Posted on
Oct 3, 2022

60th New York Film Festival Press Conference

Hi, everyone!

We are just less than an hour for the NYFF premiere of TÁR. Earlier Cate with Todd Field, Nina Hoss, Sophie Kauer, and Hildur Gudnadottir attended the press conference which was moderated by Dennis Lim.

TÁR Promo
Posted on
Sep 30, 2022

TÁR Promo

And so we begin TÁR US promo. An interview with Cate will air on CBS’s Sunday Morning. She will also appear on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert on October 6th. Twitter Movies is also collecting questions about TÁR to be answered by Cate and Todd Field. You can reply on the tweet link below if you have questions. You can also check a TV spot that aired on CBS today below.

CBS Sunday Morning

The program will air on October 2nd, 9AM ET.

Cate Blanchett on transforming herself in the drama “Tár”
Two-time Academy Award-winner Cate Blanchett talks with correspondent Seth Doane about her latest film, “Tár,” and her performance as an orchestra conductor facing multiple crises which has earned Blanchett critical acclaim. She also discusses her discomfort with the spotlight, and how self-doubt drives her to keep working.

Source: CBS
TÁR Official Trailer and Empire Magazine Scan
Posted on
Sep 29, 2022

TÁR Official Trailer and Empire Magazine Scan

Hello, everyone!

A full trailer for TÁR has been released and we also have scans from Empire Magazine where Cate had a short interview. We are a few days away from the New York premiere of the movie, on October 3rd there is a Q&A with Cate, Todd Field, Nina Hoss, Sophie Kauer, Mark Strong, and Hildur Guðnadóttir then on October 4th, Cate, Nina, and Todd will introduce the movie to the audience.

TÁR Trailer

TÁR Official Trailer Screencaps

Empire UK

Empire UK November 2022 issue is out now and can be ordered here.

Here is a part of the article:

The film is a psychological drama from Todd Field, who had almost worked with Blanchett on a 2012 political thriller that didn’t get off the ground. “As soon as I knew Todd was sending me a script, I instinctually knew I was going to do it,” Blanchett tells Empire. “Then I read it and it was absolutely mindblowing, because I didn’t know what it was. That for me is the most exciting and dangerous way to start a project.”

The initial idea for TÁR, which deals with the corruption and fragility of power, the paranoia that comes with being the best and the complex world of gender politics, came to Field during the pandemic. “I’d been thinking about this character for a while; someone who has done everything they could to climb out of [a difficult upbringing] and attain their dreams.” he explains.

The shoot was intense with Blanchett learning to conduct for the role. “When you’re a singer, you have one melody to sing. When you’re a conductor, you have eight to ten coming out of your fingers,” she says.

Cate Blanchett at Milan Fashion Week
Posted on
Sep 25, 2022

Cate Blanchett at Milan Fashion Week

Happy Sunday, everyone!

Cate Blanchett attended Giorgio Armani’s Spring/Summer 2023 collection show at this year’s Milan Fashion Week. We will be adding more photos, for the meantime check out these photos and video below.

 

UK/Australia Season Ambassador Cate Blanchett message ahead of Edinburgh Festivals
Posted on
Aug 5, 2022

UK/Australia Season Ambassador Cate Blanchett message ahead of Edinburgh Festivals

Happy Friday, everyone!

UK/Australia Season Ambassador Cate Blanchett sends message ahead of Edinburgh International Festival and Edinburgh Festival Fringe. Cate was named ambassador last year. Watch the video below.

The UK/Australia Season is a major new cultural exchange between Australia and the United Kingdom (UK) celebrating the diverse and innovative artist communities and cultural sectors of each nation. The Season is a joint initiative by the British Council and the Australian Government’s Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade.

The artistic programme ranges across theatre, film, visual arts, dance, design, creative technology, architecture, music, literature, museums, broadcast, public engagement, and features numerous exciting cross-arts commissions. There will be a number of world, UK and Australian premieres. The nationwide programme will span city, regional and rural areas across Australia and the UK.

Source: UK/AU Season

 

 

 

Hosting Renewal Donation Drive
Posted on
Jul 19, 2022

Hosting Renewal Donation Drive

Hello, everyone!

As you know, we to need renew hosting and domain annually. The deadline for hosting renewal is 1 month from now and so far we’ve gathered about US$ 76 (without discounting the PayPal fees).

You can check below the previous mass updates that we have done over the years. We really need your help to keep the site alive and if we can’t make the deadline, we’ll have to close the site for good.

We understand times are tough, but that’s the only way to keep the site online. You can use the buttons below or the ones in the sidebar. Any help is appreciated.

 






Or using QR Code:

You can click each images to view previous mass updates:

April 2017 update

August 2017 update

September 2017 update

December 2017 update

May 2018 update

August 2018 update

December 2018 update

May 2019 update

May 2020 update

May 2021 update

May 2022 update

Disclaimer Set Photos & Glastonbury 2022
Posted on
Jul 16, 2022

Disclaimer Set Photos & Glastonbury 2022

Happy weekend, everyone!

We have our first look at Cate Blanchett as Catherine Ravenscroft in the upcoming Apple TV+ limited series Disclaimer which is directed by Alfonso Cuarón. They were filming at Portobello Road in Notting Hill, London on Friday.

Last month, Cate attended Glastonbury Festival. She was seen watching the set of HAIM with her husband Andrew Upton. She also watched the set of Sir Paul McCartney and was interviewed by BBC. You can watch the interview below.

On set of Alfonso Cuarón’s Disclaimer

Filming of Disclaimer at Notting Hill

Glastonbury 2022

 

 

Cate Blanchett at LVMH Prize 2022
Posted on
Jun 2, 2022

Cate Blanchett at LVMH Prize 2022

Happy Friday, Blanchett fans!

Yesterday, Cate had a short trip to Paris where she was made ambassador at this year’s LVMH Prize. She presented the Young Fashion Designer Award to Steven Stokey Daley. Check out the photos, videos, and articles below!

Thank you to Frauke and Bronte for their donation to the site!

LVMH PRIZE 2022

By my watch it was 2:49 pm at the Louis Vuitton Fondation in Paris when Cate Blanchett delivered the news: “I know I speak for everyone in wishing the winner a long and fulfilling career. So, the 2022 LVMH Prize for Young Fashion Designer goes to… SS Daley!” The audience whooped as Steven Stokey Daley, 25, stepped up onto the stage in his voluminous khaki collection trench coat to accept the fancy golden award. As with everything else over the last 48 hours spent here prepping for this moment—sleep-time excepted—Daley delivered his speech with aplomb. “This is like an Oscar, so thanks Cate! I genuinely didn’t expect to win, so thanks to everyone who supported me.”

Shortly after she handed Daley that fancy award, Cate Blanchett said: “I wasn’t part of the judging process, I just joined at the last minute. Which is interesting because you can make decisions based on your own personal taste. But it’s an entirely different process when you understand as a juror you have someone’s career and development at stake… Because everyone can have an amazing moment and there are so many breakouts, but can they sustain the brutality of the fashion industry?”

Left to Right: Jonathan Anderson, Nicolas Ghesquière, Sidney Toledano, Maria Grazia Chiuri, Cate Blanchett, Bernard Arnault, Silvia Venturini Fendi, Delphine Arnault, Stella McCartney, Jean-Paul Claverie, Kim Jones, and Nigo

Delphine Arnault announces: “I am very happy that Steven Stokey Daley, has won the LVMH 2022 Prize for his brand S.S. Daley.  He appropriates the codes of tailoring by playing with the clichés of upper-class English culture. This year, the jury has decided to award the Karl Lagerfeld Prize to the designer Eli Russell Linnetz for his brand ERL who draws from the culture of Venice Beach and his native California, to create joyful, cool and sensual clothes, and to Idris Balogun for Winnie New York, who revamps the codes of a colourful elegance, inspired by the staples of menswear.

I would like to congratulate all the finalists and I applaud their outstanding talent and creativity. I am also very grateful to Cate Blanchett and Eileen Gu for being here today, both of whom are outstanding in their own fields and an inspiration to us all. Finally, I would like to thank the members of the exceptional Jury for their involvement in this edition and for their support to young creation.”

Sources: Vogue; LVMH

Happy Birthday, Cate Blanchett! – Mass Update 2022
Posted on
May 14, 2022

Happy Birthday, Cate Blanchett! – Mass Update 2022

Today is the day! HAPPY BIRTHDAY, CATE BLANCHETT! We wish that she have a healthy life and continuous success in her career.

In our own little way of celebrating Cate’s birthday, it has been a tradition of the Cate Blanchett Fan team to have a mass gallery update. Such updates aims to make as many photos as possible available to everyone. We have updated some low quality to middle/high quality photos and uploaded additional photos from events, movies, photoshoots, magazine scans.

This fansite is run for free by Cate fans but every year we also have to renew the host in order to keep the site open. This costs US$300 and the deadline is in August this year. We hope that you can support the site by donating — any amount is deeply appreciated. You can click on the donate button below or on the left side bar (when viewed on desktop).

Enjoy the update!

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Greg Williams has shared the colored version of some photos taking during 2022 Screen Actors Guild Awards. Nicola Clarke, who is Cate’s hair stylist and friend also shared a video with some never before seen photos towards the end of the video.

 

 

Cate Blanchett and Cindy Sherman on New York Times
Posted on
May 4, 2022

Cate Blanchett and Cindy Sherman on New York Times

Ciao, everyone!

Last week Cate went to an exhibition by Cindy Sherman while she was in New York and NYT has released an article about the visit.

On the 45th anniversary of Sherman’s acclaimed series “Untitled Film Stills,” they toured her show, discussing what an image, or a smile, may reveal.

Cindy Sherman and Cate Blanchett had only met in passing, a few times. And yet there is an identifiable thread connecting the work of Sherman, the artist who (dis)appears, disguised in character, in her own photographs, and Blanchett, the protean and Oscar-winning Australian actress. On a gray morning in late April, the women, mutual admirers, convened at Hauser & Wirth gallery on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, where a collection of Sherman’s critically acclaimed early work opened May 4, and where they quickly forged a connection.

“I’m a massive fan,” said Blanchett, proving her adulation with detailed questions, both technical (does Sherman use a timer?) and philosophical (“where does rhythm sit in photography?”). Blanchett had whisked into town to receive an award from Film at Lincoln Center, before heading back to London, where she is filming “Disclaimer,” an Apple TV+ series directed by Alfonso Cuarón.

Sherman was busy overseeing the exhibition, which includes all 70 of her untitled film stills, the black-and-white photos that put her on the map, and shook up the art world, starting in the late ’70s, as well as her subsequent rear screen projection and centerfold images, all in color and all starring her. Sherman, 68, and Blanchett, who turns 53 this month, toured the exhibition together, eagerly finding commonalities.

“She really takes on different personas,” Sherman said admiringly.

In 2015, Blanchett performed in “Manifesto,” a 13-channel video art installation by the German artist Julian Rosefeldt, in which she played at least a dozen different characters, from news anchor to homeless man, reciting various artistic and political manifestoes. (It was later released as a feature film.) “That was inspiring,” Sherman said, adding that she felt like she’d done some of those characters too. “It was a nice confirmation, of feeling like we’re on the same wavelength a little bit.”

In what was less a conversation than a cosmic matchup, they talked about getting into character, childhood play, the value of makeup, and the horror of clowns. These are edited excerpts.

How do you make use of each others’ work?

CATE BLANCHETT Filmmaking can be very literal. So, I find anything you can do to move yourself to a more abstract space. Sometimes it’s a piece of music. But invariably it’s an object. Oftentimes, I’ll make a whole tear sheet composition about the feeling around something I can’t articulate, images that had nothing to do on a conscious level with what I’m doing. Like the Clown series, for instance. I can’t even begin to express my revulsion and terror — the visceral feeling of seeing those works [Sherman’s series of lurid clowns]. I tore it out for [the Guillermo del Toro film] “Nightmare Alley” recently.

I find if you slam something left of field up against what you need to do as an actor, it can create something slightly more ambiguous. It doesn’t always work.

CINDY SHERMAN I don’t really get into the characters that way, but there’s a big difference between what I’m doing and acting. I’m just standing still, and because I’m also working alone, I can really mix it up, do the complete opposite of what I thought the character should do — and sometimes that works.

Did either of you grow up thinking that you had very malleable faces?

SHERMAN I didn’t.

BLANCHETT No. I used to do this thing with my sister where she would dress me up, stand me in front of the mirror and give me a name. Then I’d have to figure out that person. My favorite one — we kept saying we were going to make a movie about him — his name was Piggy Trucker. He was a little short guy, a bit like an Australian Wally Shawn [the actor and playwright Wallace Shawn], and he drove a pig truck. [I was] probably about 7, 8 years old.

SHERMAN It was playing dress-up. My mother would go to the local thrift store and for 10 cents buy these old prom dresses from the ’40s or ’50s. There was also, I think it was my great-grandmother’s clothes that were left in the basement. I discovered them, and it was like, wow. It looked like old lady clothes, but also the pinafore type of things. When I was 10 or 12, I would put them on, stuff socks to hang down to the waist to look like old lady [breasts], and walk around the block.

BLANCHETT [laughing, pretending to be Sherman] I knew then I wanted to be an artist!

Often, these things start as play and then the exploration becomes, I imagine, a seamless transition. It’s not conscious — some of these things, you’re doing without thinking.

SHERMAN Yeah. When I was in college, I was putting makeup on and transforming myself in my bedroom when I was studying painting. I think I was working out my frustration with whatever was going on in my life, and my boyfriend at the time finally just said, you know, maybe this is what you should be taking pictures of. And that seemed like a good idea.

Sometimes, I’ll be making up [a character] and look in the mirror as I pose, and I suddenly feel like I don’t recognize [myself]. Wow, where did she come from? It’s kind of spooky, kind of cool. [To Blanchett] How do you come up with characters? Like all those for Julian [Rosefeldt]?

BLANCHETT It was so fast. It was quite interesting for me actually, because you can get really hung up on your character’s back story, particularly in American acting culture. It’s all about your connection — if your mother died or father died, then use that. That is really alien to me anyway. I’ll talk to my therapist about that. What was really great about the Julian thing was, there was no psychology. It was just a series of actions. Most of the time, we’re not thinking about what makes us tick. You’re doing things. [To Sherman] You’ve done a few male incarnations too.

SHERMAN That was a lot harder. I had to just become confident in a way that I, as a woman, maybe am not. Once I relaxed into the character, I [sometimes] felt, this is a very sensitive guy.

Sometimes, I’ll be making up [a character] and look in the mirror as I pose, and I suddenly feel like I don’t recognize [myself]. Wow, where did she come from? It’s kind of spooky, kind of cool. [To Blanchett] How do you come up with characters? Like all those for Julian [Rosefeldt]?

BLANCHETT It was so fast. It was quite interesting for me actually, because you can get really hung up on your character’s back story, particularly in American acting culture. It’s all about your connection — if your mother died or father died, then use that. That is really alien to me anyway. I’ll talk to my therapist about that. What was really great about the Julian thing was, there was no psychology. It was just a series of actions. Most of the time, we’re not thinking about what makes us tick. You’re doing things. [To Sherman] You’ve done a few male incarnations too.


Click images for higher resolution

SHERMAN That was a lot harder. I had to just become confident in a way that I, as a woman, maybe am not. Once I relaxed into the character, I [sometimes] felt, this is a very sensitive guy.

BLANCHETT Often a smile is a defense. It’s actually a shut down rather than an invitation. When you smile with your eyes, that’s where the genuine thing comes from. One of the many things that’s so powerful about your work is creating that expectation [of emotion] but not delivering, so there’s an eerie sort of hollowness to it. It’s the disconnect from what we present to who we actually are, and that vacuum between the two. It’s often the space where all our personal horror sits.

[To Cindy]It’s interesting, you go through this process by yourself. I’m not a great fan of the monologue. I did a play once, a Botho Strauss play, where I had a monologue for 25 minutes. It was like, wow, this is lonely. Often on films, there’s zero rehearsal or even conversation about stuff. You’re just meant to walk on and deliver. You’re thinking about the result, and I find that a pretty deathly way to work.

I’ve realized over the years that my relationship with the costume designer and the hair and makeup people is really profound. It’s profound to see what the character looks like, and therefore how a character might move or project. Those departments — so-called “female guilds” — are often things that male directors profess to know nothing about. “I’ll just leave that bit to you.”

I played Elizabeth I years ago and the director, whom l love and respect, was always, I just want the hair down, flowing in the wind. I said, have you seen the pictures of Elizabeth I? There weren’t that many like that.

But it’s because [some male directors] need to feel attracted. They can’t see that there are other ways — and not even in a sexual way — you can be alluring. You can draw an audience into a character’s experience in many different ways. I keep going back to the clown images — you can tell I’m really disturbed by them. When you’re taking them, do you think: I want people to feel repulsed by this?

SHERMAN Even the repulsive things I’ve done — grotesque things with rotten food — I want people to feel kind of repulsed, but attracted and laughing at it, all at once. I don’t want people to take it too seriously.

I’ve always been attracted to horror movies, and I equate that to the feeling of being on a roller coaster. You know you’re not going to fall out, but you can still be terrified. And then it’s all over. I think that’s how fairy tales functioned way back when. I was trying to do that with my work, to make it seem from a distance like, oh, pretty colors! And up close — oh, it’s a little awful. But then you get the joke.

In the mid-80s, this company in Paris asked me if I would make some ads for French Vogue. That’s when I started playing with fake blood and fake noses. They hated it, of course. That inspired me to make it much more dark. I got fake scar tissue and fake body parts. Eventually I found these prosthetics — fake [breasts and butts] was the perfect way to start playing with nudity, partly because I think I’ve been hiding in the work. The idea of revealing any part of myself literally was never the point.

BLANCHETT I’m quite kinesthetic — that’s why I love being onstage, I feel like I’m always better in movement. You’re so incredible, there’s so much movement, and then, it’s all captured in this vibrating, still image.

It’s like when you go and see dance. It’s that moment of [sharp inhale] suspension before someone lands that’s so thrilling. Andso great that [your photographs] are not titled. You’re not led to make any particular sense of them. These works, it’s like a litmus test. Thank you.

Source: New York Times