Category: Theatre

When We Have Sufficiently Tortured Each Other: first reviews, poster, stills

When We Have Sufficiently Tortured Each Other: first reviews, poster, stills

Hello Blanchetters!

When We Have Sufficiently Tortured Each Other, new play by Martin Crimp starring Cate Blanchett and Game Of Thrones actor Stephen Dillane, opened yesterday night at the National Theatre. If you are not among the lucky ones that won the ticket ballot to see Cate’s National theatre debut, you can still try the day ticket queues, which is reported to have started from as early as 3am on some days. The play is at the Dorfman Theatre until March 2.
While we wait for more news, take a look at the poster, the stills and the first reviews of this new project. Enjoy!!


Poster

Stills

First Reviews

“When We Have Sufficiently Tortured Each Other, National Theatre review: Cate Blanchett shines in a play about an elaborate sex game” – Read Here Independent

“When We Have Sufficiently Tortured Each Other review – it’s explicit but hardly shocking” – Read here The Guardian

“Cate Blanchett’s S-and-M Play Is More Tiresome Than Titillating” – Read Here The New York Times

“When We Have Sufficiently Tortured Each Other, Dorfman Theatre, SE1” – Read here The Times UK

“Cate Blanchett in When We Have Sufficiently Tortured Each Other at the National Theatre” – Read Here London Theatre

“Were critics sufficiently tortured by Cate Blanchett’s National Theatre debut?” – Read Here Whats on Stage

“Review: When We Have Sufficiently Tortured Each Other… (National Theatre)” – Read Here Whats on Stage II

“When We Have Sufficiently Tortured Each Other” – Read Here Time Out

“When We Have Sufficiently Tortured Each Other review: Cate Blanchett’s charisma can’t redeem torpid show” – Read More Evenining Standard

“When We Have Sufficiently Tortured Each Other starring Cate Blanchett review at National Theatre – ‘arduous and opaque’” – Read Here The Stage

“When We Have Sufficiently Tortured Each Other, review: Cate Blanchett is lusty, but it feels like 12 scenes in search of a meaning” – Read Here Inews

“When We Have Sufficiently Tortured Each Other review: Cate Blanchett is flawless but the play is disappointing ” – Read Here Radio Times

“WHEN WE HAVE SUFFICIENTLY TORTURED EACH OTHER, National Theatre” – Read Here Broadway World

“When We Have Sufficiently Tortured Each Other, Dorfman Theatre review – Cate Blanchett’s underwhelming debut at the National” – Read Here The arts desk

“‘When We Have Sufficiently Tortured Each Other’: Theater Review” – Read Here The Hollywood Reporter

“When We Have Sufficiently Tortured Each Other, National Theatre review” – Read Here Culture Whisper

“Cate Blanchett’s S&M play is just the shock that tepid theatre needs” – Read Here The Guadian II

“Without Cate Blanchett’s presence this would be a torture to watch” – Read Here The Daily Telegragh

“Why is Cate Blanchett in this load of phooey? QUENTIN LETTS reviews When We Have Sufficiently Tortured Each Other” – Read Here Daily Mail

New Interview | Cate Blanchett: ‘I see theatre as a provocation’

New Interview | Cate Blanchett: ‘I see theatre as a provocation’

Hello Blanchetters!!

Who’s ready to see Cate’s debut at the National Theatre in London?
Here’s the first interview about When We Have Sufficiently Tortured Each Other opening on 16 January.
You can read it on the scans or below. Enjoy!

Click on the image to download from the gallery

Click on the image to download from the gallery

Cate Blanchett strides into the room and plomps herself down on the sofa. In front of us – this is meant to be lunch – a table is piled high with sandwiches, fruit, salads and a copy of the script she has spent all morning rehearsing. She prods at it with a finger, hooting with laughter. “Any pointers?” she asks. I glance across at the other sofa, where Martin Crimp, the playwright, is settling himself in. He gazes back impassively. This might be a joke; it might not.

We’re backstage at the National Theatre to discuss Blanchett’s appearance in Crimp’s new play – her debut here, and her first appearance on the London stage in seven years. Also squeezing on to the sofas are Blanchett’s director, Katie Mitchell, and her co-star Stephen Dillane. To call the production hotly anticipated is something of an undersell: demand for tickets was so high that the theatre was forced to introduce a Hamilton-style ballot (a few day tickets are left, if you’re able to queue). Even from the vantage point of not-quite-mid-January, this looks like being one of the biggest plays of the year.

Working out what kind of play Crimp has come up with, however, is trickier, as Blanchett and her colleagues readily admit. Entitled When We Have Sufficiently Tortured Each Other, it is – at least on paper – a loose adaptation of Samuel Richardson’s 1740 proto-novel Pamela. Relating the story of a young maidservant’s relationship with her employer, the book scandalised readers when it was first published. Composed of a series of letters in which Pamela relates how she is pursued by the mysterious “Mr B”, then sexually assaulted, it ends with her finally (and apparently enthusiastically) agreeing to marry him. It’s been called everything from tawdry S&M to a set of case notes for Stockholm syndrome.

“It’s an archetypal story: Beauty and the Beast,” says Crimp. “Or, to be more blunt, predator and prey.”

In the play, the problems of the novel are sharpened. Although the characters played by Blanchett and Dillane often resemble Pamela and Mr B, at other times they seem to blur into each other, or transform into other people entirely. At the play’s opening, the scenario seems grimly clear: Mr B is a bullying despot, Pamela his cowering victim. A few scenes in, however – there are 12 in all, each responding to a different fragment or aspect of the novel – the ground has begun to shift. Images of voyeurism and violence proliferate: is the audience being challenged, titillated, or both? Is, in fact, the woman controlling her master, rather than the other way around?

Dillane says: “There’s a line in the play, ‘I took you – against your will – was it against your will? – jury’s out.’” He pauses. “That’s the question: who’s doing what to whom?”

The script reminds Blanchett of the boundary-breaking writers Rachel Cusk and Maggie Nelson: “A lot of the things the play brings up is stuff I’ve been thinking about for a long time. The boundaries of gender, how language constantly fails us and confines us, keeps us in paradigms and frameworks which are frustrating and confounding.”

Mitchell doesn’t want to reveal too much about what audiences will see when the lights go down – “That’s a spoiler!” she laughs – but says the production will be set in the present day, not a periwig or petticoat in sight. “No Downton Abbey,” she adds, in case anyone was expecting it.

[…]

As a stage actor, too, Blanchett has been eager to take chances. In 2006, she put a burgeoning movie career on ice to move back to Australia and run Sydney Theatre Company with her husband, the playwright-screenwriter Andrew Upton. Though Blanchett stepped down from the co-directorship in 2012, she appeared opposite Isabelle Huppert in STC’s production of Genet’s The Maids and made her Broadway debut in 2017 in Upton’s version of Chekhov’s Platonov.

The last time she was in London, it was in another Crimp text – a translation of the German playwright Botho Strauss’s Big and Small. It offered a white-knuckle portrait of a woman disintegrating before our eyes – one second happily gossiping and flirting, the next keening and clawing the floor in anguish.

How on earth does she decide which roles will suit her? “If you read a work and you know what it is, I don’t know why you’d bother rehearsing it,” she replies crisply. “You always have to risk failure. The more recognisable you are, the more expectation there is around you, the harder it is to carve out that space. But you have to.”

Being among artists who challenge her is a powerful attraction, she adds, which is partly why this particular project was a no-brainer: “I’m not going to lock myself in a room for my own enjoyment or pain. The process is really important.”

I’m wondering how she and her colleagues are approaching the wider politics of this play about the relationship between a predatory, all-powerful man and a woman being employed as a sexual plaything. British theatre was quick to channel the impulses of the #MeToo movement, at least on stage. Blanchett has often spoken about the issue, and pursued it doggedly when she chaired the jury at last year’s Cannes festival.

Crimp points out that he began sketching the script three years ago. But Mitchell says, for her, the play can’t really be about anything else, at least right now. “Of course we think about it. It’s a very live environment at the moment. It would be impossible not to.”

Blanchett is nodding passionately. “You make a piece for the time you’re in, otherwise it’s not relevant. What’s the point of doing it?”

So how do they think audiences might respond? “I always see theatre as a provocation,” she says. “You’re not up there running for office, you’re asking a series of questions. Some people might be enraged, some perplexed, some people might be excited. Hopefully it’s the conversation afterwards that’s the most important.”

Behind the scenes in British theatre, there seems to be a new determination to correct age-old imbalances: gender-equal and ethnically diverse casts, more plays written and directed by women, more awareness that theatre actually needs to look like the world that surrounds it. Do they feel things are finally starting to change?

Mitchell looks faintly weary. “For me, it’s hard. I feel like I’ve been telling these stories for, like, 30 years. I think the whole thing started before it started, if that makes sense.”

She adds: “It’s like #MeToo was the boiling point. It’s been simmering a long time.”

How about Blanchett, given that she moves so freely between the film and theatre worlds? Like Mitchell, she was talking about so many of these issues long before they became daily headlines.

She looks ruminative: I sense a reluctance to give too pat an answer. “We’re still in the process where the rage is bubbling up,” she suggests eventually, then gestures around her. “But when I come to a theatre company like this, I can feel it inside the building. Inclusion isn’t just box-ticking, it’s opening new ways of making work, new types of work.”
[…]

Read Full text here

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First promotional image of Cate Blanchett’s National Theatre debut play

First promotional image of Cate Blanchett’s National Theatre debut play

Hello folks!

Great news today!

The National Theatre has released the first promotional image for When we have sufficiently tortured each other: Twelve Variations on Samuel Richardson’s Pamela featuring Cate Blanchett. The online ballot to get tickets for the performance will begin on Thursday. Don’t miss this chance! Good luck Blanchetters!

The Aussie acting ledge is making her NT debut. Think you can’t get in? Don’t lose hope: here are your best bets for bagging a gold-dust ticket

What is it?

International movie star and all-round Aussie legend Cate Blanchett will be starring in a new play at the National Theatre, entitled ‘When We Have Sufficiently Tortured Each Other’, opposite Stephen Dillane (of ‘Game of Thrones’ and more).

How popular will it be?

Blanchett’s name would no doubt shift all the tickets in a jiffy and crash all the servers for the best part of a day if the play’s six-week run was in the NT’s huge Olivier theatre. But it’s in fact at the 450-seat Dorfman, the NT’s smallest venue, so, er, go figure.

How do I get tickets?

It’s pretty simple: there will be no conventional sale. Instead, from noon on Thursday (November 22) to noon the following Thursday (November 29) you can go to the NT website and register for an online ballot. Names will be drawn from the electronic ‘hat’ on Friday November 30. Winners will be given the chance to purchase up to two tickets in the conventional fashion (members will get to book first). It’s a similar system to the one adopted by Tom Hiddleston’s ‘Hamlet’ and the last Punchdrunk show – a lot of people will be disappointed, but at least it’ll be ‘fair’ in terms of the chance of buying a ticket.

Er, what’s the actual play again?

Good question! It’s avant-garde playwright Martin Crimp and avant-garde director Katie Mitchell teaming up to direct what is presumably going to be a fairly leftfield play that explores the nature of desire, and is apparently inspired by Samuel Richardson’s 1740 novel, ‘Pamela’. There has been some grumbling from Mitchell stans that Blanchett’s presence is likely to stop them seeing their hero’s latest endeavour. Which may be true, but don‘t let that stop you applying for tickets. Just bear in mind if you win them that you’ll probably need to brace yourself for what’s likely to be a fairly challenging night of theatre.

Is there any other way of getting tickets?

Yes: a number of cheap day-seats for each evening’s show will be released at the NT’s box office, in person only, at 9.30am each morning. It’ll be first come, first served – the odds are you will have to queue from the early hours of the morning. But if you want to see it – you can.

‘When We Have Sufficiently Tortured Each Other’ is at the National Theatre, Dorfman. Jan 16-Mar 2 2019.

Source

For more information click HERE

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News | Cate Blanchett’s National Theatre debut

News | Cate Blanchett’s National Theatre debut

Hey Blanchetters!!

It looks like we can finally plan our travel to London again!
New information on When we have sufficiently tortured each other, new play featuring Cate Blanchett , has been released! Here’s everything to know so far and how to get tickets for the show.

General Info:

When We Have Sufficiently Tortured Each Other: Twelve Variations on Samuel Richardson’s Pamela
Dorfman Theatre from 16 January to 2 March 2019.
Running Time: tbc

Ticket prices:

Monday – Thursday eves, all matinees £54 – £10
Friday & Saturday eves £58 – £10

Previews:

16 – 22 January £37 – £10

Day Tickets: On the day of the performance, a limited number of cheap Day Tickets will be available in person from 9.30am.

Tickets will go on sale via a ballot which opens on 22 November at 12 pm (more info below).

Events:

Press Night: 23 January
Actor Cate Blanchett on When We Have… Fri 1 February, 4pm

Extra Info:

Content advisory
Please note: This production contains adult themes and scenes of a sexual nature. If you require further information, contact details are provided in our Help centre.

Ballot
Due to limited ticket numbers and anticipated high demand, a ballot will operate across all performances of When We Have Sufficiently Tortured Each Other instead of a general sale.

Day Tickets: On the day of the performance, a limited number of cheap Day Tickets will be available in person from 9.30am.

The Ballot will be open from 12 noon on Thursday 22 November to 12 noon on Thursday 29 November.

Ballot winners booking dates: Supporting Cast and Young Patron Premium Ballot winners From 12 noon on Monday 3 December, to 12 noon on Tuesday 4 December

Priority and Priority Plus Members, Young Patron Member and Young Patron Associates and Advance Member Ballot winners From 12 noon on Wednesday 5 December, to 12 noon on Thursday 6 December

Public Booking Ballot winners From 12 noon on Friday 7 December, to 12 noon on Saturday 8 December

For further details on how to enter the ballot, make sure you’re signed up to NT News.

When We Have Sufficiently Tortured Each Other, Twelve Variations on Samuel Richardson’s Pamela.
Martin Crimp’s play breaks through the surface of contemporary debate to explore the messy, often violent nature of desire, and the fluid, complicated roles that men and women play. Using Richardson’s novel as a provocation, six characters act out a dangerous game of sexual domination and resistance. Directed by Katie Mitchell, Cate Blanchett makes her National Theatre debut alongside Stephen Dillane. The cast also includes Babirye Bukilwa, Jessica Gunning, Emma Hindle and Craig Miller. With set design by Vicki Mortimer, costume design by Sussie Juhlin-Wallén, lighting design by James Farncombe, sound design by Melanie Wilson and movement direction by Joseph Alford.

Source

For more information click HERE

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Gallery Mass Update (1989-1999)

Gallery Mass Update (1989-1999)

Hello Blanchetters!

We have one of the best mass update so far: we have found, organized and collected rare and unseen material starting from 1992, from theatre, to tv series, going from newspapers to photoshoots, with some new pics from movies and events. We are really proud of this work and to be able to share it with everyone in the fandom, so without further ado, enjoy (and support us)! Our many thanks to Maria-Jose who donated some scans.
p.s. Every thumbs below open an album with new or updated pictures























Cate Blanchett to debut at National Theatre in new Martin Crimp play in January 2019

Cate Blanchett to debut at National Theatre in new Martin Crimp play in January 2019

Hello Blanchetters!

Great news today! Time to go to London!

Cate Blanchett is set to debut at National Theatre (London) in a new Martin Crimp play directed by Katie Mitchell in January 2019. The actress will star allongside Stephen Dillane in a new play by Martin Crimp called WHEN WE HAVE SUFFICIENTLY TORTURED EACH OTHER: TWELVE VARIATIONS ON SAMUEL RICHARDSON’S PAMELA.

According to the press release:

Martin Crimp’s play breaks through the surface of contemporary debate to explore the
messy, often violent nature of desire, and the fluid, complicated roles that men and women
play.
Using Richardson’s novel as a provocation, five characters act out a dangerous game of
sexual domination and resistance.

Tickets will go on sale in autumn 2018 when more details will be announced by the National Theatre.

Stay tuned!!!

Source