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Cate Blanchett covers Interview Magazine March 2019 issue

Cate Blanchett covers Interview Magazine March 2019 issue

Hey Blanchetters!

The first magazine cover and photoshoot of 2019 have arrived! Cate looks amazing!
Cate Blanchett is on the cover of the new issue of Interview Magazine and with a brand new interview by fellow actress Julia Roberts. Take a look!

The Inimitable Cate Blanchett Asks Julia Roberts the Timeless Question: Is Enough Enough?

Cate Blanchett does not play nice. Her performances almost always hinge on the unhinged. Although she is nothing if not regal—audiences will forever remember her as Queen Elizabeth I, a part that earned her the first of her seven Oscar nominations—Blanchett has never backed away from malice and mania, or what she describes as the “King Lear end of the spectrum.” The 49-year-old Australian actress has stalked down the darker corridors of human complexity by inhabiting a sexually repressed housewife in Carol, a shrill and martini-drowned socialite in Blue Jasmine, and, most recently, an agoraphobic architect in Richard Linklater’s adaptation of the Maria Semple novel Where’d You Go, Bernadette, out later this year. And yet, from a hotel room near London’s National Theatre, where she has been taking the stage in a production of When We Have Sufficiently Tortured Each Other, Blanchett wonders whether enough is enough. From across the ocean, at home in Los Angeles, Julia Roberts helps her grapple with the answer.

———

JULIA ROBERTS: Hello, Queen Cate.

CATE BLANCHETT: Hello, movie star. You want to know something? We just had your film Ben Is Back on, I kid you not. It made me cry after five minutes. And then, being totally brain-dead, I suddenly thought, “What day is it?” An alarm went off in my head, and I went, “I’ve got to go talk to that actress lady!”

ROBERTS: You want to talk about being brain-dead? I’ve had the craziest day. I woke up sick, and I was at Urgent Care for an hour and a half with one of my son’s friends who cut his foot when he was surfing. He got eight stitches.

BLANCHETT: You are a good friend. I’ve just had a half-bottle of red after a rather challenging day of rehearsal for a play I’m doing at the National Theatre [When We Have Sufficiently Tortured Each Other]. As you get older, acting just gets more and more humiliating. When I was younger, I would wonder why the older actors I admired kept talking about quitting. Now I realize it’s because they want to maintain a connection to the last shreds of their sanity. As I get older, I ask myself if I still want to submit myself to the shamanistic end of this profession and go completely into madness. It’s the King Lear end of the spectrum of what we do, right? So I’m on the proverbial couch thinking, “Do I want to go that direction, or do I actually want to live a life?”

ROBERTS: The great thing about doing theater is that there’s never really a “This is it” moment. There’s that alchemy every night.

BLANCHETT: And I certainly love that alchemy as an audience member.

ROBERTS: What are you up to right now?

BLANCHETT: At the moment I’m thinking, “Where do the radical ideas actually exist?” I gravitate toward museums and galleries but often they tend to speak predominantly to audiences that have time to go into that quietude. There are such large sections of our communities that don’t have the time because they’re working two or three jobs. But what I love about those things is that they get to deal with abstract ideas. We get so used to these narrative structures, but there are certain ideas that don’t fit into that slot, so I’m finding my work with visual artists or choreographers more rewarding at the moment than the cookie-cutter projects.

ROBERTS: For someone like you, it probably has to do with the fact that you have accomplished so many things on such an incredibly creative level.

BLANCHETT: Maybe it’s just time to stop.

ROBERTS: Stop saying that.

BLANCHETT: No, but it really is. I have to go onstage in my underwear yet again, and I’m thinking, “Why? Why don’t I just feed the chickens and read Proust?” It’s on my bookshelf staring at me right now. All these volumes I have purchased and not yet read. Why have I not picked those up? Why am I still bothering to make movies? Why do you make movies?

ROBERTS: They call to me.

BLANCHETT: Is it a response to someone else’s idea of who you might be?

ROBERTS: I think the first time that Danny [Moder, Roberts’s husband] and I worked together after we were married was the first time that I suddenly thought, “Oh my gosh, what I do for a living is so silly. I’m calling myself a different name. I’m wearing somebody else’s clothes. And I’m basically playing pretend on a huge scale.” I had never been so self-conscious until I was suddenly doing it in front of my husband, thinking, “What must he think?”

BLANCHETT: When you’re so inside a richly lived life, you suddenly think, “Do I need to pretend to live inside these other experiences?” When you have a richly lived experience, you can empathetically extrapolate out from there. That’s what women like Rachel Cusk and Maggie Nelson do in their writing. And that’s where I found Bernadette. I recognized something very deeply about a creative life that shuts down.

ROBERTS: And yet, you want to stay home and feed the chickens.

BLANCHETT: I’m quite happy sitting here looking at my unread Proust, talking to you and feeding my pigs. I was a vegetarian for years when my husband wanted to get pigs. I said, “I’ll get pigs as long as we tell the kids that the sausages and bacon they eat are from our pigs.” We called them Benson and Hedges.

ROBERTS: You can’t name something that you’re going to kill. That’s the number-one rule of being a farmer.

BLANCHETT: [Laughs.]

ROBERTS: And now they’re in the freezer.

BLANCHETT: It was this Machiavellian vegetarian plan that I had for my kids, that they would form this deep connection with the piglets, which were very cute and smelled kind of like smelly people. And then I would tell them that if we eat sausages, they’re coming from these pigs. The kids were just totally fine with that and I was horrified. My plan to turn my family vegetarian was a monumental failure.

ROBERTS: What type of roles do you automatically turn down? Is there such a thing?

BLANCHETT: When I feel like it’s a pre-masticated version of something I’ve already done? Like a margarine commercial, where the agency thinks, “This worked before, so, hey, let’s do it again!” After I played Queen Elizabeth, I got offered myriad roles that were basically the same story with a different costume. There was no potential for discovering anything new. There’s no risk.

ROBERTS: In Where’d You Go, Bernadette, you play the spouse of Billy Crudup, one of my favorite actors and someone who played my spouse in a film [Eat Pray Love].

BLANCHETT: We worked together years ago on a film in France called Charlotte Gray. He’s so open and egoless. As we all know, that is rare in a male actor. How many times have you and I said, “That’s a great role—I’m not the lead, but the male lead is a great actor and I’d really love to be a part of this project”? Invert that, and you don’t have a lot of men who would come to the party in the same way for a woman. Billy is one of those guys who says yes. It’s rare that you get an actor of his caliber who is prepared to play the so-called “husband role.” The best thing for me about this post–[Harvey] Weinstein era is the opportunity to learn from it. We can change the structure, to have horizontal conversations rather than hierarchical ones. That’s a matriarchy. I think the opportunity here is to reinvent the power structure so that it is genuinely more inclusive. It’s not about competition—it’s about collaboration.

ROBERTS: You’re incredible. Honestly, I could sit and just listen to you talk about things for hours.

BLANCHETT: I wish I were interviewing you. It feels a little like a veil has been lifted, and we’re talking to one another in a muscular way about stuff that we’ve had to deal with. We can all pretend that we live in a community, but we actually live in a capitalist environment and our worth is being measured in dollars. It’s a really boring conversation to have because when you talk about the creative industry, it’s always seen as, “Well, you’re famous. You’ve got the opportunity to do this, and now you’re being greedy to talk about money.” But you’re not. You’re talking about really practical things such as residuals, producing credits, insurance. In the end, you’re actually talking about status. And status opens doors, whether you’re in the banking sector or the film industry or whatever. They’re not attractive conversations. They’re not conversations that women are traditionally meant to have because we’re expected to be more demure, but there are certainly robust “masculine” compensations that are had by our male counterparts, so why shouldn’t we be a part of that dialogue?

ROBERTS: Do you have a nickname?

BLANCHETT: Maybe it should be Blabbermouth? Sometimes my husband calls me Poss, like possum. Do you have one?

ROBERTS: When my kids’ friends were little, they couldn’t say Julia, because it’s a lot of syllables, so they’d call me Juju. They still call me that.

BLANCHETT: That is really sweet. You are such a mensch.

ROBERTS: Juju and Poss, a love story.

———


Source

New Interview | Cate Blanchett: ‘I see theatre as a provocation’

New Interview | Cate Blanchett: ‘I see theatre as a provocation’

Hello Blanchetters!!

Who’s ready to see Cate’s debut at the National Theatre in London?
Here’s the first interview about When We Have Sufficiently Tortured Each Other opening on 16 January.
You can read it on the scans or below. Enjoy!

Click on the image to download from the gallery

Click on the image to download from the gallery

Cate Blanchett strides into the room and plomps herself down on the sofa. In front of us – this is meant to be lunch – a table is piled high with sandwiches, fruit, salads and a copy of the script she has spent all morning rehearsing. She prods at it with a finger, hooting with laughter. “Any pointers?” she asks. I glance across at the other sofa, where Martin Crimp, the playwright, is settling himself in. He gazes back impassively. This might be a joke; it might not.

We’re backstage at the National Theatre to discuss Blanchett’s appearance in Crimp’s new play – her debut here, and her first appearance on the London stage in seven years. Also squeezing on to the sofas are Blanchett’s director, Katie Mitchell, and her co-star Stephen Dillane. To call the production hotly anticipated is something of an undersell: demand for tickets was so high that the theatre was forced to introduce a Hamilton-style ballot (a few day tickets are left, if you’re able to queue). Even from the vantage point of not-quite-mid-January, this looks like being one of the biggest plays of the year.

Working out what kind of play Crimp has come up with, however, is trickier, as Blanchett and her colleagues readily admit. Entitled When We Have Sufficiently Tortured Each Other, it is – at least on paper – a loose adaptation of Samuel Richardson’s 1740 proto-novel Pamela. Relating the story of a young maidservant’s relationship with her employer, the book scandalised readers when it was first published. Composed of a series of letters in which Pamela relates how she is pursued by the mysterious “Mr B”, then sexually assaulted, it ends with her finally (and apparently enthusiastically) agreeing to marry him. It’s been called everything from tawdry S&M to a set of case notes for Stockholm syndrome.

“It’s an archetypal story: Beauty and the Beast,” says Crimp. “Or, to be more blunt, predator and prey.”

In the play, the problems of the novel are sharpened. Although the characters played by Blanchett and Dillane often resemble Pamela and Mr B, at other times they seem to blur into each other, or transform into other people entirely. At the play’s opening, the scenario seems grimly clear: Mr B is a bullying despot, Pamela his cowering victim. A few scenes in, however – there are 12 in all, each responding to a different fragment or aspect of the novel – the ground has begun to shift. Images of voyeurism and violence proliferate: is the audience being challenged, titillated, or both? Is, in fact, the woman controlling her master, rather than the other way around?

Dillane says: “There’s a line in the play, ‘I took you – against your will – was it against your will? – jury’s out.’” He pauses. “That’s the question: who’s doing what to whom?”

The script reminds Blanchett of the boundary-breaking writers Rachel Cusk and Maggie Nelson: “A lot of the things the play brings up is stuff I’ve been thinking about for a long time. The boundaries of gender, how language constantly fails us and confines us, keeps us in paradigms and frameworks which are frustrating and confounding.”

Mitchell doesn’t want to reveal too much about what audiences will see when the lights go down – “That’s a spoiler!” she laughs – but says the production will be set in the present day, not a periwig or petticoat in sight. “No Downton Abbey,” she adds, in case anyone was expecting it.

[…]

As a stage actor, too, Blanchett has been eager to take chances. In 2006, she put a burgeoning movie career on ice to move back to Australia and run Sydney Theatre Company with her husband, the playwright-screenwriter Andrew Upton. Though Blanchett stepped down from the co-directorship in 2012, she appeared opposite Isabelle Huppert in STC’s production of Genet’s The Maids and made her Broadway debut in 2017 in Upton’s version of Chekhov’s Platonov.

The last time she was in London, it was in another Crimp text – a translation of the German playwright Botho Strauss’s Big and Small. It offered a white-knuckle portrait of a woman disintegrating before our eyes – one second happily gossiping and flirting, the next keening and clawing the floor in anguish.

How on earth does she decide which roles will suit her? “If you read a work and you know what it is, I don’t know why you’d bother rehearsing it,” she replies crisply. “You always have to risk failure. The more recognisable you are, the more expectation there is around you, the harder it is to carve out that space. But you have to.”

Being among artists who challenge her is a powerful attraction, she adds, which is partly why this particular project was a no-brainer: “I’m not going to lock myself in a room for my own enjoyment or pain. The process is really important.”

I’m wondering how she and her colleagues are approaching the wider politics of this play about the relationship between a predatory, all-powerful man and a woman being employed as a sexual plaything. British theatre was quick to channel the impulses of the #MeToo movement, at least on stage. Blanchett has often spoken about the issue, and pursued it doggedly when she chaired the jury at last year’s Cannes festival.

Crimp points out that he began sketching the script three years ago. But Mitchell says, for her, the play can’t really be about anything else, at least right now. “Of course we think about it. It’s a very live environment at the moment. It would be impossible not to.”

Blanchett is nodding passionately. “You make a piece for the time you’re in, otherwise it’s not relevant. What’s the point of doing it?”

So how do they think audiences might respond? “I always see theatre as a provocation,” she says. “You’re not up there running for office, you’re asking a series of questions. Some people might be enraged, some perplexed, some people might be excited. Hopefully it’s the conversation afterwards that’s the most important.”

Behind the scenes in British theatre, there seems to be a new determination to correct age-old imbalances: gender-equal and ethnically diverse casts, more plays written and directed by women, more awareness that theatre actually needs to look like the world that surrounds it. Do they feel things are finally starting to change?

Mitchell looks faintly weary. “For me, it’s hard. I feel like I’ve been telling these stories for, like, 30 years. I think the whole thing started before it started, if that makes sense.”

She adds: “It’s like #MeToo was the boiling point. It’s been simmering a long time.”

How about Blanchett, given that she moves so freely between the film and theatre worlds? Like Mitchell, she was talking about so many of these issues long before they became daily headlines.

She looks ruminative: I sense a reluctance to give too pat an answer. “We’re still in the process where the rage is bubbling up,” she suggests eventually, then gestures around her. “But when I come to a theatre company like this, I can feel it inside the building. Inclusion isn’t just box-ticking, it’s opening new ways of making work, new types of work.”
[…]

Read Full text here

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News: Magazine Scans+Interviews + Behind the Scene Picture + More

News: Magazine Scans+Interviews + Behind the Scene Picture + More

Hello Blanchetters!

It has been a quiet week considering how busy Cate has been for the last few weeks. Today we are posting content released during the week; first IndieWire released an interview with greek director Yorgos Lanthimos, who confessed Cate has reached out and wants to work with him. Maybe this is Cate’s next big collaboration? We’ll see! Meanwhile, here’s a fragment of the interview:

But there’s one major actor who has been eager to work with Lanthimos long before he made inroads to English-language productions. “Cate Blanchett was the first one that reached out,” Lanthimos said, in an interview with IndieWire from New York, while promoting the upcoming release of “The Favourite” and recalling the immediate aftermath of “Dogtooth.” “I’m still in contact with Cate, and we are trying to do something together.”
Blanchett has yet to speak publicly of her affinity for Lanthimos’ work, and representatives for the actress declined to comment. Nevertheless, a collaboration with Lanthimos would be a natural gamble for the A-list performer, whose stable of auteur collaborators includes Woody Allen, Terrence Malick, Todd Haynes, and Martin Scorsese. Lanthimos and Blanchett have overlapped at festivals in recent years: “The Lobster” was in competition at Cannes the same year as Haynes’ “Carol,” and Blanchett was spotted at the Venice International Film Festival premiere of “The Favourite” in late August.
“I’ve been so fortunate to work with great directors,” she told IndieWire in 2013. “In the end, I think that’s driving the conversation.”
Lanthimos added that Weisz reached out to him shortly after he heard from Blanchett — and as the cast of “The Favourite” proves, they weren’t the only actresses drawn to his work. “It was mostly women who reached out,” he said. “I don’t know what that says about my work, the work they were getting, or about male actors.” Regardless, he welcomed them into his domain. “It is true that the way the system works, you need name actors in order to put things together when you make English-language films,” he said. “I took great care in making sure that all these people reaching out wanted to be a part of it because of what the work was, not because something different might happen, and that they actually appreciated the work.”

Source

While promoting IWC watches in Shanghai last week, Cate gave this interview to Fashion Ifeng where she talks about female and male perspectives in fashion and in cinema.

We have also added magazine scans from Harper’s Bazaar Taiwan, i Look Magazine and Cine Premiere Mexico to our Gallery and a little behind the scenes picture from “The House with a Clock in Its Walls” set, published by Loop Weekly. Enjoy!

“The House with a Clock in Its Walls” – Interviews + Still

“The House with a Clock in Its Walls” – Interviews + Still

Hello everyone!

“The House with a Clock in Its Walls” is being released around the world so we are getting some interviews from some places around the globe. We have added a new still and two interviews; one from El Pais Uruguay and The New Zealand Herald. Enjoy!

Click on the image to download the HQ version available in the gallery

Click on the image to download the HQ version available in the gallery

Click on the image to download the HQ version available in the gallery

W Magazine October 2018 – The Female Gaze: Guest Editor Cate Blanchett

W Magazine October 2018 – The Female Gaze: Guest Editor Cate Blanchett

Hello Bees and Blanchetters! Today is Christmas!
The long awaited special issue of W Magazine is here! The site released sneak peak of the new issue of the magazine, with four covers, nine, and I repeat, nine photoshoots featuring Cate, plus two shorts films, a video interview and a converation with Miuccia Prada. Our lovely lady is coming to be a guest editor after her first foray 18 years ago for Harper’s Bazaar Australia. Read everything below and enjoy!

Cate Blanchett, Interpreted: 9 Female Artists and Photographers Expose the Actress’s Power as a Muse in a Special Issue of W Magazine

At the Cannes Film Festival this year, 82 women, all of whom have starred in, directed, written, or otherwise worked on movies, including many that have been shown over the festival’s 72-year history, were celebrated together on the long red carpet that leads to the Grand Théâtre Lumière. It was a beautiful and profound statement that spoke directly to the #MeToo movement. Instead of commiserating about injustice, these women, from different backgrounds and countries, were proudly displaying their talent, range, and creativity. It was an active gesture of solidarity. “We need to remake the industry in a new and fresh way,” said Cate Blanchett, who was the head of the jury in Cannes and is also the guest editor of this issue of W. Our idea was to create something similar to that amazing female empowerment scene in Cannes: to show what female photographers, artists, directors, and stylists can create. This issue, spearheaded by the greatest actress of her generation (who, most recently, plays a complex witch in The House With a Clock in Its Walls, out on September 21), is an extraordinary ode to the female gaze. All of our contributors in these pages are women. For Blanchett, who was the muse for nine of these varied talents in this cover portfolio—including Alex Prager, who cast her in a murder mystery; Cass Bird, who captured Blanchett on the night of her Ocean’s 8 premiere, in Times Square; and Shirin Neshat, who envisioned her as a raven-haired chanteuse—the breadth of vision was thrilling. “I don’t like to generalize about gender,” Blanchett explained, “but, for me, the biggest question was: Why haven’t I worked with these remarkable women more?! Where have they been?” They are here. World: Take notice.

Source


Some on set pictures, taken on June 7 in New York


Cate Blanchett, In Her Own Words, On Guest Editing a Special Issue of W Magazine
“Such are the two ways of the Photograph. The choice is mine: to subject its spectacle to the civilized code of perfect illusions, or to confront in it the wakening of intractable reality.” —Roland Barthes

Every photograph presents us with this fork in the road, but if we keep going down the same old path, we only ever get the same old answer. This issue is the other path: all female collaborators, female photographers, female visions, creative acts, aspirations, and endeavors. And that’s just the tip of the iceberg.

I’m wary of mission statements, expressions of vision. I prefer opening gambits, perhaps. Starting points. Launching pads. Language is all-important, and the way one begins a conversation, whether it be with a director, the W team, or, indeed, the W readers, will influence the way the project and its outcomes unfold. I’d like to think this issue is one such opening gambit. A provocation to look at life through a different lens. We hope it’s a fresh, exciting, and inclusive one.

Insanely busy as all the photographers were, they ­perforated their schedules to be part of what felt like an exploration of possibilities: a mash-up, a riotous juxtaposition of wildly different creative perspectives. And whoa!…did we laugh. Running around New York City in the middle of the night with Cass Bird; frolicking through the daisies in the English countryside with Sharna Osborne; lip-synching with Shirin Neshat; typing—bunny style—with Sam Taylor-Johnson; et cetera, et cetera, et cetera. And then, being in conversation with the incomparable Miuccia Prada and brainstorming with the indefatigable, fearless, adventurous, and profoundly generous W team.

I hope the energy and va-va-voom that has gone into this issue leaps off the pages and into your hearts and minds. It certainly got my creative juices flowing…
With love,

Source


When Miuccia Prada was immersing herself in the student politics of Milan at the end of the 1960s, fashion was not considered a suitable career for an educated young Italian woman of means. And when Cate Blanchett was growing up in suburban Melbourne amid the struggles for equal pay and paid maternity leave of 1970s Australia, acting seemed, at best, a navel-gazing indulgence. So the paths that young Miuccia and Cate went on to take were perhaps the most radical ones available to them—by their second-wave feminist sisters’ estimation, at least. They each got married and followed their hearts’ desires, doing whatever gave them pleasure.
The strategy worked out well for both of them. Since Prada took over her parents’ leather goods company in the ’70s, which the designer still runs with Patrizio Bertelli, whom she married in 1987, she has turned it into a $11.4 billion enterprise, one comprising not only a hugely influential fashion label but also an increasingly important cultural institution: the Fondazione Prada, whose Rem Koolhaas–designed space in Milan opened in 2015. Blanchett was already an accomplished stage actor when she met the director Andrew Upton in 1996, and together, as the husband-and-wife artistic directors of Sydney Theatre Company, they went on to run an ambitious stage program for five years, as Blanchett’s movie career went interstellar. Now a two-time Oscar winner and the recipient of a staggering 149 other awards, she is one of the actors most respected by other actors—an ambition, she says, she held from Day One.
Success may have set Prada, 69, and Blanchett, 49, apart from their respective peers, but what has made them an inspiration for other women is how their work communicates beyond appearances—Prada’s by inspiring desire in her consumers, while reassuring them they have made an intelligent, discerning choice; Blanchett’s through roles that provoke as well as seduce her audience. For this portfolio, the pair reversed this scenario, highlighting women whose work and lives inspire them, and who are pictured below.

Penny Martin: Are you two old friends?

Miuccia Prada: We met at the Guggenheim in 2007. The artist ­Francesco Vezzoli put on a play, Right You Are (If You Think You Are), and Cate was in it.

Cate Blanchett: Yes, by Pirandello. It was something! We never rehearsed it. Everyone assembled in the morning to read the play once, and then we took over the museum. It was so risky. Elaine Stritch was there, which was the highlight of my life.

Martin: Mrs. Prada, is it true you studied mime?

Prada: Yes. There was this theater in Milan called the Piccolo Teatro, where all the clever people were in the ’60s, and I wanted to be with them. I was studying political science at the time, but mime sounded more interesting to me. Afterward, I hated it, but I studied for five years, and I think it taught me discipline. You know Decroux, the father of mime? One day, he limited us to only moving our fingers—the body control was extreme.

Blanchett: When you’re studying something wordy like politics, the minimalism of a simple gesture can be powerful.

Prada: In those days, I was heavily into politics and rebellion. I never set foot in the university, except for exams. I was too involved in politics.

Blanchett: On campus?

Prada: No, in the Union of Women. I was active for years but hated speaking in public, so I gradually began working at my parents’ company, which was the worst thing you could ever do in the ’60s and ’70s, as a feminist—to work in the fashion industry. I was ashamed, but I liked it so much.

Martin: Why ashamed? Because clothing was perceived as feminine and thus lightweight?

Prada: Yes, the idea that fashion is stupid.

Blanchett: And I don’t think much has changed. I still get battered if I express an interest in costume or fashion.
Prada: It’s the toughest industry to work in. But you know what has made me appreciate my job? The super-clever people around me—directors, artists, and intellectuals who appreciate the ideas. I have always believed in collaborations and made sure I worked with and supported female artists. With the Fondazione, in addition to Laurie Anderson and Goshka Macuga, we have done amazing projects with Mariko Mori, Louise Bourgeois, Nathalie Djurberg, and others. In cinema, we have worked with great female directors for the short films we commission for our “Miu Miu Women’s Tales” series, and recently even with cartoonists in our Prada collection. It’s because I’m a successful fashion designer that I’m able to realize the artwork. My job is being the anchor.

Martin: Cate, your story reads less like one of rebellion than of destiny. Weren’t you acting, directing, and producing when you were still at school?

Blanchett: Yes, but it’s like I never chose acting. Even coming out of drama school, I said I would give it five years. Every time I’ve been pregnant, I’ve said I’m going back to finish my university degree—I studied fine arts and economics. You know, theater and cinema may be fundamental to the national cultural identity in the U.K. or Italy, but in Australia acting or writing is so utterly irrelevant to the fabric of society.

Prada: What is valued there?

Blanchett: Physical exercise—they like a triumph over the elements. That and when people achieve things overseas. They don’t appreciate it when it’s in their own backyard.

Martin: You spent five years as co–artistic director of Sydney Theatre Company with your husband, Andrew Upton. That’s something you and Miuccia share—you both brought your husbands into your working lives.

Blanchett: Well, my husband brought me into his world. You both push each other, for better or worse.

Prada: I probably wouldn’t have done this job had I not met my husband. Everything has happened between us, but we’re still together, after more than 40 years!

Martin: Most people would think working with one’s husband would end a marriage. What’s the secret?

Prada: I have no idea. It’s mysterious.

Blanchett: For me, it’s having a common goal, even if you’re running at it from completely different directions.

Martin: So if your national culture didn’t particularly champion cinema, Cate, were films something you grew up perceiving as foreign?

Blanchett: Yes, growing up with just a few TV channels in the ’70s and ’80s, what one consumed on a Saturday afternoon were B-grade American films. My taste is really eclectic as a result. Bette Davis, Gregory Peck…and Anna Magnani and Giulietta Masina, when I eventually saw them, whom I absolutely loved. On the small screen, I worshipped Lucille Ball.

Prada: I started when I was a really small kid. My father brought us to the cinema to see Westerns. Soon enough, I was going all the time: three movies a day! My education was Antonioni, Godard, Buñuel…Now I probably watch a film a night, in bed. Alice Rohrwacher’s new one, Happy as Lazzaro, is very good. Alice can suspend time. Watching her films, you’re always torn between the delicacy of her humanity and the roughness of reality.

Blanchett: To be honest, some of the most profoundly formative experiences I’ve had were with dance—when I first watched butoh, it blew my mind.

Prada: One of the best weeks of my life was in Venice, where Pina Bausch was performing every day—it was incredible.

Martin: Do you think the fact that it was a female-led company made it resonate with you?

Prada: The power was in seeing the body used in a different way. Do you ever suffer from the feminine position, being a woman, Cate? It’s possibly because I come from a privileged position, but I never felt inferior to a man.

Blanchett: Sometimes, in England, I have a double sense of inferiority—I’m female and I’m Australian, from the colonies. But I rarely think about my gender until it’s pointed out to me, generally in interviews. The adjectives that are applied to me—I’m “forceful” or I “take no prisoners,” all because I express an opinion that I was asked for.

Martin: Often, the subtle, practical things are the most insidious. I was struck by what the director Agnès Varda said during the talk she gave in Venice a few summers ago to accompany her film for Miu Miu’s “Women’s Tales.” She explained that even though she was an accepted figure of 1960s cinema in France, and married to Jacques Demy, she couldn’t get cameramen and sound guys to carry out her instructions on set. To the extent that she had to set up her own production company.

Blanchett: From a positive perspective, having to create your own context really tests your need to do a project. It might take longer, but finding your own way in creates work that’s specific to that structure; it’s quintessentially yours.

Prada: Agnès is such an incredible woman. Cléo From 5 to 7 impressed me enormously in my youth. Her work has been, and is still now, so experimental. A good example is her latest, Faces Places. It is quite remarkable that she still has the energy, the spirit, and the need for such a project.

Martin: I gather that since Alejandro Iñárritu’s virtual reality piece, Carne y Arena, was shown at the Fondazione Prada last year, you plan to experiment more with VR and other alternative forms of cinema. Have you any dreams of directing?

Prada: No! But a fashion show is kind of a movie.

Martin: In which you are the director. How do you choose the directors for your “Women’s Tales” films, several of whom were photographed for this story—Ava DuVernay, Agnès Varda, Alice Rohrwacher—as well as people like Miranda July, Crystal Moselle, and Naomi Kawase?

Prada: I didn’t want the “Women’s Tales” to be purely commercial. Ava, for example, is an inspiration because she’s never afraid to stand up for what she believes in.

Martin: You’ve always been quite clear about keeping your art and fashion projects separate from one another.

Prada: In the beginning, I kept them separate because I wanted the respect of the art world. I’ll collaborate with anyone, but I draw the line at decorating a bag with someone else’s artwork.

Martin: What about the other way around? You made costumes for Baz Luhrmann’s The Great Gatsby, costumes for New York’s Metropolitan Opera.

Prada: Well, it’s rare that I’m asked, and, actually, costume design is a completely different job from fashion. There’s so much “You can’t do it like this.”

Martin: Cate, one of the most memorable costume moments has to be from the film Elizabeth, when a character is struggling to get out of a poisoned corset before it kills her. In fact, a good number of the awards for which you’ve been nominated are for playing real people: Bob Dylan, Katharine Hepburn, Veronica Guerin, as well as Elizabeth I.

Blanchett: Often, the audience thinks it takes more homework to play a real person, and, as they like to see how hard people have worked, they think it makes you more worthy of an award. I’m not interested in “the work” in terms of what it costs me personally. Art is not instructional, I think: It’s provocative. As such, my job is to be inconsistent, impolite, and disruptive.

Prada: Meanwhile, the media wants an explanation, a definition that will stay the same forever. At this moment, everything is being simplified—politics, life. But life is complicated; I am complicated, and my interests are varied—from the super cheap to the elevated. That’s why artists envy my job, or yours, because we do things quickly, and afterward we change.

Martin: Still, there are some underlying values that never change. They’re what make other women continue to look to you as role models.

Blanchett: There is a bottom line, yes. I have my own set of political beliefs, and hopefully a moral backbone. But when I was at university, thinking about what I wanted to do, I decided the only two things I wanted were to travel and to have the respect of my peers—whether that meant being an actor, an architect, or a gallerist.

Prada: As I get older, I do like to teach young girls about life, and I do have expectations of myself: What can I do that is clever, that is interesting, new, and fun? But other people’s expectations, I care less about. Your main obligation is to yourself. We are our own best competitors.

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Cate Blanchett looks all chic in Sydney as she runs errands in her Porsche convertible

She is praised by many as the Australian actress that has become one of the biggest Hollywood stars, as well as among the most bankable names in the tinseltown over the years. Cate Blanchett flaunted her love for sports cars recently when she was spotted driving a Porsche convertible, looking for a spot to go shopping in Sydney. The world-popular 49-year-old actress looked like the perfect picture of chic elegance as she was seen gently coming out of her luxury drive. Cate Blanchett was last seen in Ocean’s 8, the female version of Ocean’s 11 in which she played the female equivalent of Brad Pitt’s character. Her chemistry with Sandra Bullock in the movie is not to be missed!

A picture of elegance

Getting back to Cate Blanchett’s Sydney outing, she was seen sporting a concerned and serious expression as she hopped out of her silver Porsche. She was wearing a flowing bone coloured overcoat, over a plain white blouse, both of which beautifully covered her svelte frame. She combined that with a pair of three-quarter drawstring pants of the same tone, adding a casual cool air to the ensemble. The Oscar-winning actress completed her outfit with a pair of nude sneakers, with her short flaxen locks blowing away in the comforting Sydney breeze. Cate used a brown leather handbag and tortoise shell-frame sunglasses to accessorise.

Outing with the family

A reliable source revealed to Dailymail Australia that Cate Blanchett was out in Sydney with her husband Andrew Upton for a spot of shopping. Not too long ago both were also spotted indulging in a rare PDA. It was further revealed by the insider source that the couple donated a handful of used clothes to Red Cross, with Andrew coming very close to making the fatal error of giving away one of the actress’s designer handbags. Being the kind of in-demand actress that Cate Blanchett is, she has everything but free time on hand, something that was well evident in how she was constantly glued to her phone throughout the outing. She could be seen chatting happily with the mystery person on the other end (of the phone), waving in between to someone, believed to be her husband Andrew.

Guest appearance in ‘Documentary Now!’

Recently it was also announced that Cate Blanchett will make a guest star appearance as a Marina Abramovic-type of performance artist in a soon to be aired episode of ‘Documentary Now!.’ Titled appropriately as ‘Waiting for the Artist’ after the widely acclaimed documentary from 2012 – Marina Abramovic: The Artist is Present, Cate Blanchett’s character Barta will be seen reconciling her relationship with her former lover named Dimo Van Omen (played by Fred Armisen), who is known to be a provocateur of the art world. This episode was shot at a location in Budapest, Hungary few months ago. As everyone might be aware, IFC with ‘Documentary Now!’ is all set for two Emmy nominations and scoring an excellent second quarter growth. That they are going to have an Oscar-winning actress in an episode is only going to increase their popularity even more!