Cate Blanchett on ABC 90 Celebrate
Posted on
Jun 16, 2022

Cate Blanchett on ABC 90 Celebrate

Good day, Blanchett fans!

Cate Blanchett is set to be featured in the live two-hour entertainment TV event, ABC 90 Celebrate! She has appeared in a few of ABC programmes: Police Rescue, G.P., Heartland, Rake, and most recently in #StatelessTV which she co-created and co-produced.

A first look footage for Guillermo Del Toro’s Pinocchio was shown at Annecy Film Festival and VR project, Evolver is still showing at Tribeca Film Festival. Read a review on Evolver from Independent below.

ABC 90 Celebrate!

ABC has announced a stellar lineup of famous faces set to feature in the live two-hour entertainment television event, ABC 90 Celebrate! Airing Thursday, 30 June at 8.00 pm on ABC TV and ABC iview.

Hosted by Zan Rowe, Tony Armstrong and Craig Reucassel, the broadcast will feature an exciting list of performers and presenters who are set to celebrate the value and role the ABC has held in connecting Australians for 90 years.

Throughout the evening, audiences can expect live crosses to different locations, studios and community events across the country.

Taking audiences through a nostalgic journey of the programmes and people that have made an impact across the 90 years will be an abundance of Australian entertainment legends.

The list includes Adam Liaw, Amy Shark, Annabel Crabb, Bjorn Ulaveus, Bryce Mills, Cate Blanchett, Christine Anu, Daniel Browning, Hunter Page-Lochard, Ebony Boadu, Kev Carmody, Leah Purcell, Leigh Sales, Magda Szubanski, Michael Hing, Molly Meldrum, Namilla Benson, Richard Roxburgh, Roy & HG, Ross Wilson, Steph Tisdell, Wil Anderson, and many more.

Pinocchio

Guillermo Del Toro world premiered eight minutes of footage, finished and unfinished, from his stop-motion fable about a wooden boy with a borrowed soul.

Even without the full title “Guillermo del Toro’s Pinocchio,” the film’s artistic voice would be unmistakable. In the first excerpt screened we find Geppetto encountering the newly living Pinocchio for the first time. The characters are unlike any versions we’ve seen prior. The inventor, for one, seems thoroughly soused (or at least terribly hung-over), picking himself off the floor and stumbling across his creaky workshop with bloodshot eyes.

Only something is stirring, something is upstairs, and that something announces itself with a fright. As the wooden puppet moves out of the shadows, it does so not with the upright footing of a boy but with the spindly movements of a bug. Newly brought to life, Pinocchio moves at first like a spider, using his arms as two extra legs before (presumably) learning that in order to be a real boy one should aim to be bipedal.

Cate Blanchett takes us inside the human body in an epic VR experience

Stepping through a blacked-out revolving door in Manhattan’s Financial District and into Evolver, a virtual reality exhibit about human breath, the audience is confronted by a dark concrete room. There’s an eerie, amplified natural soundscape of babbling brooks and passing storms and enormous backlit pictures that feel familiar, but with closer scrutiny prove ineffable. An indistinct image could be a Hubble telescope capture of the stars or maybe a tree’s underground roots, or even a network of human capillaries, magnified to a scale that renders the mundane fact of circulation alarming. This is, of course, the point.

Created by the London-based art collective Marshmallow Laser Feast, luxuriously narrated by Cate Blanchett, and co-executive produced by Terrence Malick, Evolver drops its audience inside the human body on the journey of an inhale. Here we follow the flow of oxygen from the outside world, through our lungs, and eventually to our distant cells. But the impression of the exhibit – which had its world premiere last week at the Tribeca Film Festival – is far less sterile than its brief. Though based on biologically accurate renderings, the result is closer to painterly mimesis than precise simulation. There’s no way the inside of my body looks this spectral and astonishing.

The exhibit acknowledges that’s a trippy question to ask, and so our first ten minutes are spent in deliciously enveloping zero gravity chair sacs, functioning like a palate cleanser. Instead of bulky VR headsets, attendees are outfitted with pillowy headphones and invited to close their eyes. Cate Blanchett then huskily murmurs in your ear about the relationship between your body and the world beyond it.

Transitions are always messy in big, interactive exhibits, but being roused from Cate Blanchett’s seductive whisper to be tightly fitted with futuristic goggles was particularly unwelcome but quickly forgotten. In the main presentation, Blanchett’s voice is replaced by a moody, natured-inflected soundtrack by Radiohead’s Jonny Greenwood, avant-garde artist Meredith Monk, late Icelandic composer Jo?hann Jo?hannsson and experimentalist Howard Skempton. It starts aloof and electronic and grows triumphantly grandiose. Visually, human breath streams and swirls around you like the Milky Way; blood vents as explosively as lava. The path of the molecules that appear to surround you can be modestly altered by swooping your hand across your body.

Virtual reality on this scale is disorienting; a watchful exhibition assistant had to save me from walking into a wall and later, another participant. It’s also stupefying – I struggled for words in the minutes immediately after and I’m told some visitors even cried. But Steel’s impossible question occasionally revisited me. Are you breathing the air, or is the wild world remaking itself in miniature inside you? Is circulation anything less beautiful than a brook that babbles within us?

Evolver won’t improve your anatomical understanding. Instead, it elevates the simple and involuntary fact of human respiration into something as extraordinary to look at as the world outside us. It accomplished something more startling than making me think about my own breath. It made me gasp.

Sources: MediaWeek; Variety; Independent

Disclaimer Update & Not Now, Not Ever Book
Posted on
Jun 14, 2022

Disclaimer Update & Not Now, Not Ever Book

Hi, everyone! It has been slow news day as we await for release of Cate’s projects this year and other news — according to Screen Daily the AppleTV+ series, Disclaimer, is still filming in London. On a more recent news, former Prime Minister (Australia) Julia Gillard is releasing a new book which would have a contribution from Cate and other feminist figures.

Disclaimer

Leslie Manville was recently announced as part of the cast of the 7-episode AppleTV+ series. Italian newspaper, il Fatto Quotidiano, is reporting that two episodes of the series will be filmed at Forte dei Marmi in Tuscany, Italy.

Here’s the list of characters the announced cast will be playing in the series:

Cate Blanchett – Catherine Ravenscroft; a successful and respected television documentary journalist whose work has been built on revealing the concealed transgressions of long-respected institutions.

Kevin Kline – Stephen Brigstocke; a widower who wrote an intriguing novel that was sent to Catherine Ravenscroft which reveals a story she had hoped was long buried in the past.

Sacha Baron Cohen – Robert Ravenscroft; Catherine’s husband who is a lawyer (role is not confirmed yet).

Kodi Smit-McPhee – Nicholas Ravenscroft; Catherine and Robert’s son (role is not confirmed yet).

Hoyeon Jung – Kim; Catherine’s assistant who is ambitious, hardworking and eager-to-please, she knows that working for Catherine is going to be her big break.

Louis Partridge – Jonathan Brigstocke; a teenager on his gap year traveling through Italy who allows himself to give in to his deeper desires with unexpected consequences.

Lesley Manville – Nancy Brigstocke, a woman devastated by her young son’s untimely death. Her life has been defined by her grief, and she lives a quiet life with her husband, Stephen.

Not Now, Not Ever Book

Julia Gillard has just announced her explosive new book Not Now, Not Ever set for release this year on 5 October 2022.

Ten years on from her famous Misogyny Speech, Gillard’s new book explores the history and culture of misogyny, while laying out a roadmap for the future. While the past ten years have undeniably seen many changes – and improvements – there is still a long way to go.

With contributions from several authors and experts, the book explores the reality of misogyny in 2022 and provides a look back at how the Misogyny Speech has inspired women since 2012.

With plenty to explore, the book is a well-rounded and highly-anticipated read for anyone hoping to understand the effects of misogyny on modern society. Kathy Lette looks into how the speech has resurfaced on TikTok, while Cate Blanchett, Brittany Higgins and more recall their first time hearing it. Next-generation feminists Sally Scales, Chanel Contos, and Caitlin Figuerado provide inspiring insight, and of course, the echoes of the rallying cry ring through each page: Not now, not ever!

Sources: ScreenDaily; il Fatto Quotidiano; Penguin Books; Variety

VR Project ‘Evolver’ narrated by Cate Blanchett
Posted on
Jun 9, 2022

VR Project ‘Evolver’ narrated by Cate Blanchett

Hi, everyone! The trailer for Evolver which is a “VR Journey of Life and Breath” has been released. The VR project is narrated by Cate Blanchett and is showing at Tribeca Film Festival. She is also an executive producer through Dirty Films.

Cate Blanchett (“Carol”) and Terrence Malick (“The Tree of Life”) have reteamed on “Evolver,” a VR free-roaming, music-filled interactive and transcendental experience which is world premiering at the Tribeca Film Festival.

Produced by the artist collective Marshmallow Laser Feast (“We Live in an Ocean of Air”) in the U.K., Atlas V (“Spheres”) in France and Pressman Film (“The Crow”) in the U.S., “Evolver” is a pioneering experience taking audiences inside the landscape of the body, following the flow of oxygen through a branching ecosystem, to a single ‘breathing’ cell. The experience has been conceived to be replicated and sized up in festivals and museums around the world and can host up to 100 people at the same.

Veteran producer Edward R. Pressman is executive producing with his long-time friend Malick as well as Blanchett, Coco Francini and Andrew Upton through their banner Dirty Films. Pressman and Malick’s first creative collaboration dates back to 1973 with Malick’s feature debut “Badlands.”

Blanchett, who previously worked with Malick on “Knight of Cups” and “Voyage of Time,” was approached by the filmmaker to join “Evolver” and has given it a greater spiritual depth. Blanchett narrates the experience, starting meditation phase during which she reads a poem created by Daisy Lafarge and guides audiences as they connect with their own bodies and the natural world through a cycle of respiration.

“Voicing Evolver was not so much building a character but creating an atmosphere or a state of mind,” Blanchett told Variety. “Working with Marshmallow Laser Feast, I responded not only to the arresting visuals but the resonant poetry of Daisy Lafarge’s text,” Blanchett added.

Blanchett said “Evolver” shares similar themes as “Voyage of Time” as it reflects on the meaning of life. “It’s been an extraordinary thing to be in Terry’s orbit. The thrum of his world view is intoxicating and any chance to be in a dialogue with him I leap towards with open arms,” said Blanchett about reuniting with Malick. “Giving voice to ‘Voyage of Time’ was an eye-opening meditation and Evolver is a wonderful extension of that conversation,” said the Oscar-winning actor.

While Blanchett has voiced several animated features in the past, this marked her first time narrating a VR experiment.

“VR is obviously a much more immersive experience than conventional animation, which the Evolver team has harnessed to a spectacular degree.”

Blanchett described “Evolver” as an “immersive experience on a metaphysical level that” and said she thinks it will “take the participants on a dynamic journey as the work is simultaneously inward and outward facing, encouraging deep introspection and reflection but also inviting people to connect, not only to their own bodies but to the natural world around them.”

Source: Variety

 

 

 

Dirty Films with Origma 45 to produce Noora Niasari’s ‘Shayda’
Posted on
May 22, 2022

Dirty Films with Origma 45 to produce Noora Niasari’s ‘Shayda’

Happy Sunday, everyone!

Dirty Films is going to be producing another movie which is the directorial debut Iranian/Australian writer and director Noora Niasari. It will be led by Iranian actress Zar Amir-Ebrahimi.

Being sold in Cannes by HanWay Films, Niasari’s directorial debut follows a young Iranian mother who finds refuge in an Australian women’s shelter with her six-year-old daughter.

Iranian actress Zar Amir-Ebrahimi (Tehran Taboo, Morgen sind wir frei) is set to star in Shayda, the directorial debut of Iranian/Australian writer/director Noora Niasari. HanWay Films has come on board to handle international sales and distribution, while UTA Independent Film Group is representing the U.S. sale.

Shayda follows a young Iranian mother (Amir-Ebrahimi) and her six-year-old daughter who find refuge in an Australian women’s shelter during the two weeks of Iranian New Year (Nowrooz), which is celebrated as a time of renewal and re-birth. Aided by the strong community of women at the refuge, they seek their freedom in this new world of possibilities, only to find themselves facing the violence they tried so hard to escape.

Shayda is produced by Vincent Sheehan (The Hunter, Jasper Jones, Animal Kingdom, Lore) through his new production venture Origma 45. Cate Blanchett, Andrew Upton and Coco Francini at Dirty Films (Apples, Carol, Little Fish) are executive producers.

“We first encountered Noora’s talent watching her short films, The Phoenix and Tâm. We were blown away by her precise, emotionally-driven filmmaking and her capacity to draw out gripping performances,” said Dirty Films in a statement. “We are excited to be working alongside Vincent again to help Noora fulfil her bold and distinct vision for Shayda.”

Melbourne-based Niasari is well known for her award-winning short films including Waterfall which screened at the 66th Melbourne International Film Festival (MIFF) where it was nominated for best short film, Tâm and feature documentary Casa Antúnez.

Heads of production on the film will include cinematographer and Niasari’s closest collaborator, Sherwin Akbarzadeh (Stories From Oz). Osamah Sami (Ali’s Wedding), Leah Purcell (The Drover’s Wife: The Legend of Molly Johnson), Mojean Aria (The Enforcer), Jillian Nguyen (Expired) and Rina Mousavi (Alexander) will star alongside Amir-Ebrahimi. Production will commence on July 11 in Australia.

“We are delighted to be part of an incredible team supporting Noora Niasari’s feature debut,” said HanWay Films managing director Gabrielle Stewart. “Noora has written a beautiful piece that reflects much of her own experience of moving to Australia as a child. There is an intimacy to her storytelling that brings to life what it is to honor the traditions of the culture you have left behind as a mother raising her young child, whilst together bravely embracing a whole new one.”

Source: THR

Cate Blanchett greets ABC Australia on their anniversary; & boards VR project Evolver
Posted on
May 21, 2022

Cate Blanchett greets ABC Australia on their anniversary; & boards VR project Evolver

Hi, everyone!

Cate has sent a video message greeting ABC Australia on their 90 years. She has also signed on as executive producer, with her co-exec producers at Dirty Films – Andrew Upton and Coco Francini, for Evolver which will also be narrated by her and set to premiere at Tribeca Film Festival in June 2022.

Thank you to Erzsébet for the donation to the site.

Cate Blanchett boards Tribeca-bound VR project ‘Evolver’ as narrator and executive producer

Cate Blanchett is narrating virtual-reality project Evolver and has signed on as an executive producer alongside Terrence Malick and Edward R. Pressman.

Billed as a free-roaming, immersive journey through the breathing body, Evolver is world premiering in competition at the Tribeca Immersive programme at the 2022 Tribeca Festival where it will be presented at 120 Broadway from June 9-19.

The VR experience drops audiences inside the human body, following the flow of oxygen from first intake of breath.

Dirty Films’ Cate Blanchett, Coco Francini and Andrew Upton have boarded Evolver as executive producers. Fellow executive producers Edward R. Pressman and Terrence Malick first collaborated on the independent classic Badlands nearly 50 years ago.

Click the image for more information on the screening time

Sources: Screendaily; Tribeca

Cate Blanchett talks about addressing the climate crisis in a new podcast
Posted on
Apr 17, 2022

Cate Blanchett talks about addressing the climate crisis in a new podcast

Happy Sunday, everyone!

There is a new interview from The Observer with Cate and Danny Kennedy for their Audible original podcast, Climate of Change. Check out the magazine scan and you can read a part of it below.

Cate Blanchett talks about addressing the climate crisis in a new podcast

Cate Blanchett is Australian. I mention this fact because I’d forgotten it, somehow, so her manner of speaking — upbeat, front-footed, Aussie-accented — comes as a surprise. And I’ve spent quite some time hearing her talk over the past couple of days, as she has a new podcast, Climate of Change, which she hosts with her friend Danny Kennedy, another Australian. Kennedy is a CEO of an environmental non-profit, New Energy Nexus, and runs the California Clean Energy Fund. Their podcast, as you may have guessed from the title, is about the climate emergency. But before you come over all world-weary and what’s-the-point, before you get tetchy about preachy celebrities telling us stuff we already know, you might as well stop. Blanchett is already there.

“You can recycle up the wazoo, Miranda,” she says (told you she was Australian), “but it can just make you feel more cross and isolated and panicky… I get that. What we’re trying to do with the podcast is to turn the magnet towards optimism in these incredibly pessimistic times.:

We’re talking via video link, but Blanchett has her camera turned off. Kennedy, who’s in his office in Oakland, California, hasn’t and he wanders around, showing us the view from the window (just some more offices really). Blanchett’s location is a secret, due to heavy-handed PRs and her natural privacy, though I’d guess she’s in the UK (she lives in Sussex).

The location doesn’t really matter, of course, as they’re talking about a worldwide problem. The climate crisis is very real — we need to halve the world’s carbon emissions by 2030 —and becoming ever more so for those living in Europe, with our reliance on Russian gas. If you think about it all too hard, you can panic.

And Blanchett does, she says. In the first episode, she chats into the mic as she drives her electric car towards London and discusses how overwhelmed she can feel by the “tide of bad news”. She describes herself as a “mother of four” (the oldest is 20, the youngest seven) and an “optimistic pessimist”, and confesses to range anxiety as she forgot to plug in her car to charge last night. Her role in the show is to represent the listener, which is weird as she’s globally famous. But Blanchett’s approach is relatable: she wonders aloud if making an effort is worth it. Why bother recycling, up the wazoo or no, if the tipping point to the end of the worlds is so close and the people in power are still locked into fossil fuels?

She and Kennedy made Climate of Change earlier this year, mostly in a studio in east London. They have some strong guests: Adam McKay, the director of Don’t Look Up, makes an appearance, as does Prince William, to talk about his Earthshot prize. (He explains it very well, actually; it sounds much more interesting than I’d realized.) Still, at the start of the series, in common with many climate emergency podcasts, the discussion can feel rather broad, with smudgy chat about tech and innovation and the “disruptive decade”. At one point, someone says” “We are the stories we tell ourselves,” which might be true but doesn’t help that much with the gas bill. By episode two, however, the show is focusing on real-life solutions and these are undoubtedly encouraging. We meet a Filipino woman who’s designed a clean energy lamp that local fishermen can use; and the Londoner who’s brought gardening to train station. One California company, OhmConnect, has such a good idea about reducing at-home electricity that I try to sign up. But it’s not yet available in the UK.

What they’re trying to do with the podcast, say Kennedy, is to appeal to people like me. To show us tired recyclers that the answers to environmental catastrophe are already out there. “The choir has heard the doom and gloom song for a long time,” he says, “and sung it from the song sheet, like a good choir would. What they haven’t been taught is the song about solutions and the fact we’ve got them.”

“A lot of people are feeling fatigued,” says Blanchett. “I think we need a sense of, ‘No don’t worry, these changes are happening.’ Because they are.”

Blanchett and Kennedy met in Sydney in the early 1990s. They were part of the same social circle – Kennedy wrote a play with Andrew Upton, now Blanchett’s husband. Later, in 2008, Blanchett and Upton were appointed co-artistic directors of Sydney Theatre Company and decided to try to make the building, an old timber-and-glass warehouse, as ecologically sound as possible. They enlisted Kennedy to help. He brought in consultants – “one guy called Gavin Gilchrist: Cate, if you recall, the fellow who did the toilet flushes” – and helped redo the insulation to make the building “tighter and better, even though it was a pretty old, leaky, wooden construction”.

The biggest proposal was the installation of solar energy panels, which proved difficult to get past heritage rules and the general cynicism of Sydney’s county council. “We were met by a lot of internal skepticism and external opposition,” remembers Blanchett. “You know: ‘What has this to do with a cultural institution, what does it have to do with making theatre, why are we bothering?’ So we thought: ‘OK, we’ll be at the theatre company for 10 years and we have a whole suite of ambitions. And the solar panels will probably be the last one we achieve, if we do.’ And it was the first one we achieved.”

It took two years. There are now 1,906 solar panels powering lights, ventilation and air con across the building. Kennedy thinks that Blanchett and Upton’s theatre project was “a catalystic moment” that kickstarted a sense in Australia that solar power was viable and cost-effective; the country is now, he says, the biggest solar market in the developed world. Blanchett thinks of it as a “symbolic gesture” that, when added to an industry shift, “all adds up”.

So she and Kennedy have known each other for ages (Blanchett recently found some old photos of his daughters when they were little) and then, last summer, Kennedy came to stay with Blanchett and her family in Cornwall. They took him to the Eden Project, which he loved, and the podcast project was started there. They visited “these old mines that are engaged in modern, clean-energy transition minerals and materials production – I’m a geek, I love that,” he says. For Blanchett, the show was “a much more primal urge. We sort of had to. I had so many questions.”

I ask her about using celebrity to get attention on important issues. “Look,” she says, “if you have your two minutes in the sun, you can highlight solar technology or you can highlight an underwear line. But I’m genuine when I say that there were a lot of questions, embarrassingly ignorant questions, that I’ve been asking Danny over the decades. And I thought, ‘Well, I can’t be alone.’ When you ask a question, however ignorant or ill-informed it may be, you’re asking to open a door to a deeper understanding.”

Climate of Change podcast is out now on Audible.

The rest of the interview is on the magazine scan.

The New Review – April 17th 2022

Climate of Change Interview and Promos
Posted on
Apr 15, 2022

Climate of Change Interview and Promos

Hello, everyone!

You can now watch the interview with Imogen Heap, who is a guest on episode 6 of Climate of Change podcast. The podcast is now available on Audible. Check out two promotional videos below.

Promotional Videos

 

Cate Blanchett on Climate of Change Podcast
Posted on
Apr 14, 2022

Cate Blanchett on Climate of Change Podcast

Good day, everyone!

The Climate of Change with Cate Blanchett and Danny Kennedy, which was co-created, co-produced, and co-hosted by Cate, is now available on Audible UK. An outtake from the podcast interview with Prince William was also released. Check them below.

Click image for higher resolution

The six-part series, Climate of Change with Cate Blanchett and Danny Kennedy, will see the Oscar winner explore eco-anxiety and optimism with environmental activist Kennedy, as the pair raise awareness of the emerging technological revolution with the help of some special guests.

“Throughout the series, Cate and Danny speak directly to visionaries and trendsetters who are making innovative strides to turn the tide on climate change, from the Navajo Nation in Arizona to the Australian Outback,” Audible teases.

The guests on the podcast ranges from different backgrounds: former President of Ireland Mary Robinson, social historian Rutger Bregman, Prince William, 2021 Earthshot Finalists and Winners, economic thought leader and author Tony Seba and Agamemnon Otero, Katy Milkman, author and inventor Saul Griffith, director Adam McKay (Don’t Look Up), artist Luke Jerram (Gaia), fashion activist Livia Firth and musician Imogen Heap.

Click the image to be redirected to Audible UK where you can listen to clips or full episodes.

Climate of Change

Climate of Change Promotional

Promotional Screencaptures

Source: Radio Times, Audible UK

Stateless wins at Screen Producers Australia Award; & New Magazine Scan
Posted on
Mar 30, 2022

Stateless wins at Screen Producers Australia Award; & New Magazine Scan

Hi, everyone!

Slow news day on Cate but Stateless won at this year’s (SPA) Screen Producers Australia’s Award. Stateless is based on the idea by Cate, she is a co-creator and co-executive producer on the series. The series is available to stream on Netflix (outside Australia). There’s also a new magazine scan from Palace Scope.

Screen Producers Australia Awards 2022 Winners

“Every year, the SPA Awards are an acknowledgement of Australian screen industry excellence, uplifting diverse, locally-made productions with cultural impact and worldwide reach. Alongside the Queensland Government as Principal Partners, Screen Queensland is proud to have brought Screen Forever back to the Gold Coast — a globally renowned screen industry hub and a dazzling setting for tonight’s celebrations,” said Screen Queensland CEO Kylie Munnich.

“SPA members continuously raise the global bar for creativity and skillful producing, and tonight that talent was on full show. The task at hand is storytelling, and the winners of our 2022 Awards take this task seriously. They understand the significance of their work and the contribution it makes to the Australian economy, generating jobs for local creatives, and showcasing Australia and its unique heritage to millions around the world,” said SPA CEO Matthew Deaner.

Telemovie or Mini-Series Production of the Year (Tie)
• A Sunburnt Christmas – Every Cloud Productions
• Alice-Miranda Friends Forever – SLR Productions
• Hungry Ghosts – Matchbox Pictures
• Operation Buffalo – Porchlight Films
Stateless – Matchbox Pictures
• The Gloaming – The Two Jons
• The Secrets She Keeps – Lingo Pictures
• The Unusual Suspects – Aquarius Films

Palace Scope – March 23rd 2022

Source: TVTonight

Cate Blanchett UNHCR video and Apples conversation clip
Posted on
Mar 23, 2022

Cate Blanchett UNHCR video and Apples conversation clip

Hello, blanchetters!

A new UNHCR video has been released for Women’s History Month. Meanwhile, Apples which was directed by Christos Nikou and executive produced by Cate was released in Japan on March 11th with new conversation clip released. Watch them below.

Apples

CATE BLANCHETT Watching “Apples” reminded me of Alfonso Cuarón’s words, “A good director has a solid sense of the” pause “in the movie.” There was a solid “pause” in this movie as well, and I felt that the story unfolded naturally as I got into the experience of memory loss. It was very complete and captivated. I couldn’t believe this was the first feature film. I wanted to meet the director, so I met Christos. I hit it off right away. My wish is to help bring this “Apples” to people.

I was overwhelmed by the acting of the main character, the man. I heard he is a former dancer. That’s why he can manipulate his own body at will. You can tell a lot with a little gesture. I think it has the same kind of lightness as Jacques Tati. It has a strong presence in satirical comedy. But his acting has a lot of weight, and it makes the unreal world convincing. Absurd scenes make me feel very painful. You can be light while having grace and solemnity. I realized that it wasn’t black humor, but humor driven by melancholy.

This work is not only about acting style, but also about directing and the atmosphere of the whole movie. Visually very impressive, clear and unique. Christos is an extraordinary film director. He throws away all the molds and makes a movie. He wants you to see “Apples” on a big screen.

Source: Bitters-Apples