo of the Oscar-winning actress where she doesn’t look downright gorgeous. But while it may be hard for us mere mortals to believe that the 47-year-old star—who’s currently starring in The Present on Broadway—could do any wrong in the beauty department, she insists that she’s had her fair share of missteps throughout her successful career. We caught up with Blanchett last week while celebrating the launch of Giorgio Armani’s new Si Rose Signature fragrance (she’s the face of the collection) and asked her to spill on her biggest beauty regrets to date. And much like her red carpet appearances, her answers didn’t disappoint.

“I don’t like an overly-plucked eyebrow, and I did that for a role once,” said Blanchett. “It was terrible, and it took forever to come back in.” While the thin eyebrow debacle may top her list of beauty blunders, it was only one of many times that Blanchett altered her appearance for a project and later faced the rather unpleasant reprecussions. “When I played Queen Elizabeth, I shaved my hairline—and that was a challenge when it grew back in,” she said of the dramatic look.

“For another role, I once shaved my whole head,” Blanchett continued. “I actually loved having my hair super short, but in the initial stages of growing it back in, I looked like a tennis ball. It’s the midway point that’s always really difficult—that’s when you have the regrets.”

Other than Blanchett’s past faux pas, we asked the star to spill on her current beauty faves, from her fragrance preferences to the skincare treatment that keeps her skin looking Broadway-ready every night. Scroll down for our full chat.

InStyle: When you’re choosing a scent to wear, what would you say immediately attracts you to the right one?
Cate Blanchett: For me, it’s always a very sensual and private connection. I think it bypasses your intellect and goes straight to your emotions, in a way. I’m always drawn to scents either that have a citrus note or have that base of a chypre in it, which Si obviously has, because I think they have a kind of mystery to them and that deep sensuality which I’m really attracted to.

The latest scent in the Si collection has strong notes of rose, which is where the fragrance gets its name. Are roses your favorite flower, personally?

Definitely one of them, for sure. Roses are so diverse—when you hear that a fragrance has rose in it, you think ‘Oh my goodness, it’s gonna be so sweet.’ But the surprising thing about this iteration of the Si family of fragrances is that one rose has a grassy note to it and the other has an almost spicy quality, and so it has a rose sort of aspect to the fragrance, but it’s not sweet. It’s deeper than that.

Do roses remind you of anything in particular?
Well, I always think of Alice in Wonderland. You know when you smell roses and they’re very powdery or they’re very grassy? Also I just love the texture of a rose. They’re so beautiful in all states: They’re beautiful when they’re buds, they’re beautiful as they’re opening, they’re beautiful as they’re at their perfection, at the high point of the flowering, and they’re even increcdibly beautiful as they decline. They’re just a beautiful flower to have either in a vase or in the garden.

What’s your general guideline for applying a fragrance—is there any such thing as too many spritzes?
I apply it constantly, and certainly at all the pulse points. I always keep a moisturizer in my bag and a bottle of fragrance, because you never know where you’re going to end up during the day. People often think wearing a fragrance is something you’re doing for other people, but it’s very personal to yourself. If it’s on the pulse points, then you can smell it, as well. It’s a very uplifting, mood enhancing thing to do.

So is it safe to say that it’s one of your favorite beauty rituals?
It’s interesting that people say it’s a “beauty ritual,” because I don’t see this as having to do with beauty. I think it has more to do with your emotional space—space that’s personal. I have very little time in my life, so any thing to do with beauty is very economical. I’ve been using the same skincare line for…god, probably going on sixteen years now. It’s kind of just like I don’t even have to think about it. And I don’t wear a lot of makeup day-to-day unless I’m onstage.

Which skincare product is your go-to?
I always have SK-II Facial Treatment Essence in my bag. You can spray it on during the day, and it’s unscented so it doesn’t obstruct anything you put on. Often, I find that skincare products are highly perfumed. I like something that does the job, but is more neutral than that.

You’re currently starring in The Present on Broadway. What has your approach been for the role, beauty-wise?
It’s a pretty natural look, but it could be a bit brutal onstage because you’re constantly taking makeup on and off. It’s really so important to cleanse your face properly, and I’ve been having a few oxygen facials.

via InStyle

Voice Enhancer – New promotional interview for Sì

Voice Enhancer – New promotional interview for Sì

Hello people! A new promotional interiew to promote The Present and Sì Rose Signature


Cate Blanchett can be forgiven for not knowing that Drew Barrymore wants to eat her.

The two-time Oscar winning actress is currently appearing on Broadway in an adaptation of Chekhov’s “The Present,” and her schedule is punishing. The actress has nine performances weekly, each clocking in at almost three hours, which doesn’t leave much time to catch E News, where Barrymore, promoting her new Netflix series about a suburban mom who becomes a cannibal, proclaimed Blanchett to be the person she’d most like to eat “because she’s like the most amazing woman ever.”

Blanchett laughs a deep throaty laugh when she hears the story, and immediately gives the love right back. “She’s an angel, a very talented angel.” But the actress — who today is conducting interviews with international beauty editors in her role as the face of Giorgio Armani’s Si fragrance before heading to the theater for her evening performance — has been avidly following the political news during her time in New York.

In January, for example, she joined the The Ghostlight Project’s protest march on Broadway, wearing a pink knit “pussy” hat, and while she couldn’t attend the Women’s March on Washington because of her performance schedule (“I was there in spirit,” she says), she hasn’t been reticent about speaking her mind.

“When Elizabeth Warren is told that she can not speak in the Senate, they are dark days,” says Blanchett. “I don’t know what century I’m in. I thought that the equal pay for equal work conversation was boring and reactionary enough, but this is deeply shocking. We have the choice now to evolve as a species and part of that is finally getting rid of the shocking inequalities that exist not only between the genders but the wealth divide.”

Blanchett’s relationship with Armani has been a longstanding one — she likes to tell the story of running out to buy an Armani suit after getting her first acting paycheck and is quick to note that she still owns it (“his clothes don’t date”) — due in part to his espousal of gender equality. “He was one of the first designers to really unlock the complexity of the female aesthetic. He liberated women from the need to wear traditionally feminine clothes or traditionally sexy clothes,” says Blanchett. “There is a kind of Eastern simplicity, and also an Eastern mélange of the opposites that exist in his designs — you’ve got the masculine with the feminine and the soft with the hard.

“He is interested in all of those dualities,” she continues, “and when he was creating Si he wanted all of those complexities and dualities to exist.” It is a message that has resonated. Industry sources estimate that Si, which is currently launching its second flanker called Rose Signature, has reached retail sales of $80 million in the U.S. since launching in 2014.

Sitting in the Presidential Suite on the 53rd floor of the Mandarin Oriental Hotel, Blanchett, wearing a navy Armani trouser suit, has a commanding view of New York City and Central Park. When asked if she’s enjoyed working in New York, she gives a brief hesitation. “It’s very confronting at the moment, for sure, but it’s a great city,” she says.

While she’s performed in New York before, “The Present” marks her Broadway debut. As for what’s next to tick off on the bucket list? Blanchett reels off a list of directors she’d like to work with, including Thomas Ostermeier, Julian Rosefeldt (who directed her in the one-woman multiscreen film installation, “Manifesto”) and Andrea Arnold. “And I’d also like to finally get some chickens in my chicken coop,” she adds. “So there is a lot to do.”

via WWD

Cate Blanchett on Her New Play and Performing Post-Election

Good morning to you all! Cate Blanchett promotes The Present with InStyle, during the launch of the new Sì Rose Signature. Enjoy!

With over 25 years of stage experience, Cate Blanchett is a veteran when it comes to the theater. But while the Oscar-winning Australian actress has performed in stage productions around the globe, her recent Broadway debut in The Present managed to keep her on her toes. Written by Blanchett’s husband, Andrew Upton, the limited-run play was initially performed in Sydney before it made the move to New York City in December—and for Blanchett, the new setting offered a completely fresh perspective on the project.

“It’s very interesting to perform the play for an American audience now, because everyone—no matter who you voted for—is in such a state of turmoil,” she told InStyle last week while celebrating the launch of Giorgio Armani’s new Si Rose Signature fragrance (she’s the face of the collection). “There are uncertain days; it’s very fragile. And the play deals a lot with the fragility and lack of time.” Blanchett’s character, Anna, is facing those topics head-on in The Present. The entire play focuses on the widowed Anna’s 40th birthday, which she’s celebrating with a group of friends at her Russian country house. With time to kill and plenty of booze to go around, things soon spiral out of control as Anna and co. reminisce about the past and revisit old relationships while trying to figure out their next steps in life.

Blanchett explains that she relates to her character’s fear of the unknown the most. “She’s very unresolved about her past and uncertain about her future,” said the 47-year-old star. “I probably share her uncertainty about the future, and I don’t think I’m alone there.” While Blanchett is similar to Anna on that front, she’s more interested in the ways that she’s unlike her stage persona. “I’m always looking for the points of difference, I think, between me and a character,” she said. “So it’s not necessarily that I share personality traits with her, but I definitely connect with her preoccupation with time being so precious and so important; spending time with people, and how little we do it. That’s probably where I connect with her most.”

Anna’s perspective on aging—and, specifically, turning 40—is wrought with mixed emotions, but for Blanchett, it’s simply a non-issue. “It’s funny, but I just didn’t have that same mentality [about turning 40],” she said. “I felt like I should, if only because everyone talks about it. I think men get talked about in a slightly different way—their age means something different. They’re somehow liberated when they’re in their forties, whereas women are meant to be sort of fixing themselves up and trying to stave off the inevitable.”

That wasn’t the case for Blanchett, who found herself unfazed upon hitting the big 4-0. “When I reached 40, I was actually sort of relieved and excited,” she said. “You approach it with such a sense of fear because it’s built up to such a degree, but it wasn’t as bad as I thought it would be. We’re so full of fear, but these situations are often the opposite of what we expect.”

While it might be tricky to predict how she’ll feel on special occasions, there’s one thing that Blanchett can expect: memorable gifts from her family. “During the first couple of years of our marriage, my husband gave me a vacuum cleaner and a blender on our anniversaries,” she said. “I think he was trying to give me a few hints about being a bit more active in our domestic life.” Other than appliances, the presents that really rate with Blanchett inherently pack a special meaning. “In the end, I love the things that people—especially my children—have made,” she said. “They make things out of matchsticks, and my middle child once made a clay skull that he had drawn a bit like the Day of the Dead. It’s the handmade things that I really love.”

And, unsurprisingly, it’s family time that ranks highest on her list of favorite activities. When she’s not busy performing, Blanchett relishes relaxing with her kids at home—in one spot, specifically. “I’m growing to love my bed more than any other item of furniture in the house,” she said. “The best thing is when all four of the kids and my husband and I are just sitting there. I think we probably have our best conversations as a family in our bed. Thank god it’s enormous.”

Of course, there are a few culturally-relevant books taking up space on her nightstand at the moment. “I’m reading Behold the Dreamers by Imbolo Mbue, which is about an immigrant family living in America,” said Blanchett. “And then the other book I have is Hillbilly Elegy by J.D. Vance, which is about the disconnect between the white working class and the sort of perceived privileged classes,” said Blanchett. “So it’s a book for both Democrats and Republicans. It’s about the state of the nation, really, and how America has got to where it is.” Topical, indeed.

Six Questions for Cate Blanchett

Six Questions for Cate Blanchett

Hello everyone! New interview with Cate for T Magazine/ The New York Times Style Magazine and a new image from the campaign’s set. Enjoy!

Cate Blanchett for Sì Rose Signature Limited Edition 2017

The title of “The Present,” now playing on Broadway, is a clever one. The play takes place at a summer house in Russia on the occasion of a 40th birthday, and there are a few physical gifts in play — notably, a chess set and an antique gun. (The play is a Chekhov adaptation, so yes, both get used before the final curtain falls.) But it’s also concerned with the specters raised by “the present” as a concept, particularly in a group of friends with years of history between them: How does the past of each relationship impact how we might feel about it now? How much can we ever depend on the future?

The linchpin of the proceedings is the birthday girl, Anna, played by Cate Blanchett with wit, grace and physical deftness. She spends much of the play’s first half smiling in amusement, resolutely unruffled by the impassioned meltdowns of those around her, and much of its second half shouting and seducing and dancing on tables. During a busy time for Blanchett — in addition to the three-hour run of the play each night, she’s also the face of Armani’s Sì fragrance, which launches a new iteration of its Rose Signature scent next month — she answered a few questions for T.

When watching “The Present,” we get the impression that all of these characters are entrenched in ways of relating to each other, which then transform or explode as the play goes on. How did that back story take shape for you?

I think you’re absolutely right. The characters all want things from each other that they can’t deliver on; they’re all in love with the wrong person at the wrong time. A 40th birthday with a lot of alcohol and unresolved lust and longing is a very combustible set of circumstances. It was really exciting to work with people that I’ve worked with for a long time on this, because in Chekhov, not a lot happens, but everything happens. It’s all about time spent with each other.

Continue reading the main story
You’ve spent a long time with Anna by now — you were playing her when you were interviewed for an August 2015 T cover story. Are you still discovering new things about her and about this story as you continue to play it?

When you work with really playful, inventive, intelligent actors who are very open, as I’m having the great good fortune to do right now, I think it constantly opens up; and if the work is rich and deep, it’s a joy to return to it. We first performed it about 18 months ago, and then we had a hiatus and people went off and did other things, and then we came back together. We sort of collided with the past experience, but took it somewhere — not different, but somewhere deeper.

I don’t know if you’ve ever had that experience of driving home, and the route is exactly the same, but you’re preoccupied with something different, so you forget how you got here. On a good night, that’s the experience you have in the theater. People are always saying, “Oh, my god, it must be so tiring to do the same thing every night.” It’s the same journey, but you arrive there slightly differently depending on what other people do.

And also, I must say, performing to an American audience right now in the wake of the inauguration of the current administration, there’s whole layers of meaning — of moral compromise and uncertainty of the future and what is right, what is wrong — that have always been in the play, but because the audience brings that to bear, it’s shifted the play slightly, which has been really interesting.

How, as an actress, have you seen that borne out when you’re playing the part? Is it just a feeling in the air, is it that laugh lines are slightly different…?

As an actor on stage, the audience often thinks that they’re there to be entertained, but they’re a vital, active component of the evening. It’s not about laughter, necessarily; it’s quality of listening. Broadway audiences are so literate: They love theater, they love being told stories, they love a surprise. And that, coupled with the current — it’s not even a political climate, it’s like a moral climate — has meant that the play’s been attended to in a slightly different way.

I think we’re all so hyperaware of our relationships to the truth right now, and to our sense of objectivity, in every interaction we have throughout a day.

Language is incredibly powerful: the words we choose to use, and how we choose to use them. I remember ages ago, the word “evil” was purloined, and it’s been very bewildering to me watching the word “refugee” morph into the word “immigrant” morph into the word “terrorist” within the space of nine months. “Truth” is an immutable word: Something is true or it is not. Theater, actually, its currency is language.

You mentioned the inherent drama of a 40th birthday party that collects people from different stages in someone’s life. Do you think there’s anything specific about that time of life that is more likely to give rise to dramatic situations?

It’s very built up, that moment in a person’s life, the 40th. And I think for her, it’s compounded with the need or desire to move on and to take stock of where she’s at; and take what is useful and valuable and worthwhile from the past, and jettison that which is not as she moves into the future. There’s certain points in one’s life where one takes stock, and I think in an archetypical way, turning 40 is often that moment, but for many people it’s not. For many people it’s their mid-40s or their 50s or their 60s. It depends on the degree of maturation, I think, and self-awareness that the person has.

You’ve been a brand ambassador for Armani for some time — what were your first impressions of the new Sì fragrance? Are there any memories or emotions it evokes for you?

I think there’s a definite optimism in calling a fragrance Sì at the moment, particularly a female scent. We have to be positive and forward-looking, and we have to say yes to those things we believe in and yes to ourselves. When Mr. Armani spoke to me about being the face of the fragrance, I had no idea there were going to be so many iterations. I love a fragrance that has those deeper woody notes that develop so beautifully — but this has got a double rose. Normally, I’m not a fan of rose, but because the rose is green, and there’s a Turkish rose in there, which has a hint of orange to it, it’s actually really beautiful. It’s humorous and optimistic, which I think is a good way to start the day.

This interview has been edited and condensed.

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via T Magazine

Video – Cate Blanchett at Live with Kelly

Video – Cate Blanchett at Live with Kelly

Good afternoon, yesterday Cate went to Live with Kelly to promote The Present. Video and screencaptures below, enjoy!

#CateBlanchett with Kelly and @busyphilipps! #LiveKelly

A post shared by LIVE with Kelly (@livekelly) on




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