SK II #ChangeDestiny limited edition reveal in NY – Additional photos + interviews

Tuesday, Oct 17, 2017

Last week, Cate attended a press event to launch the new graffiti designed bottles (#YourStatementYourBottle) for SK-II Facial Treatment Essence in New York. Here are more photos and promotional content. Enjoy!



Cate Blanchett Explains the Mystery of How She Seems to Be Aging In Reverse

Cate Blanchett looks better than ever, that’s the bottom line. So when I saw the SK-II Global Brand Ambassador at the launch of the prestige skincare brand’s new Change Destiny Limited Edition series last week in NYC, I decided enough was enough—I had to get answers, because unlike many other people in Hollywood, this Australian darling is definitely aging in reverse. Below, Blanchett and I chat about her skincare secrets, the biggest beauty mistake she is guilty of making, and when she feels sexiest.

So you’ve been the face of SK-II for quite a long time. Why is this partnership such a great fit?

CB: Fifteen years! I tried it, and I was really blown away by just the shift in texture and tone, the brightness of my skin. So I did a little bit more investigating. It was so unusual. A lot of people had serums and liquid moisturizers, but at that time there wasn’t anything like it. So I thought I’ll just stick with this for a while, and I just didn’t look back. What’s fantastic about SK-II Essence is it feels like it penetrates immediately, and you can put it on makeup, put it on under makeup. Your skin is the largest organ in your body, and we put so much garbage on it, and we don’t wash it off properly, and then we wonder why it’s clogged.

What else do you do for glowing skin?

CB: The thing I’ve really started to do is to take vitamins—I’ve noticed a huge change. My nails will never grow, and I’ve been taking these vitamins now for about six months—huge difference.

When do you feel sexiest?

CB: [Laughs]. When do I feel sexiest? When I’m the least self-conscious, I think. It’s often to do with laughter, ‘cause it’s so liberating to have a good laugh—we all lead such stressful lives, and so if you can just release and have a good ol’ gas, I think people … yeah.

What really makes you laugh?

CB: Um. Unfortunately, fart jokes. The humor had to be pretty low. Kristen Wiig makes me laugh. She makes me laugh. And my God, she’s such a great all-around actress. But it’s also—I’m really pathetic—cat memes. Just really stupid shit like that. I was on Ellen, and she had all these things of cats in trucks and—

And that sends you over the edge?

CB: Yeah, children and animals invariably make me laugh.

Your skincare routine right before you go to bed—take me through it. Do you ever go to bed with makeup on, accidentally?

CB: Of course! I did the other night after the premiere. I was so tired, I went, ‘oh, I’ll lie down for five minutes,’ and then you realize it’s six in the morning and you haven’t done it of course. As long as you then pick it up in the morning. In a way, the most steadfast routine that I don’t ever give up is the morning routine. It just becomes second nature to me, like brushing my teeth—which I also do. Very important. Personal hygiene. I have three boys, and it’s really hard to instill personal hygiene in boys.

Why is it so hard with boys? I don’t understand.

CB: Oh my God! It’s like it’s some genetic dysfunction. It’s like just put the fucking toilet seat down! I was thinking ‘where is this coming from,’ and then the other day I was in the bathroom and I said to my husband, “It’s YOU!” and I realized, yeah, it’s by example.

So back to your skincare routine before bed….

CB: Oh yes. So then if I have gone to sleep with my makeup on, I make sure I tone it really well in the morning. But it really is The Essence and the LXP serum and the LXP moisturizer. We live in such artificial environments, and as much as I try not to, the pollutants in the city are so bad. What I love about the moisturizer is that it’s really hydrating. You can put your makeup over it and it’s not shiny. You feel it penetrates immediately. You don’t feel like it cakes onto your skin.

What’s the weirdest thing you’ve ever done on an airplane beauty-wise?

CB: Oh God… I wear the [SK-II] masks. I’m a long haul flight unfortunately a bit more than I’d care for, so I will put two or three on. Like one dries out and you put the next one on. Or I’d put one on, and two hours later put another one on. And I just talk to everyone with them on. I don’t know if that’s weird, but I just, I don’t care. I have no shame. They’ll come around to take your food order, and I’ve just got this mask on [laughs].

What’s one piece of advice you’d give your younger self?

CB: There was a nanosecond where—being Australian, once again—where I thought this summer I’m going to have a tan come hell or high water, and I was on the roof, as white as I am, covered in baby oil. And also, it’s so hard as a teenager, and even into your 20s, your sense of yourself, I mean it always evolves, but you’re so vulnerable to other people’s interpretations and impressions of what you should look like. And I’d say ‘fuck that’ a bit more. And that’s where women can step in and really champion different types of beauty and working what you’ve got. Everyone’s starting to look the same and talk the same, it’s only interesting when we’re all—it’s the melting pot, right? I’d worry about it less. And since discovering this I’ve really worried about it less. Because I just thought ‘I’m set, I’m done, I don’t have to think about that.’ There’s a lot of self-hatred in women. I think I’d eradicate that in myself earlier.

If you’re going through a phase—especially since you travel so much—that you’re feeling rundown, not quite feeling energized and well, what are some things that you do?

CB: I do, sporadically, but I’ve decided I’m going to make myself do it every morning … Apple cider vinegar. A teaspoon of that. It just makes you feel clean—it’s good for your gut. And I have one child that’s had a lot of gut issues, so it’s been a decade of education for me. It’s been kind of a long journey, but it just makes me feel healthier from the inside. You do get used to it. It’s just to make your system more Alkaline. Stress makes it so acidic. Stress ain’t good for nothing. So you’ve got to find those little moments where you can literally just stop and take a breath. Spray some Essence on!

via In Style

Why Cate Blanchett Wants You to Stop Apologizing

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In any case of abuse, silence is not golden—nor is it worth a golden statue named Oscar. Cate Blanchett, who took home an Oscar for Best Supporting Actress in The Aviator (a Weinstein film), released a statement to Variety that pledged her allegiance to victims of sexual assault. A few days later at an event celebrating the release of three limited-edition bottles of SK-II Facial Treatment Essence (on shelves at Sephora and Sephora.com October 20) emblazoned with compelling mantras of their own like “Be the person you decide to be,” “Change is in all of us,” and “Destiny is a matter of choice,” the award-winning actress stressed the importance of speaking up, standing together, and overcoming obstacles (whether they be as small as combatting wrinkles or as grandiose as tackling misogyny in the workplace) by joining forces. “It’s so important at this moment in time. When misogyny is now, more than ever, on the rise, that women support and back one another,” Blanchett exclusively told Fashion Unfiltered. “This is not political. We have to put our foot down and make the change. Like you say, it’s 2017, no more apologizing.”

I’m sorry is a phrase uttered by women far too frequently (which for any naysayers out there, is a scientifically proven fact). Instead of wasting our breath on apologies, Blanchett suggests we band together and let out a resounding roar that can’t be ignored. “Talk to other women about it. I think the more honest we are about those problems that we have or the challenges we’re facing, we can positively move forward together,” she said. “I don’t know about you, but I found the Women’s March so utterly inspiring because it was non-political. It was women saying: We have to change the paradigm, we have to change the language around this, and we cannot wait for anyone else to do it, we have to do it ourselves. The more women talk about that stuff and share the challenges of being a woman in the 21st century, and the pressures that we place upon ourselves and are placed upon us by the media, the more we can feel better ourselves.”
And the pressure to stay young and beautiful, but also not showcase our sexuality too overtly for fear that this display could be misinterpreted by others as “asking for it” (at least according to Donna Karan), is certainly a 21st century conundrum. “It takes great courage, particularly in the age of trolling, for women to claim the space to be authentically who they are physically, spiritually, and mentally,” said Blanchett. “In 2017, I find it utterly bewildering that we are still having the conversation about what women should wear, how women should be behave, and what rights women should have. Why are we still being [forced] to defend ourselves?” It’s a good question—one that perhaps we are getting closer to answering as social media movements swirl into a collective storm of empowerment. Instead of saying I’m sorry or labeling another woman a “party girl” who deserved sexual harassment because she was “bad,” as noted by Wood on Twitter, perhaps we could adopt two words that Blanchett has stood by during her career instead. “I have always had a clear bottom line: self-respect,” she explained. “The challenges facing the women working in the film and television industry are the same across all industries.” Regardless of gender, we need to have enough self-respect to blow the whistle loud and proud whether we are a victim, a witness, or merely an advocate for eliminating the “casting couches” that continue to plague generations of women from every walk of life. As the SK-II bottle says, “Change is in all of us.”

via Fashion Unfiltered