New Cate Blanchett interviews & TÁR preview in London on New Year’s Eve
Posted on
Nov 23, 2022

New Cate Blanchett interviews & TÁR preview in London on New Year’s Eve

Ciao, Blanchett fans!

Cate Blanchett has been nominated for Best Lead Performance at the Independent Spirit Awards. TÁR received a total of 7 nominations. Another interview with Cate and Nina Hoss has been released, and The Late Show with Stephen Colbert aired their recent episode where Cate took The Colbert Questionert. There will be preview screenings of TÁR at Picturehouse cinemas in London on New Year’s Eve, you can book tickets here. The movie will be released in the UK on January 13th 2023.

We have added the scans from Financial Times: How to Spend It on our gallery. The January 2023 issue of Empire UK magazine is out now. Cate and Todd Field were interviewed by Olly Richards, and photographed by Mary McCartney during the recording of TÁR’s concept album.


Financial Times: How to Spend It – November 19th 2022

Empire Magazine Interview

Here are some parts of the interview with Cate by Olly Richards.

If you’re ever having a nice chat with Cate Blanchett and want to stop it dead in its tracks, ask her about acting.

It’s like throwing a bucket of water over her. “I couldn’t be less interested in talking about it,” she says, slowly folding her arms as if this might deflect the question. She would rather talk about anything else. She’d like to talk about her garden (her onions are doing well). She’d like to talk about how amazing it is that we’re standing about 15 metres from where The Beatles recorded (we’re in Abbey Road Studios, which we’ll explain later). Just please, oh God, not acting. Unfortunately, we’re going to make her talk about it because, you may have noticed, she’s really very good at it. And in her new film she’s about the best at it she’s ever been.

The list of great Cate Blanchett performances is not short. It’s pretty much a list of all Cate Blanchett’s performances. After 1997’s Oscar and Lucinda she was talked of as a talent to watch. The next year she played Elizabeth I and showed she was a talent you couldn’t tear your eyes from. So it’s been ever since, The Aviator, Notes on A Scandal, Blue Jasmine, Carol. You might find some duff films on her CV, but you won’t find a duff performance.

TÁR, though, sees Blanchett operating on a different level. She’s ripping through layers of a complicated, troubled woman in a way that leaves you wrung out just spectating. It’s like watching Whitney Houston sing or Gene Kelly dance. You know they’re made of approximately all the same bits as you, but it’s impossible to fathom how they’ve been able to put them to much more remarkable use. At 53, Blanchett is doing the most astonishing work of her career.

The reason we’re at Abbey Road is because Field and Blanchett are, in a very meta move, making a concept album inspired by Tár’s planned Mahler album. Blanchett is readying to conduct the Dresden Philharmonic (the orchestra in the film), who will arrive tomorrow. Their chairs are set up, expectantly awaiting orchestral bottoms. “It’s all in the breath,” says Blanchett, waving her hand gently in the air. “If you stop breathing, you break the communication with the orchestra, You stop thinking when you stop breathing.”

She will talk about conducting for as long as you like. She spent months studying it — the right hand keeps tempo; the left instructs the orchestra — as well as learning to play the piano so well that she could interpret Bach piece in multiple ways. She likes to talk about the brilliant people who taught her things, but resist any talk of her own skills. We try to take her back to the first note of her performance. As it turns out, becoming Lydia Tár began as all Blanchett’s favorite roles do: with absolute terror and confusion.

Back in 2012, Field was writing a political thriller with Joan Didion. It fell through but not before he’d spoken to Blanchett about playing the lead. She lurked at the edges of his mind for years, until in 2020 he began writing TÁR. The character kept assuming a familiar face. “I didn’t tell anyone. I didn’t tell the studio. They thought I was writing this about a man. I thought, ‘How do I want to tell this story?’ And I thought it had to be a woman… it’s Cate.”

He was terrified about actually asking, but sent her the script, which he never does before meeting an actor. When Blanchett received it, she was just as frightened. She had no idea what she was expected to do with this woman.

“It was mind-blowing,” says Blanchett. “Because I didn’t know what it was. That, for me, is the most exciting and dangerous way to start a project. Often when you read something you can admire it, but if you know exactly what it is, then you should hand it over to someone else, because it’s already made in your head. I had no idea how to approach this.”

Blanchett never really stops preparing. She has an iPad full of bits of characters; pages of notes, links and clips that make sense only to her but might one day become a fragment of a character’s life. They might not have been assigned to a particular character when she saves them. “You never know where the key to a character lies,” she says. “Sometimes its in a conversation, in a piece of music you listen to, or a gesture someone did.” She laughs as she remembers one of the references for TÁR.

That iPad is a place for new characters to gestate, but also a sort of crypt for the ones who never made it. She can’t bring herself to delete them. She recently found a file she’d made for Lady Marchmain in Brideshead Revisited, which she was going to make with Luca Guadagnino. “I thought, ‘I should delete this, because it’s not going to happen now.” But I was reading it on a train and I thought, ‘There are interesting thoughts. Who knows what they’re going to become?'”

Blanchett loves to have her own ideas confronted. “To be in agreement all the time, to be in a room where everyone thinks the same way or speaks the same way, I’ll run a mile. I think that’s what’s wrong with democracy at the moment. We’ve lost that robust townhall debate.” She brings it all back neatly to music and conducting. “You can only hear harmony if you’ve heard discord,” she says. “You’ve got to tune the instrument.”

Blanchett has been tuning her instrument for over 25 years now. In the quarter of a century since her first movie, Paradise Road, she’s racked up 60 film acting credits, not including short films or television. That’s a lot. Tom Cruise only has 47 and he’s been going 16 years longer. Julia Roberts has 52. Famously prolific Nicole Kidman has 68, with a 14-year head start. Blanchett gasps when we tell her the number. “Terrible!” Well, it definitely isn’t terrible, but it does suggest someone who needs to work. “I do find it hard to say no,” she says. “Some things I should have said no to.” She never really lets herself stop working and isn’t sure what she’d do if she did. “I need to develop some hobbies,” she says. “But I suppose work is my hobby. Or it’s a compulsion.”

“I reserve the right to walk away,” she says with mock imperiousness. “Everyone has a different relationship with work, but I do need to be seduced back into it.” So it’s not that she has a compulsion to work for the sake of work, but that she keeps getting seduced. And she likes to be seduced rather than the seducer. She still has a big list of directors she wants to work with — Ari Aster, Jane Campion, Park Chan-wook, Kelly Reichardt — but she hasn’t let them know. “I’m quite shy,” she says. The only one she’s not shy with is Scorsese, who directed her in The Aviator. “Every time I see him I say, ‘Come on. I’m not getting any younger. When are you going to make a film with a fucking woman at the centre?'” She says it so fiercely, you have to assume Scorsese is somewhere writing in a panic right now.

You can read the full interview on the scans below and you can purchase the magazine here.

Cate Blanchett to receive Santa Barbara Film Fest’ Outstanding Performer of the Year Award
Posted on
Nov 8, 2022

Cate Blanchett to receive Santa Barbara Film Fest’ Outstanding Performer of the Year Award

Hi, Cate Blanchett fans!

Cate is receiving another award for her performance as Lydia Tár. Santa Barbara Film Festival is honoring her with Outstanding Performer of the Year Award for the second time — she is the first two-time recipient of the award.

Cate has already won the Volpi Cup for Best Actress from Venice Film Festival, and was honored with Silver Medallion by Telluride Film Festival last September.

Cate Blanchett, the revered Australian actress who has two Oscars to her name, has been tapped by the Santa Barbara International Film Festival to receive its Outstanding Performer of the Year Award in recognition of her critically acclaimed portrayal of a symphony orchestra conductor in Todd Field‘s film Tár.

Blanchett will be presented with the honor following a career-retrospective conversation — moderated by yours truly — at Santa Barbara’s historic Arlington Theatre on the evening of Friday, Feb. 10, 2023, as part of the fest’s 38th edition, which will run from Feb. 8-13.

The 53-year-old will become the first person to receive SBIFF’s Outstanding Performer of the Year Award twice, having previously been presented it in 2014 in recognition of her performance in 2013’s Blue Jasmine. In 2008, the year after her performances in both Elizabeth: The Golden Age and I’m Not There, she was feted with the fest’s Modern Master Award.

SBIFF executive director Roger Durling said in a statement, “Cate Blanchett is an artist who has nothing left to prove; she is one of the most brilliant actresses ever – yet she keeps challenging herself and proving over and over again that she’s the most outstanding performer!”

Source: THR

Cate Blanchett Gotham Awards Nomination; & International Piano Magazine Interview
Posted on
Oct 26, 2022

Cate Blanchett Gotham Awards Nomination; & International Piano Magazine Interview

Great day, everyone!

Cate Blanchett has been nominated for Outstanding Leading Performance for her role as Lydia Tár at 2022 2022 Gotham Awards. TÁR has been nominated in an total of five categories: Best Feature Film, Best Screenplay for Todd Field, and Best Supporting Performance for both Nina Hoss and Noémie Merlant. The movie will have wide release in the US this Friday.

The latest issue of International Piano magazine is out now and you can read the interview with Cate.

Two Hairdressers in Bagglyport airs on IFC tonight and is now available to stream on AMC+.

International Piano Magazine

Documentary Now!

 

 

Cate Blanchett wins her second Volpi Cup Award for Best Actress
Posted on
Sep 14, 2022

Cate Blanchett wins her second Volpi Cup Award for Best Actress

Hi, everyone!

Cate Blanchett is now a two-time Volpi Cup Best Actress winner. She previously won the award for her role as Jude Quinn in Todd Haynes’ I’m Not There, and last Saturday (September 10th) she has been the awarded the Volpi Cup for the second time for her role as Lydia Tár in Todd Field’s TÁR where she has been receiving critical acclaim. She is the fourth actress to win the award twice — joining Shirley MacLaine, Isabelle Huppert, and Valeria Golino.

Cate Blanchett with her Volpi Cup Award photographed by Greg Williams

Closing Ceremony

Red carpet arrival 28:45; Volpi Cup for Best Actress Award 2:03:35

Red Carpet
Closing Ceremony
Winners Photocall

Press Conference Winners

Main Competition winners 38:35

Winners Press Con
Photographed by Greg Williams

 

 

49th Telluride Film Festival A Tribute to Cate Blanchett
Posted on
Sep 5, 2022

49th Telluride Film Festival A Tribute to Cate Blanchett

Happy Monday, everyone!

TÁR has screened in Telluride, Colorado over the weekend and was well-received by the American critics. Coinciding with the US premiere is the tribute to Cate Blanchett and Q&A with her, Nina Hoss, and director Todd Field. While in Telluride, Cate also watched Alejandro G. Iñarritu’s new movie, Bardo.

Cate Blanchett: ‘TÁR’ Shows How ‘Legacy Will Be the Death of Your Artistry’

On Saturday night, after all 157 minutes of “TÁR” played, and a 20-minute highlight reel of her work was shown, the Telluride Film Festival finally brought out Cate Blanchett for a tribute that included awarding her the Silver Medallion, and having an onstage chat with her about the new film in front of an audience that included Anne Hathaway, Jeremy Strong, James Gray, Karyn Kusama, Rooney Mara, Frances McDormand and the rest of Women Talking cast, Paul Mescal, and Phoebe Bridgers.

It was almost fitting to have “TÁR” as the focus of a tribute to Blanchett, given how the film sees her playing a highly accomplished conductor whose world starts to unravel, and actually includes an early scene where her character is also interviewed onstage, having to reflect on her body of work.

What Blanchett herself began to focus on was giving attendees an idea of what happens with performers behind the curtain. “The conductor’s that I spoke to and observed, talked about [an] extreme sense of nerves, and I know that inherently, from having years and years and years working on stage, is that I stand on stage, as I did before I came on here, the worst role you could possibly play is yourself,” said the actress. “I would much rather play Hedda Gabler. That is much easier than playing Cate Blanchett, whoever that is.”

Blanchett called “TÁR,” filmmaker Todd Field’s first release in 16 years, a process film. “I think it’s interesting. You don’t see the performance, you see the process of making something. And that process is indelicate and impolite and full of doubt. And I think that that’s the state that [Lydia Tár] is in personally, as well as professionally.”

She added “the thing that the audience doesn’t see, they think of performers as being supremely confident channels. And performers are riddled with doubt. And that the supreme act of bravery, is coming out and channeling the things through them, not for themselves, but for you guys.” While the enlightening sentiment moved Hathaway to tears, according to a couple of onlookers, Blanchett could not help but add a tag, using a jokingly vulnerable voice to say, “We’re doing it for you guys, it’s all for you.”

Speaking more on “TÁR,” Blanchett shared that she was immediately impressed with how Field’s script depicts an artist in preparation, saying “it was one of the most assured, clear, don’t-need-to-change-a-syllable screenplays that I have ever read in my life,” she also found his directing approach to be a pleasant surprise. “You couldn’t have hoped for a better collaborator than Todd,” said Blanchett. “Even though he’d written the screenplay, I’d say, ‘Wait, hang on, you said this needs to happen, too.’” His response to her would be, “Oh don’t worry about that, the writer wrote that. Don’t worry about it.”

Their collaboration was a long time coming, with Blanchett having been in talks to star in the film Field had been working on with Joan Didion in 2012. “It takes a great deal to get Todd Field to leave his barn to come out and make another movie,” said the actress. “And I think we’re all very grateful that he has done so. But he doesn’t do so unless he has something to say. And he has so much to say in this script.”

One of those things is a statement about legacy, something Lydia Tár is obsessed with. “As an artist, when you get to the top of Mount Olympus, if you’re a genuine artist, you have to blow it all up. Because legacy will be the death of your artistry,” said Blanchett. “So in the end, that’s what I found really noble about the character. But unfortunately, by blowing that up, there’s a lot of casualties. I think that’s the complicated thing about it.”

Cate Blanchett Earns Her First Award (of Surely Many) for TÁR

TÁR, which landed at Telluride after glowing reviews in Venice, sees Blanchett deliver a bombastic performance as the head conductor of the Berlin Philharmonic, who has reached the highest pinnacle of success in her field. ??”She’d made a commitment to herself very, very early on that she would transform herself into something great,” Blanchett said of the character during the Q&A after the screening. “And then what you see in the film is the fact that she’s on that pinnacle, and the only next steps you can possibly make is down — and in artistic life, that is the greatest step you can possibly make.”

In the beginning of the film, the audience is let in on the many habits in Lydia’s life, from her tailored suits and ultra-chic Berlin home to her obsessive handwashing and her intense pre-performance rituals. Blanchett said that she was able to embody Lydia’s flaws because she relates to the anxiety that every performer faces before stepping out onto a stage. “I think that’s the thing that the audience doesn’t see — they think about performers as being supremely confident,” she said. “Performers are riddled with doubt, and the supreme act is coming out and channeling the thing through them, not for themselves, but for you guys.”

Blanchett elaborated more on the way that every performance is a risk, a feeling she’s had in her own work, especially when she’s performed in plays. “Sometimes it may not lift off, but that’s the exciting, dangerous thing,” she said. “And I think that’s the thing that people forget is there’s not some certainty that we know how to do this. Every single time you go on set, every single time you step on stage, every time you step on the podium in front of an orchestra—it may be okay, but it may not be the best they can do.”

And for the extremely small number of major female conductors, there are even more challenges. As Blanchett, who spoke to numerous female conductors in preparation for the role, pointed out: “When they step on the podium, 70% is a political act and they have to spend 70% of their energy pushing aside the fact that they’re female, simply so they can be musicians.”

The further you get into TÁR, the more you begin to realize that all is not well in the life that Lydia has built, and that her past misdeeds may be about to make her life unravel. In the era of #MeToo, Field is using this story to at least in part explore those abuses of power. “Artists are complicated people – they live in the gray areas,” said Blanchett. “And I think these are all the questions that the film asks: in the pursuit of greatness, what do we condone and who supports those things that might destabilize other people?”

Review: Cate Blanchett delivers a Telluride ‘Tár’ de force

When Cate Blanchett took the stage Saturday evening for her Telluride Film Festival tribute, right after a screening of her astonishing new movie, “Tár,” the audience must have enjoyed a bit of a chuckle. Most audiences that get a post-screening Q&A with Blanchett — and there will probably be a few in the months to come — will find themselves in a similar position. In “Tár,” Blanchett plays a world-renowned classical conductor named Lydia Tár, and one of her first scenes is a long, riveting and revealing conversation with the New Yorker writer Adam Gopnik (playing himself), held in front of a live audience.

It’s an instantly captivating sequence, fearless in its musical and intellectual rigor, that hard-wires us into the workings of Lydia’s formidable mind. We drink in her black-suited elegance and sense her initial guardedness, though any anxiety soon melts way as Lydia, as assured a speaker as she is a conductor, begins holding forth about her art, her love for Mahler and Bernstein, and her experiences studying, playing and conducting music all over the world. Her synapses fire like mad and her hands spring to inventive life as she describes her role in not just keeping but creating time, molding and sculpting it with a level of imagination that the audience will detect only as a sublime piece of music.

“Tár,” the third and finest feature directed by Todd Field (“In the Bedroom,” “Little Children”), keeps its own time beautifully. The movie runs a mesmerizing two hours and 38 minutes; I didn’t want it to end. It’s the story of a magnificent monster and her very public downfall, but what makes that downfall so persuasive is that it happens so gradually, and springs forth from some such quietly intimate roots. The story proceeds in carefully orchestrated movements, as it were, and each one of those movements draws us a little deeper into Lydia’s highly influential and rigidly hierarchical corner of the music world.

This is Field’s first movie in 16 years (and his first original screenplay, after two adaptations), and he unleashes what feels like close to a decade’s worth of pent-up, razor-sharp observations about the politics of the art world, the tensions of academia, the debate over cancel culture, the reckonings of #MeToo and, on a not-unrelated note, the ascendancy of women in creative and professional spaces long dominated by white men. And in this space, Lydia refuses — arrogantly, maddeningly and sometimes heroically — to bow to what she sees as prevailing liberal orthodoxies. Hailed as the first woman to conduct one of the world’s great orchestras, she nonetheless dismisses gender inequality as a significant deterrent to her success.

To play Lydia, Blanchett learned to speak German, play the piano and conduct music, but the brilliance of her work goes beyond the conventions of study, practice and research. It takes an actor who can seem, as Blanchett does, like both a gifted orchestrator and a finely tuned instrument in the same instance.

Full review on LA Times

49th Telluride Film Festival – Class Photo
49th Telluride Film Festival – A Tribute to Cate Blanchett

Tribute

Telluride Film Festival Day 3 – Tribute and Q&A

Sources: Indiewire, Vanity Fair

First Look at Cate Blanchett at Telluride Film Festival
Posted on
Sep 3, 2022

First Look at Cate Blanchett at Telluride Film Festival

Hi, everyone!

Cate Blanchett is now at Telluride, Colorado for the US premiere of TÁR and tribute from Telluride Film Festival. She is with Nina Hoss, who plays Sharon Goodnow, her partner in the movie, and director Todd Field. They took the traditional festival class photo with all the filmmakers who have films on the festival’s lineup.

TÁR, which stars Cate Blanchett as a high-profile orchestra conductor, will get an additional spotlight when Blanchett receives a tribute at the festival. “We could have tributed her a thousand times over from Elizabeth on, and the timing has not worked out ever, but in a way I’m kind of glad that this is the one because, to me, this is her best performance ever,” Julie Huntsinger (Telluride Film Festival executive director) says.

49th Telluride Film Festival – Class Photo
Source: Vanity Fair

A Tribute to Cate Blanchett and TÁR’s North American Premiere at 49th Telluride Film Festival
Posted on
Sep 2, 2022

A Tribute to Cate Blanchett and TÁR’s North American Premiere at 49th Telluride Film Festival

Hi, everyone!

After the world premiere of TÁR in Venice, Cate Blanchett is Telluride-bound this time as Telluride Film Festival will be paying tribute to her — she will be presented with the Silver Medallion right after the North American premiere of TÁR. The tribute will be held tomorrow, September 3rd (6:30pm MT). The following day, September 4th, there will be Q&A with Cate, Nina Hoss, and Todd Field after the 3:30pm MT screening.

It’s not easy (or always advisable) to try to explain the difference between a movie star and an actor. But as we gather to consider and celebrate Cate Blanchett’s singular achievements, what follows might help.

Movie stars tend to play iterations of themselves with slightly different wardrobe. Their bold-faced names can be as marketable as the films in which they appear. Movie stars are brands, and rarely stray from the familiar. Audiences are likely to remember their action stunts as much as their performances.

Actors, as Blanchett’s body of work attests, abhor repetition. They’d rather disappear into a part than appear on a billboard. Actors are thrilled by risk and embrace, rather than avoid, difficult and problematic characters.

Blanchett played the self-absorbed role of morning TV host Brie Evantee in DON’T LOOK UP (2021) and as Phyllis Schlaflyin the miniseries MRS. AMERICA (2021); she also played a version of herself and her cousin in COFFEE AND CIGARETTES (2003). Actors deliberately partner with distinctive storytellers, not franchise custodians. And when it comes to stunts, their cinematic feats involve leaping into a role, not out of an airplane.

Blanchett now might be as recognizable as most movie stars, but she’s always been—and continues to be—an actor first (she prefers it over actress). As befitting her talent, she has worked with some of the most celebrated directors: Martin Scorsese, Steven Spielberg, PeterJackson, Ridley Scott and David Fincher among them. She has won two Oscars, for THE AVIATOR (2004) and BLUE JASMINE (2013).

Yet Blanchett’s career and her artistic inclinations are perhaps better defined by the lesser-known yet nonetheless distinctive filmmakers with whom she has collaborated, often more than once: Terrence Malick (KNIGHT OF CUPS, 2015; VOYAGE OF TIME: LIFE’S JOURNEY, 2016; SONG TO SONG, 2017), Todd Haynes (I’M NOT THERE, 2002; CAROL, 2015) and Gillian Armstrong (OSCAR AND LUCINDA, 1997; CHARLOTTE GRAY, 2001).

Now, in what seems like a match made in cinematic heaven, Blanchett stars in TÁR, the first movie in 16 years from writer-director-actor Todd Field (LITTLE CHILDREN, 2006). In the film, Blanchett plays Lydia Tár, a world-renowned conductor and composer whose rise to the top was due to her fierce, uncompromising drive. Blanchett’s fearlessness is hardly limited to her acting choices. When Blanchett headed the Cannes Film Festival jury four years ago, she led a protest targeting Cannes’ constant dearth of female filmmakers. “The stairs of our industry must be accessible to all,” Blanchett said at the time. “Let’s climb.” We are right behind you.

–John Horn

Source: Telluride Film Festival

TÁR Premiere on September 1st #Venezia79
Posted on
Aug 16, 2022

TÁR Premiere on September 1st #Venezia79

Ciao!

Biennale Cinema has released the full schedule for this year’s film festival. TÁR will have two public screenings on September 1st — at 17:15 (Sala Grande), which marks its world premiere, and 19:00 (Palabiennale). Earliest screening is on August 31st for press and industry members only. The ticket will go on sale at 15:00 (Venice time), August 17th. You can go here to book tickets and you can check the screening schedule below.

The movie is also competing for Queer Lion’s 16th Edition. The Queer Lion Award was created as a collateral prize for the “Best Film with Homosexual & Queer Culture Contents”. Here’s an updated synopsis of the movie:

Lydia Tár is an acclaimed composer who rose to become the first female chief conductor of a German orchestra. We follow Tár during her daily life living in Berlin, leading up to the recording of her latest symphony, while her sentimental life (including a complicated tormented affair with a female cellist) clashes with and threatens her burning ambitions. Tár’s adopted daughter, the exeptionally brilliant six-year-old Petra, will turn out to be the rock Lydia needs, when everything in her life seems to start going wrong.

Screening Schedule

Public Screening

 

Press-Industry Screening

UK/Australia Season

Cate has sent another short message as ambassador of UK/AU Season.

 

Source: Biennale Cinema, Queer Lion

 

Saturn Awards Nominations
Posted on
Aug 12, 2022

Saturn Awards Nominations

Hi, everyone!

Cate has been nominated at Saturn Awards for her performance in Nightmare Alley. The movie itself garnered 10 nominations: Thriller Film, Actress, Supporting Actor, Direction, Writing, Music, Editing, Production Design, Costume, and Make-up.

The Saturn Awards have unveiled nominations for their 50th anniversary edition, with organizer the Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy & Horror Films saying that the ceremony to reveal winners is set for October 25 in an event that will be livestreamed on ElectricNOW.

Actress in a Film

• Cate Blanchett, Nightmare Alley (Searchlight Pictures)

• Emily Blunt, A Quiet Place Part II (Paramount Pictures)

• Zoe Kravitz, The Batman (Warner Bros. Pictures)

• Keke Palmer, Nope (Universal Pictures)

• Emma Stone, Cruella (Walt Disney Studios)

• Michelle Yeoh, Everything Everywhere All at Once (A24)

• Zendaya, Spider-Man: No Way Home (Sony Pictures / Marvel)

Source: Deadline

First look at TÁR and Borderlands shown at CinemaCon
Posted on
Apr 29, 2022

First look at TÁR and Borderlands shown at CinemaCon

Happy Friday, everyone!

Attendees of CinemaCon 2022 in Las Vegas were treated to a first look at TÁR and Borderlands which will be both released this year. There is also an additional article with interview with Cate from The Hollywood Reporter for Chaplin  Awards.

TÁR Reaction

First footage of TÁR was specifically created to be shown at the event on Wednesday (April 27th). The movie is on the upcoming slate of Focus Features and is schedule to be released on October 7th 2022.

Cate Blanchett Smokes The Competition As A World-Famous Conductor

According to Deadline, the film will follow Blanchett’s Lydia Tár, a (fictional) renowned and groundbreaking conductor who becomes the first woman to lead a major German orchestra. “Joker” composer Hildur Guðnadóttir will score the picture, while Field is writing and producing in addition to directing. Nina Hoss, Noémie Merlant, Julian Glover, Mark Strong, Allan Corduner, Sylvia Flote, and cellist and Royal Academy of Music alum Sophie Kauer are among the announced cast.

The film is in post-production, but CinemaCon audiences were treated to an exclusive first look at the footage so far.

The footage shown at CinemaCon was brief, albeit striking. A woman (Cate Blanchett with her face obscured) stands against a black background, slowly opening her mouth to let smoke pour out. I know, I know, smoking is bad, but Blanchett makes it look like the coolest, sexiest thing in the world. The shot is presented with a narration discussing how the pandemic has had a massive impact on our culture and belief systems.

“But there are other plagues,” the narrator says.

The narration continues, talking about nature, but the camera remains on this single shot of smoke leaving her lips, and pulsating into a strange form that continues obscuring her face. The narration takes a turn for the intense, and says that you must “stand in front of God and obliterate yourself.” Finally, the camera cuts to a different image, one of a woman conducting the orchestra. Lydia Tár may not be a real person, but whomever this woman is that Blanchett is bringing to life, seems like an absolute badass.

Official plot details about “TÁR” are scarce, but Focus Features says it’s “set in the world of classical music, starring the incomparable Cate Blanchett.”

Focus Features shows the new Todd Field movie at CinemaCon

Audiences got a look at TÁR, the first film from Todd Field (Little Children) in 16 years. Not much is known about the film just yet, only that it takes place in the world of classical music and stars Cate Blanchett. That should be enough. The footage shown at CinemaCon was created exclusively for the event and consisted of Blanchett exhaling smoke in slow motion while a monologue about the nature of power played underneath. 

Borderlands Reaction

On the last day of CinemaCon 2022, Lionsgate has presented their 2022 slate which includes Borderlands starring Cate Blanchett, Kevin Hart, Jamie Lee Curtis, Jack Black, Ariana Greenblatt and Florian Montaneau. There is no release date for the yet. Based on the reports from the attendees, a clip for Borderlands that run for one minute was shown during Lionsgate sizzle reel.

IGN Southeast Asia — The first look at the Borderlands movie was revealed at CinemaCon 2022, and it looks to be a faithful adaptation of the beloved video game franchise. While we only saw about a minute of footage, it was immediately clear that this film is set in the Borderlands universe. From the artstyle to hearing Jack Black as Claptrap to seeing Cate Blanchett as Lilith, Jamie Lee Curtis as Dr. Patricia Tannis, and Kevin Hart as Roland, all the familiar beats from Borderlands are being hit, albeit with a bit of Hollywood starpower being thrown in.

The Hollywood Reporter — The first footage for Borderlands has arrived — and just like the immensely popular video game series, it was spectacular.

The highly-anticipated film, based on the blockbuster gaming series developed by Gearbox Software and published by 2K, got a sneak peek Thursday during the Lionsgate panel at CinemaCon.

Lionsgate showed approximately a minute of electric footage that showcased Oscar-winner Cate Blanchett as she’s never been seen before, in a fire-engine-red wig, toting a gun and fighting her way through a vibrantly colored cityscape. Kevin Hart also appeared as did Jack Black voicing the robot Claptrap that unexpectedly takes a bullet from Blanchett’s gun with a punchline to follow.

SlashFilm — The “Borderlands” footage came as part of a sizzle reel from Lionsgate, which also showcased footage from “The Hunger Games” prequel “The Ballad of Songbirds and Snakes” and the upcoming “Dirty Dancing” sequel. In the footage, we see Cate Blanchett as Lilith in a killer bright red wig, which seems worth the price of admission alone. Kevin Hart’s character Roland says, “Nothing better than a little wham, bam, thank you, man.” There’s a robot (fans of the games will recognize as Claptrap) voiced by Jack Black, who says, “Whoopsie, you accidentally shot me in the face again.”

And that’s about all there was to see! It isn’t much, just enough to give a little tease of the upcoming “Borderlands” movie, which looks like it will maintain the humorous tone of the game.

JoBlo — A small amount of footage from the live-action adaptation of Borderlands was also teased, with Bumbray saying that the colour scheme looks insane. Cate Blanchett stars as Lilith, an infamous treasure hunter with a mysterious past who reluctantly returns to her home planet to find the missing daughter of the universe’s most powerful S.O.B. The footage showcased Blanchett fighting across a cityscape, gun in hand, with Kevin Hart also appearing as Roland and Jack Black voicing Claptrap.

Cate Blanchett “Completely and Utterly Overwhelmed” by Chaplin Award Honor

On Monday night Cate Blanchett became the second-youngest recipient of Film at Lincoln Center’s Chaplin Award. And though Blanchett is a two-time Oscar winner and has worked with Scorsese, Steven Spielberg, Guillermo del Toro and Wes Anderson, among other luminaries, she was “completely and utterly overwhelmed,” she told The Hollywood Reporter, to have received this year’s honor.

“I don’t even know how to express it because you look at the look of previous honorees, and they’re so eclectic, but to a woman, they’re all of them are people who’ve had a deep influence on the American cultural landscape and on filmmaking at large internationally,” she added. “They’re people who I have individually revered, but collectively it’s like entering some sort of strange pantheon.”

She continued, laughing, “Hopefully, I can make it out of the building without them taking the award away from me.”

The honor is Film at Lincoln Center’s second Chaplin Award to be presented in the past 12 months, with Spike Lee receiving his honor in a delayed ceremony that took place in September.

Yet Monday night’s proceedings weren’t totally unaffected by the COVID-19 pandemic. It was announced at the top of the gala that director Todd Haynes, who was set to conduct a Q&A with Blanchett, would not be there since he had tested positive for COVID that morning. Then, the audience was told, presenter Bradley Cooper, who recently starred with Blanchett in Nightmare Alley, was also “not feeling well.” These two announcements, greeted with groans from the audience, were quickly followed by Blanchett shouting from the audience, “I’m here,” which prompted cheers.

The evening featured tributes from Scorsese, Richard Linklater, Hugh Jackman and producer Christine Vachon, who presented Blanchett with her award and shared with the audience that Haynes, though “devastated” not to be there, was apparently still feeling well enough to be frequently texting her throughout the event, wondering what they were doing. Film Comment co-deputy editor Devika Girish filled in for Haynes.

Prior to the gala, Film at Lincoln Center president Lesli Klainberg shared that despite Blanchett perhaps not being old enough for a lifetime achievement award, she had amassed enough impressive, diverse work over her nearly 30 years in the industry to make her worthy of this honor.

“I think Cate really embodies a really extraordinary artist of this time who has worked in independent films; she has worked on studio films; she works on blockbuster studio films,” Klainberg told THR. “The extraordinary variety of directors that she’s worked with, it’s just amazing to think about how many of the finest directors of our time she has been able to work with and all of her projects — we felt that she was also a person who was so active still, still working—this is not intended as an end of your career award.”

As for what’s next for her, Blanchett said she doesn’t have a particular type of project she hasn’t done that she wants to do, but she looks forward to getting a “strange ask.”

“I always think that the job I just finished is my last, and I will finally go and grow orchids in my greenhouse,” she said of her career plans. “I guess if I look back, it’s that I’ve always gravitated towards the strange ask or the ask that’s just an antidote to what I’ve done in some way. It’s an undeniable ask, and the directors I’ve worked with have usually made those asks of me. Not necessarily that I’ve achieved what I’ve wanted to achieve through that role or that production or that they have either, but the ask has been really undeniable.”

Sources: SlashFilm-TAR, JoBlo-TAR, THR-Borderlands, IGN, SlashFilm-Borderlands, JoBlo-Borderlands, THR