Category: General

First look at “Sweet Tooth”, Australian fairy tale film narrated by Cate Blanchett

First look at “Sweet Tooth”, Australian fairy tale film narrated by Cate Blanchett

Hey everyone!

New project with Cate!

Cate Blanchett is the narrator of new Australian fairy tale short film called Sweet Tooth. The 22 minutes movie, set in a fictional European town in 1780, is inspired by the classic narrative of Hansel and Gretel but focusing on the untold of the wicked witch and her gingerbread house.
Sweet Tooth is directed by Shannon Ashlyn and it is also a project proudly committed to pushing for change both in front of and behind the camera in terms of gender parity in the film industry.

No release date is available at the moment. However, stay tuned!

Synopsis

Once upon a time, there were a brother and a sister called Hansel and Gretel. The children stumbled through the dark woods, lost and afraid, until they came upon a marvelous house of sugar and spice and everything nice. That is the fairy tale we know. But there are always two sides to every story.
Many moons earlier, a little girl is born to a penniless baker’s maid – a baby blinded by the Red Devil’s disease. Together with her little brother, she must navigate a cold world and stand up to the hardened townsfolk who dislike them. But, as time passes, the children have fewer and fewer places left to hide and must seek refuge in the forest. Out there, it will be up to them to find a home where no one will ever find them. Until, one day, there would come a brother and a sister: Hansel and Gretel.

On Cate Blanchett being part of the project:

Cate Blanchett supports emerging female filmmakers

Albert Einstein once said, ‘If you want your children to be intelligent, read them fairytales. If you want them to be more intelligent, read them more fairytales!’ And who better to tell you a tale of dark forests and magic beyond your wildest dreams than the inimitable Cate Blanchett?
[…]

Blanchett has unquestionably given wings to these filmmakers as they step out onto the international stage with their first film. By endorsing this story, the Australian icon has not only elevated the film in a way they hardly dared imagine until it actually happened, but she has also made a clear statement about supporting emerging female talent going forth and claiming executive roles in filmmaking, the roles which are traditionally (and therefore disproportionately) filled by men.
The week the filmmakers approached Blanchett, Dr. Blasey Ford was standing trial in the Kavanaugh hearings in the US. It never felt more timely to be courageous and to go out on a limb for the sake of women everywhere. Witch hunts are far from being a thing of the past.
To Ashlyn and Shearer, the fact that Blanchett agreed to lend her voice and profile to Sweet Tooth is proof that when women unite, anything is possible, and that magic doesn’t just happen in fairy tales.

***

How did you convince Cate Blanchett to join the Sweet Tooth team?

Shannon Ashlyn: The answer is very simple: we just asked her – from the heart and with zero expectations. Mad as it sounds, we never imagined anyone else narrating, so when it finally came to it, I plucked up the courage to record a piece to camera explaining why I had written the film and why I believed its message might be something Cate may also deem important. Admittedly, it felt surreal…!
Katherine Shearer: That was the first, crucial step. But after that, it still took a lot of faith and support from the people around us to get our message to Cate. For instance, our casting agent and mentors at AFTRS really put themselves out there for us, even as first-time filmmakers. That was incredibly humbling, and we are so thankful. The fact that Cate actually agreed was – and is – a dream come true.


Teaser – Trailer

Poster

Official Website
Official Instagram
Official Facebook
IMDB
Source

Cate Blanchett for Beauty Papers magazine VII Glamour issue

Cate Blanchett for Beauty Papers magazine VII Glamour issue

Hey Blanchetters!!

Time for a new interview with Cate Blanchett! She is in the cover of Beauty Papers magazine VII Glamour issue released today. Cate Blanchett stars as American artists Bruce Nauman and Andy Warhol in a short video and photoshoot for the magazine.
If you can, make sure you buy a copy!

Performance: Cate Blanchett

[…] Undeniably beautiful, yet she is too intelligent, too complex and too layered to be shoved into an easy package. It is this complexity that makes her arguably the best of her generation. She leapt to international fame with regal period excess in Elizabeth, progressed through waspish 1950s bourgeois in The Talented Mr Ripley and excelled with ethereal elvish mystery in The Lord of the Rings. She has worked with directors such as Todd Haynes, Sally Potter, Jim Jarmusch and Martin Scorsese on comedies, dramas, thrillers and period pieces. She is an Australian who can seem faultlessly Scottish, Russian, American or British. Blanchett has won Oscars for Blue Jasmine and The Aviator, been nominated for four others, and notched up three Golden Globes. She is at the top of her game, yet not afraid to be experimental, as her collaboration with artist Julian Rosefeldt in 2015 demonstrated. Away from the stage and the screen, she is also a UNHCR Global Goodwill Ambassador, working on human rights projects.

Many of her roles have played with or unpicked the image of beauty. The mature lesbian chic of Carol, the disintegrating edges of Jasmine in Blue Jasmine or the confused attraction of Sheba in Notes on a Scandal all highlight the fact that there is something beyond perfect hair, clothes and sex appeal. Blanchett truthfully comes across as a woman of substance.

Francesca Gavin: Your career grew out of theatre and you worked with the Sydney Theatre Company for a long period, more recently working on Broadway and in London. Are you still attracted to working on the stage? Which aspects of your stage experiences do you think have had the most influence on your approach to acting and creating?

Cate Blanchett: Now that is a question and a half… My time as co-artistic director of the Sydney Theatre Company was probably the most formative regenerative period of my career thus far. A homecoming of sorts – to the rich and hungry artistic community from which I sprang. But apart from the enormous responsibility for the fiscal and creative health of the company and indeed fostering the careers of emerging and mid-career artists, Andrew [Upton, husband] and I were placed into a dynamic national creative conversation. This was so very galvanising. For better or worse, one still has to fight in Australia for the basic notion that the arts should be available and central to people’s lives. But perhaps this is rapidly becoming a global issue. Wasn’t it Winston Churchill who refused to cut arts funding during the war as an austerity measure saying, ‘Then what are we fighting for?’ In spite of all the talent my country possesses, there is still a profound lack of confidence in our artistic output. That was in large part why we made it our mission to tour the company’s work internationally.

FG: How do you approach finding such a breadth of roles? Variety feels something central to your choices.

CB: Oh yes, variety is very much the spice of my life… but I’m beginning to think about repetition much more. When I say that, I mean in order to go more deeply into things – not always looking for the next and the new. Perhaps part of why I’m an actor is that I’m far more interested in the thoughts, feelings and experiences of others than of my own – mine are a tad boring. I’m sure there are a myriad of people who would back me up there! But to try to answer your question… my choices have always been made on instinct. And, since having children, around school holidays.

FG: What do you find interesting about the process of transformation – visually, but also internally and psychologically – when you become different characters?

CB: All I ever see is myself. Which bores me rigid. Transformation is not a focus for me. The story is – do I want to be part of this conversation? Do I have anything to offer it? But in terms of character – which is always the point of entry for me in a project – I am very text-based. The rhythm of good writing. The tempo of a character as well as what they choose not to say. Often, what someone says is a smokescreen to what they actually think or feel. Who does a character think they are as opposed to who they actually might be.

FG: What are your feelings about the pressures that Hollywood presents to women in terms of their looks?

CB: Oh, those boring pressures are age-old and eternal. Men feel them too, I’m sure, but the reaction to this manifests itself in different ways. But I feel there is a healthy interest in people’s points of difference, their uniqueness, which means performers are stepping into a space of boldly finding their own non-cookie-cutter way of doing ‘their thang’. Women, in particular, are collectively now prizing their worth and their individuality. I think that extends to challenging the male gaze which has run mainstream cinema for so long. Nothing wrong with a male gaze – it’s just mind-numbingly boring and exclusive if other perspectives are suffocated.

FG: Some of the characters you have played on screen – for example, Jasmine in Blue Jasmine – are very conscious of their perceived image. What have you found interesting about that sense of self-preoccupation?

CB: I’m always saying yes, perhaps to my own detriment. I just get excited by fabulous ideas – and the prospect of nutting out a world and sets of experiences or theories I have no present knowledge of. The only hard part about that for me is the doing of it. I’m a little on the shy side. Kaboom! Not all actors are exhibitionists.

FG: What is your definition of glamour?

CB: Glamour shines, it’s effortless and unselfconscious and damn sexy. It’s also quite unattainable. Something to reach for. It probably also involves brushing one’s hair?

FG: You have played some incredibly strong, powerful proto-feminist women, from Elizabeth to Katharine Hepburn. What do you like about these individuals who are either in positions of power or innately powerful? To what extent do you feel that is a reflection of yourself?

CB: If there is any similarity between characters I’ve played on film and myself it’s utterly unintentional. But when you say powerful, what do you mean exactly? That these women have a strong impact on the narrative? They know and speak their minds? Because a woman in a position of power is not an interesting enough byline for a film in and of itself. Often in the past, producers have been fascinated by certain so-called powerful women in history, women who have made an impact on events, on the world around them, broken new ground, women who are complicated and conflicted. But then haven’t bothered to find a reason to make a film about them. Having had the imagination to locate them in a riveting story that is more than their character alone. The story is the thing. The perspective. Interesting ‘powerful’ male characters have more often than not been encased in a great ripping story.

FG: What are your feelings about the representation and limitations of gender?

CB: I’ve been reading Maggie Nelson lately, who is fascinating and revelatory on the subject of gender binary thinking. She talks about gender as not being volunteerism, about it not being performative. She referenced Judith Butler about dealing with the question of how do we rework the trap we are all inevitably in. I’m fascinated right now with how one turns the inclusive nature of feminism, female equality, from downfall to unassailable strength. How one claims it without allowing it to be weaponised…It’s why I wanted to be in Martin Crimp’s play with Katie Mitchell [When We Have Sufficiently Tortured Each Other]. To investigate all this ‘stuff’.

FG: What are your feelings about make-up and costume? Do you find them inspiring elements in your process of creation?

CB: I adore make-up and costume. The most delicate and robust creative time on any project happens in wardrobe fitting and in the make-up business. And so very many of those elastic tossing-ideas-around and trying-things-out sessions have been with Morag [Ross]. Her eye and her sense of risk are very, very inspiring.

FG: Your job is to constantly embody other people. How do you maintain your sense of self?

CB: My sense of self, if I have one, is non-linear and utterly elastic. And honestly, apart from owning my fuck-ups and missteps, of which there are many, I try to think about myself as little as possible. There is just too much else to be concerned about in the world right now. The void under the Thwaites Glacier? The Dakota Pipeline, anyone? Australia’s offshore detention horrors…?

Source


Cate Blanchett to be a guest on #BooksToLiveBy – a BBC Sounds podcast

Cate Blanchett to be a guest on #BooksToLiveBy – a BBC Sounds podcast

Hey Blanchetters!

Cate Blanchett is among the guests from a new BBC Sounds podcast called Books To Live By hosted by Mariella Frostrup.
See the info below and stay tuned!!!

Listen to the podcast HERE

Thanks to CBF Chat members for sharing this info with us!!

Cate Blanchett for Giorgio Armani Beauty and Sì Fiori

Cate Blanchett for Giorgio Armani Beauty and Sì Fiori

Hello everyone!

It’s time for an update!
New event and content featuring Giorgio Armani Global beauty Ambassador and face of perfume Sì, Cate Blanchett.
Let’s start with this beautiful photo Armani Beauty on instagram released a couple of days ago.



Source: https://www.instagram.com/p/BuzGpHgh0Sv/

Last Tuesday, Cate celebrated the launch of Sì Eau de Parfum Fiori in London at The Connaught where she also had a press day to promote the new fragrance. And she is blond again!

Do you remember Cate’s interviews with blogger Gogoboi from China? See them here. He’s back with a fun new article.
During her last visit to Shanghai, Cate spoke to him about Sì Passione and other beauty products from Giorgio Armani. Hopefully a full video from this interview will be released in the future.





Read full article ib Chinese here :https://mp.weixin.qq.com/s/L2x5K8yuUO5WUUbIv_YYag

There is also a small article from Elle Czech

CATE BLANCHETT BÁSNÍ O NOVÉM PARFÉMU OD ARMANIHO

Armani Sì je na sv?t? a s ním i jedine?ný film.
Sebev?domá. Krásná. Dokonalá. Nejnov?jší kampa? zna?ky Armani Beauty je p?esn? taková. Stejn? jako oscarová here?ka Cate Blanchett, která je její hlavní hv?zdou. V krátkém rozhovoru popsala ELLE, jak se jí nový parfém Armani Sì líbí a co ji ?eká v blízké budoucnosti.

Jak vnímáte ženu, která zt?les?uje v?ni Armani Sì?

Je to žena, kterou sama chci být. Dobrodružná, plná emocí, otev?ená všem p?íležitostem, sv?dná a spokojená sama se sebou.

Spolu s novým reklamním spotem vznikl i film Fleur Fortuné. Jaký je rozdíl mezi hraním v reklam? a ve filmu?

Osobn? nemám ráda ozna?ení „tvá? parfému“. Svoji roli vnímám víc spirituáln?… Spíš n?co jako duch v?n?. A proto jsem m?la radost, že ho m?žeme vyjád?it práv? pomocí filmu, který je daleko mén? statický než klasický reklamní spot. Ve filmu jsou emoce, radost, obavy, vzrušení, riziko, lehkost… A láska!

Co vás napadlo, když jste v?ni ucítila poprvé?

Domov. Vždycky byl vo?avý, vždy? to byl d?m plný žen. Levandule, frézie, v?n? d?eva, mo?e… Vzpomínám si, že moje babi?ka stále von?la po fialkách a maminka zase po citrusech.

Co se vám na v?ni nejvíce líbí?

Jak se umí nádhern? rozvon?t. Miluji v?n?, které voní podle vaší osobnosti!

Krom? toho, že jste si zahrála v Armaniho filmu, co dalšího ješt? chystáte?

„Aktuáln? m? m?žete vid?t Národním divadle v Londýn? v p?edstavení When We Have Sufficiently Tortured Each Other režisérky Katie Mitchell. Jedná se o dílo v?nované genderové politice – jde v n?m o v??ný boj o intimitu a rovnost. Není to každého šálek ?aje, ale je to jist? provokativní p?edstavení.

Existuje n?jaká postava, kterou byste si ráda zahrála, ale zatím vám ji nikdo nenabídl?

Mám ráda p?ekvapení. Vždy mi jde o to spolupracovat s kvalitním týmem. Ale když nad tím p?emýšlím, tak by m? asi bavilo zahrát si n?jakou postavu, kterou bych nejmén? o?ekávala.

Source

New HQS




Updates | Documentary Now! episode “Waiting for the Artist” featuring Cate Blanchett

Updates | Documentary Now! episode “Waiting for the Artist” featuring Cate Blanchett

Hello everyone!

Have you watched Documentary Now! episode “Waiting for the Artist”?
We have and we think Cate is amazing as perfomance artist Izabella Barta! The episode is hilarious and memorable!
If you haven’t watched it yet, make sure you do!
Here are our updates on this awesome project. Enjoy!


‘Documentary Now!’: The Incredible Cate Blanchett Episode That Had to Be Made in Four Days

There are few TV shows with as much obsessive attention to detail as “Documentary Now!” That’s probably why it came as no surprise to series co-creators Alex Buono and Rhys Thomas that one shot of Cate Blanchett riding a mini tricycle in a massive Hungarian courtyard ended up taking a big chunk of an entire day.

“There was one moment in it where she’s riding on a tricycle in the square. And that’s on screen for like five seconds. And that probably cost us about five hours to get that shot. When you’re shooting for four days total, that was an expensive shot to get. But it’s worth it because they’re just going to take place as her somewhere,” Buono told IndieWire.

It’s the kind of creative choice that “Documentary Now!” has the freedom to make, given its bizarre mission statement. Over 17 episodes to date, the IFC series has taken some of the most venerated and iconic documentary films and flipped them on their head. But in the process of crafting these comedic versions, they still have to follow some of the same filmmaking tenets that govern the works they’re parodying.

Read More:‘Documentary Now!’ Trailer: That’s Not Actually Marina Abramovic, That’s Cate Blanchett
“You’re making a documentary. So the ability even just to put it up for a few frames, it has an immense value to opening up the scale,” Thomas said. “Sometimes the crew’s like, ‘Do you really need that thing?’ I feel like we always push to do more of that.”

The series, now in its third season, has tackled plenty of the biggest documentary titles of recent years. The show’s most recent episodes have tackled parody versions of “Wild Wild Country” and the classic D.A. Pennebaker look behind the recording of the Broadway cast album for the Steven Sondheim musical “Company.”

This week’s episode has a slightly more narrow focus — the 2012 Matthew Akers film “Marina Abramovi?: The Artist Is Present” — but it enlisted the services of Blanchett, arguably the show’s most famous guest cast member to date. Luckily for the show, she came in with the same level of preparation that goes into making these episodes feel so close to the spirits of their predecessors. Playing this exaggerated version of notorious performance artist Abramovi? (the “Documentary Now!” version is named Izabella Barta), Blanchett plunged into all the wild riffs that the script called for.

“The way she threw herself into it was unforeseen. We knew she’d be good, but you don’t know until they walk up on set whether that they understanding the tone and the level of commitment, you know?” Thomas said. “But once she was on board, she was doing all this research. She had teeth made to shift her jawline. She had 15 wigs or something that she worked on with her longtime hair or makeup people. Her commitment to the detais matched our detail-oriented thinking.”

Filming all of Blanchett’s scenes in such a short time period meant not just making sure that all the logistical details were in place before production, but that the team could construct an entire fictional life’s worth of archival and artistic material in a single day.

“We basically created the body of work of her entire career. We had one day to do that because we needed to get all that footage and put together to projections and photos and stuff for the actual exhibit that we did at the end. We prepped like nuts. We were in Budapest about two weeks before we did it. Just seven days of 20-something-hour days, really trying to get it dialed in.”

One setpiece in particular gave the team an unexpected hurdle. One of the fake performance art pieces called for a prop toilet stall. In venue after venue, from the lodgings that inspired “The Grand Budapest Hotel” to one of the city’s famous train stations, the people in charge of the venues repeatedly balked at having something bathroom-related in a public space.

“Cate Blanchett is going to be in lingerie and she’s going to be lapping up milk and there’s going to be a cat there. She’s going to be tied to a wall,” Buono said, describing the pitch at various locations. “Then we said, ‘OK, we’re going to put a toilet stall right here.’ The Hungarians were just like, ‘Wait a minute, what do you mean a toilet stall? This is offensive that you would even suggest that.’ They wouldn’t budge.”

Eventually, they obtained clearance to film the scene in the Budapest Opera House. But that necessity of being flexible in the face of absurdity is a reflection of the same things the show asks of its performers, too.

“You’re moving so fast that unlike other shows, you don’t have trailers. Because the talent is never gonna go back to the trailers. It’s just, ‘No, no, no, stay with us. You’re gonna be shooting again in five minutes’” Buono said.

It all goes back to the insane weekly time crunch of another show that gave so many of the creative team their start.

“So many of us that make the show came from ‘Saturday Night Live’ and had been there for a very long time. I think a lot of our crew would rather not be that way, but we all respond really well to quick [turnarounds],” Buono said.

“It’s kind of exciting,” Thomas added. “That’s always the challenge of, ‘Well, how are we going to do it?’”

Source

‘We Hope She Likes It’: Fred Armisen Explains How He and Cate Blanchett Parodied Marina Abramovic and Ulay

This week, the world was finally treated to “Waiting for the Artist,” a pitch-perfect parody of the 2012 documentary Marina Abramovic: The Artist Is Present.

The mockumentary, which is part of the third season of Documentary Now!, stars two-time Academy Award winner Cate Blanchett as Izabella Barta (a thinly veiled Abramovic) and Fred Armisen as Dimo (a fictionalized Ulay, the artist who collaborated with Abramovic in in the 1970s and ’80s).

Throughout the episode, we follow Barta as she struggles to come up with a new work for an upcoming show in Budapest. “The question on everyone’s mind that they’re not saying is, ‘does she have anything new to say?’” Dimo tells the filmmaker. “I think maybe not; her best work is in the past.”

The show is full of small delights for art-world insiders. There’s a Klaus Biesenbach-type curator, an appearance by the real-life Mr. Brainwash, and even a sequence in which Blanchett (as Barta) trains young performance artists, which is presumably inspired by Abramovic’s plans to open the Marina Abramovic Institute for the Preservation of Performance Art.

There is also a clever bit of gender politics. In the show, Barta labors to advance her career, while Dimo, a lazy unoriginal, and conceited artist, finds success easily. “I put no thought and no time into it,” he says at one point about one of his exhibitions. “Opening night, I went to the store and bought a bunch of crap,” including a fork and a toothbrush that he displays to acclaim.

Barta, on the other hand, is best known for her piece Bucket Series, in which the audience is invited to litter the gallery floor with all sorts of objects before the artist rushes in with bucket over her head, racing to answer a phone ringing in the center of the room.

In an interview with artnet News, Armisen was quick to clarify that he has nothing against Ulay. “In any narrative piece, you need a sort of villain, for lack of a better word,” he says. The choice to make Dimo lazy was plot driven, providing a foil to Barta’s unfailing dedication to her work.

One commentator in the show sums up their relationship thusly: “you had a woman who risked everything for her art, and a man who risked nothing.” (In real life, Abramovic and Ulay have had their ups and downs, but have set aside their differences in recent years, even making plans to write a joint memoir.)

We talked with Armisen about the episode, the challenges of parodying art, and waiting in line at art museums. This conversation has been edited and condensed for clarity.

What was it like filming this episode with Cate Blanchett?
We shot it in Budapest, and there was a video art piece at the museum with Cate Blanchett in it. A total, total coincidence! [Julian Rosefeldt’s Manifesto, in which Blanchett plays 13 different roles, was at the National Gallery from May 30–August 12, 2018.]

Amazing! That’s a great piece. And it really shows what a chameleon Cate is.
We weren’t prepared for how much work she was going to put into it! She showed up with her own wardrobe, with outfits that were like Marina’s. Cate even had some sort of dental things to make her look more like Marina. Sometimes I like to fancy myself the person who over-prepares and really gets into it—she was 10 times that. She could have done the whole episode on her own. The accent, the posture, oh man, it was incredible.

Even her skin had the right kind of… sheen.
Yeah! Whatever that quality is, she had it.

Did you see the MoMA show?
No! There was a line! I saw the movie and I love pieces like that, but I can never wait in line to see art. It’s not that I’m a snob, it’s that I can’t enjoy it if i’ve been waiting. It’s too much for me. I like a nice empty gallery, an empty performance.

Have you spoken to Marina about the episode at all?
No! I wish I did. I’ve never met her. Let her know that we are huge fans and we hope she likes it.

Why is she a good parody subject?
The boldness of her presence—and I know her documentary is called The Artist Is Present—there is something about that, the fact that it moved so many people. That, I think, is moving. If a band has a hit record, something worked, something resonated. I consider her to be somebody who had a hit piece, a hit art performance. It’s a rare thing to hit the mainstream. It happens sometimes 100 years after you’re dead. The fact that she did that in present day is really rare. How great is that? I really respect her art.

What’s your favorite part of the episode?
I like the footage of Cate putting the pail over her head with the marbles on the floor. It just made me laugh. It’s a silly part to it—I underestimate silliness.

I loved the Mr. Brainwash cameo. Any chance you guys would do a Exit Through the Gift Shop parody?
Maybe. It’s just too hard to really nail. We kind of did one on Portlandia, where one of the characters thought he was Banksy. He saw some graffiti and he was like, “oh that looks like my handwriting. I wonder if I’m Banksy?” Whenever you depict art, it’s very difficult because it can come off as just lazy or easy.

Source



BTS photos from Documentary Now Instagram

See visual guide of Cate’s perfomances on Documentary Now >>here

New trailer for Documentary Now! episode starring Cate Blanchett

New trailer for Documentary Now! episode starring Cate Blanchett

Hello everyone!

IFC network released a new trailer for Documentary Now! episode “Waiting for the artist” starring Cate Blanchett and Fred Armisen.
Waiting for the Artist” is a parody of “Marina Abramovic: The Artist Is Present” written by Seth Meyers and has Cate playing an artist called Izabella Barta. According to a recent Vox article:

In Documentary Now!’s version, which airs on March 6, Cate Blanchett plays an Abramovic-like character named Izabella Barta, and the result is as close to straight-up satire as the show ever gets, probably because the contemporary art world presents plenty to satirize. Instead of sticking to the confines of the original film, Documentary Now! constructs a winking acknowledgment of the complicated gender roles in the art world, with Armisen playing Barta’s “bad boy” ex-partner, who gets his due. It’s a thread that’s present in the world of the film, but it took “Waiting for the Artist” to pull it out. […]

Episode is set to air next week, March 06, Wed 11 pm on IFC. Stay tuned!!