Happy Birthday, Cate Blanchett! – Mass Update 2022
Posted on
May 14, 2022

Happy Birthday, Cate Blanchett! – Mass Update 2022

Today is the day! HAPPY BIRTHDAY, CATE BLANCHETT! We wish that she have a healthy life and continuous success in her career.

In our own little way of celebrating Cate’s birthday, it has been a tradition of the Cate Blanchett Fan team to have a mass gallery update, which aims to make as many photos as possible available to everyone. We have updated some low quality to middle/high quality photos and uploaded additional photos from events, movies, photoshoots, magazine scans.

This fansite is run for free by Cate fans but every year we also have to renew the host in order to keep the site open. This costs US$300 and the deadline is in August this year. We hope that you can support the site by donating — any amount is deeply appreciated. You can click on the donate button below or on the left side bar (when viewed on desktop).

Enjoy the update!

           Donate button

   or by using       the QR code

Greg Williams has shared the colored version of some photos taking during 2022 Screen Actors Guild Awards. Nicola Clarke, who is Cate’s hair stylist and friend also shared a video with some never before seen photos towards the end of the video.

Additional photos from Chaplin Awards and Articles
Posted on
Apr 28, 2022

Additional photos from Chaplin Awards and Articles

Hi, blanchetters!

We have added some photos from Chaplin Awards and there are articles released the past few days since the gala.

Cate Blanchett Honored by Film at Lincoln Center

It took Film at Lincoln Center (née Film Society of Lincoln Center) 47 years to get around to honoring “the Meryl Streep from Down Under,” Australia’s own chameleon-in residence, Cate Blanchett. To give you an idea of her range: not only is she able to get away with impersonating Bob Dylan and Katharine Hepburn, she gets Oscar-nominated and even an Oscar for the effort.

The Chaplin Award (named for its first recipient back in 1972) used to come with a phalanx of the honoree’s name-brand co-stars, who’d introduce a group of film clips they appeared in, then retire to glitter up the after-party. Times have changed, and the celebrity count is way down.

Todd Haynes, who directed the actress to two Academy Award shots (Carol and I’m Not There, the movie that saw Blanchett’s turn as Dylan), was to lead “A Conversation with Cate Blanchett” on stage, but tested positive the day of and had to cancel. Strike Two: Guest Speaker Bradley Cooper, her Nightmare Alley co-star, likewise was “not feeling well and unable to attend the festivities.”

It fell (upward) to Daniel H. Stern, President of Film at Lincoln Center, to bring this brimming bad news to the Alice Tully Hall crowd. They, of course, responded en masse with a primal moan.

“I’m here!” trilled a statuesque celeb in the orchestra section. It was the evening’s honoree, and the moans turned immediately and memorably into roars of delight. She proved quite enough.

Blanchett was not entirely abandoned on her big night. Several of her directors sent filmed testaments to her considerable worth. Austin filmmaker Richard Linklater, who guided her through Where’d You Go, Bernadette, took it upon himself to do The Big Reveal: that she’s half-Texan, half-Australian. Her dad was a US Navy officer who settled in Australia after World War II.

Martin Scorsese admitted he didn’t just love making a movie with Blanchett, he felt a bit blessed by the experience. (His movie was the Howard Hughes bio The Aviator and Cate was Kate—Hepburn.) “The role called for her to do something that I think is extraordinarily difficult, which was to take a very famous and extremely recognizable person and bring her to life as a character in our film,” he said. “I found out that this was exactly the kind of challenge Cate was up for, and to watch her taking it on was really a learning experience. Did you ever see an actor who is so brave and so daring on the one hand and at the same time so confident in her ability to meet that problem head on?”

Fellow Aussies Hugh Jackman and wife Deborra-Lee Furness chimed in with cheery sentiments. “We were at drama school around the same time, and everyone was talking about Cate Blanchett,” he remembered. “You were, for us, the north star—your courage, your range of the work that you do, your commitment to theater and to your community. You are extraordinary.”

Such testimonials served as punctuation for the film clips that illustrated the depth and range of Blanchett’s performances. After the clips had run their course, the evening went into the chat portion of the program. Co-deputy editor of FALC’s Film Comment Devika Girish, having chalked up an earlier podcast with Blanchett, took on the interview duties that Haynes was to do.

The blast of Blanchett Concentrate in the film clips left the actress a little shaky. “Sorry, I’m still reeling from the reel,” she said as she joined Girish on stage for the sit-down grilling.

The blast of Blanchett Concentrate in the film clips left the actress a little shaky. “Sorry, I’m still reeling from the reel,” she said as she joined Girish on stage for the sit-down grilling.

How has growing up in Australia affected her as an artist? Blanchett greeted that question with remarkable candor: “Artists in Australia are not particularly valued by the government. There’s been a long history of Australians not consuming their own cultural products, so there’s a wonderful lack of interest in what you have to offer as an artist—which is right, because you expect the oranges to be thrown at you, and, when they’re not, you go, ‘Okay, it’s working.’

“If you have a chance to go overseas, you wouldn’t say to Rameau, ‘Thou shalt not travel.’ You do get inside other cultures by getting inside their filmmaking culture or their theatrical practice, or their literary practice, whatever it is. Australia is a very interesting place to grow up in, but I never once thought I would be an actor. I certainly didn’t feel I would be sitting here tonight. I’m sorry if I appear a bit strange, but I am massively overwhelmed about tonight’s honor.”

She pointed to the “Cate Blanchett” sign above her. “I’m not quite sure who that person is.”

Blanchett may have a right to wonder who that person is, given how many richly varied other people she has inhabited on the screen in some 90 films. They all, she was quick to confess, have the same constant: “Fear. Absolute fear. I’ve been married for quite a long time now, and so I can no longer ask my husband. I just turn over and go, ‘Andrew?’ And he goes, ‘It’ll be fine.’

“This notion of working out how you do it, working out who you are or working out your relationship to the work—it’s just nonsense, I think. When things are working, it’s all about flow, and you don’t need to ask questions until the flow stops. If it’s flowing, it’s easy, so you don’t think about the process. I think each project, each group of people that you’re with, each director, each script—reveals everything you need to do. There’s more inconsistency than consistency, but, if there was anything, it would probably be the fear of finally being found out.”

And what keeps Blanchett going back for more? “It’s the conversation with people. I’m not being disingenuous when I say that every time a film comes to an end, I feel profoundly what Liv Ullmann describes of Ingmar Bergman’s last moment on a set. She worked with him on Scenes from a Marriage, and they literally did not say goodbye to one another. He just walked out the door and left. It’s hard to say goodbye to those things. Every time I finish, I think, ‘That’s it. It’s done. I’m moving on to another chapter. There’s so much else to do in the world.’ Then you have a conversation with someone. It’s a wonderful idea. What they’re asking you to do is weird and impossible, and you think, ‘Oh, okay,’ and you do it again. You start thinking about time left.”

This thought led Blanchett to remember the 2010 Chaplin Award winner, director Robert Altman: “Years ago, we were talking about making a version of Mata Hari, and we were talking about dates, and I was trying to wiggle something around,” she recalled. “Do you remember that wonderful documentary that Laurie Anderson made about the face where you split the face in half, and each half projects something different? I said, ‘I don’t know if we can do it in the next six months,’ and he looked at me with the death side of his face, and he said, ‘Cate, I don’t have a lot of time.’ You do start thinking, ‘Well, how much time do I have?’”

Stage
Dinner
Arrivals
Outside

Cate Blanchett, mask with message: “Stop bombing hospitals”

Cate was seen recently wearing a mask that says “STOP Bombing Hospitals”. Last Sunday, she had moderated a Q&A for FOR SAMA — the filmmakers of this documentary are also advocating for the targeted bombing at hospitals to stop. They have started the campaign #StopBombingHospitals. You can find more information about the campaign on their official website.

April 27th 2022 marks 6 years since the brutal attack on Al Quds hospital in Aleppo – an attack you see in For Sama Film. It is on this anniversary that we are launching a global action to show solidarity with all brave medical colleagues who are saving lives under fire.

The international community has failed to hold the perpetrators of these war crimes to account. This is why Russia has been allowed to repeat these crimes over and over again – testing their war tactics over many years and now targeting healthcare facilities in Ukraine.

Dr. Hamza al-Kateab

The actress was photographed at New York’s JFK airport. Always, even on social media, she has been urging people to donate and help those who fled Ukraine due to the war.

The reference to the situation between Russia and Ukraine seems evident, also because Blanchett, UNHCR Goodwill Ambassador (United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees), has always expressed herself clearly on the ongoing war. “As the conflict and tragedy hit Ukraine, the world is watching,” she said in a video posted on the organization’s Twitter: Cate Blanchett has repeatedly called for donations to help UNHCR give life-saving aid to people fleeing Ukraine.

Her appeal did not go unheeded by the private sector which donated $200 million to help fleeing people. “Right now, all eyes in the world are on Ukraine. We stand in solidarity with people who are fleeing for their lives, whose families have been destroyed. We thank the private sector for their overwhelming generosity,” Blanchett said.

Cate Blanchett’s kids totally ‘disinterested’ in mom’s fame

Cate Blanchett’s kids couldn’t care less that their mom is a movie star.

“They have no idea, no idea,” the Australian actress told Page Six at Lincoln Center’s Alice Tully Hall Monday night, where she was honored with the prestigious Chaplin Award.

“I told them, ‘Oh I’m going to New York for 36 hours. I’ll be back on Wednesday…’ One of them is getting an award at school, and they went, ‘Oh, OK, have a good time.’”

Blanchett shares four children – Dashiell, 20, Roman, 18, Ignatius, 14, and Edith, 7 – with husband Andrew Upton.

The “Don’t Look Up” star, 52, told Page Six that her kids are totally “disinterested” in her fame, but “in the best possible, healthiest way.”

Regardless of how her children feel, Blanchett’s accolades are highly impressive and she’s regarded as one of the finest actresses of her generation.

In her years in the spotlight, she’s won two Oscars – for her roles in “The Aviator” and “Blue Jasmine” – and doesn’t seem to be slowing down any time soon.

“I was talking to somebody about the notion of arriving somewhere and how dangerous that can be when you think you’ve arrived. Without wanting to sound pretentious, I think it’s about a process of constantly becoming, like there’s a flow to it,” she told us.

“Every time someone wins an Oscar, there are five or six, maybe 15 other people who were equally deserving. It just happens to be your timing,” she continued.

“But, you know, not being from this filmmaking culture, and being recognized by this filmmaking culture tonight at the Chaplin Awards – such an international set of previous recipients – it’s such a deep and profound honor.”

Film at Lincoln Center Tributes Chaplin Winner Cate Blanchett

Glittering in flowing black sequins, two-time Oscar-winner Cate Blanchett, the second-youngest recipient of Film at Lincoln Center’s coveted 47th Chaplin Award, was ushered to her seat at Alice Tully Hall to resounding applause. As Film at Lincoln Center president Daniel H. Stern intoned the usual litany of praise and tribute to “one of the most versatile and talented actresses working today,” he eventually had to inform the crowd that the two starry presenters of the night, “Carol” filmmaker Todd Haynes (“Ooooh,” groaned the audience) and “Nightmare Alley” star Bradley Cooper (“ughh,” they moaned), couldn’t make the event due to a direct COVID hit, in Haynes’ case. Cooper was under the weather, he said. (A Searchlight source said Cooper’s daughter had COVID.)

A voice pierced the darkness. “I’m here!” cried Blanchett. The audience cheered.

Over the course of the night, between videos of former winners (including Bette Davis, Barbara Stanwyck, Sidney Poitier, Alfred Hitchcock, James Stewart, Robert Altman, and Meryl Streep) and Blanchett stans like fellow-Aussie Hugh Jackman, Martin Scorsese (“The Aviator”), and Richard Linklater (“Where’d You Go, Bernadette?”) who explained how Blanchett was a good ol’ Texas name, Blanchett and others had fun throwing a bit of shade on Cooper.

And later, when the co-deputy editor of Film Comment, Devika Girish, gracefully took over the career interview from Haynes, Blanchett responded charmingly to the younger woman’s queries about running the gamut of characters from Queen Elizabeth and Katharine Hepburn to a Middle Earth elf and Norse villain and working for directors Peter Jackson, Gillian Armstrong, Terrence Malick, Steven Soderbergh, and David Fincher. Like many actresses, it turns out that Blanchett is motivated by a combination of confidence, fear, and going with the flow. And if she’d had another career, she might have studied dance with Pina Bausch.

Finally, Blanchett loves cinema. “We have had a collective experience over the last two years to a greater or lesser degree that has been deeply, profoundly confronting,” she said,  “and dealing with our situation through allegory and metaphor, which is what film is. It has been providing us with a collective catharsis. Our cinema is ripe for an enormous lift, because we want to be together in a room, we want to be experiencing something in the dark together with strangers and with friends, and being united by something that we’re seeing together.”

After a rough weekend, Film at Lincoln Center’s Lesli Klainberg and Eugene Hernandez were relieved that the event went smoothly after scrambling to pull it together. At the end of the night, Haynes’ producer Christine Vachon took on the presenting role. And at the elegant sponsor and patron black-tie dinner at Lincoln Center’s David H. Koch Theatre, Vachon explained how Haynes arrived from Portland, Oregon not feeling at all well. She got him tested, and sure enough, he was positive.

As for Blanchett, these days she just rolls with the punches, she told me, as she looks forward to getting back to work in London on Alfonso Cuaron’s Apple TV+ mini-series “Disclaimer,” about television documentary journalist Catherine Ravenscroft, in which she and Sacha Baron Cohen play the parents of Kodi Smit-McPhee.

Cate Blanchett Says Elon Musk’s Twitter Takeover Is ‘Very Dangerous’

Director Adam McKay’s Netflix film “Don’t Look Up,” which starred Leonardo DiCaprio, Jennifer Lawrence, Meryl Streep, Cate Blanchett, Mark Rylance and more A-listers, made a splash last winter for how the dark, political comedy eerily mirrored real life. The film tackled issues of climate change and media misinformation, and one fictional tech billionaire character hit even closer to home after Elon Musk and Twitter agreed to a $44 billion deal on Monday.

“It’s dangerous,” Blanchett told Variety about Musk’s Twitter takeover, at the Chaplin Award Gala in New York on Monday. “That’s all I have to say, it’s very, very dangerous.”

Rylance’s character, Peter Isherwell, an eccentric tech CEO who profits off a comet hurtling toward Earth, was based partly on Musk, Jeff Bezos, Mark Zuckerberg and Steve Jobs. In “Don’t Look Up,” the comet becomes a politicized and misinformed issue, as Isherwell helps spin the catastrophe into a cash-grab and job-creating scheme that picks up widespread support. After Musk’s shocking Twitter deal, the “Don’t Look Up” character seems even more ripped from the headlines.

“I think the future is often imagined in the mind of the artist,” Blanchett told Variety. “Adam wrote this well and truly pre-pandemic. It was really interesting to see how much meaning an audience brings to a work. If the audience viewed the same script, the same story performed in exactly the same way, pre-pandemic, it would’ve been a very different response to the takeaway than the audience has now. That speaks to the power of the zeitgeist and the times in which we live.”

In “Don’t Look Up,” Blanchett played a talk-show host who dismissed the urgency of the comet disaster live on air. Earlier this month, a “Good Morning Britain” interview went viral after the TV anchor downplayed a climate activist’s serious concerns about the world’s growing oil use.

The Oscar best picture-nominated film was one of many on display at the 47th Chaplin Award Gala, where Blanchett was being honored. The two-time Academy Award winner became the second-youngest recipient of the Chaplin Award. Past honorees include Spike Lee, Helen Mirren, Robert De Niro, Morgan Freeman, Streep, Tom Hanks and other film icons.

The Lincoln Center celebration included several montages of Blanchett’s work, including “Blue Jasmine,” “The Aviator,” “Carol,” “Elizabeth: The Golden Age,” “Thor: Ragnarok,” “Lord of the Rings,” “Nightmare Alley” and more. There were also video tributes from some of her directors and collaborators, like Martin Scorsese, Hugh Jackman, Richard Linklater and James Gray.

However, the celebration was not without a few hitches; presenters Todd Haynes and Bradley Cooper were unable to attend, as planned. Haynes, who directed Blanchett in “Carol,” tested positive for COVID on Monday morning, and Cooper, her “Nightmare Alley” co-star, was “not feeling well,” Film at Lincoln Center chair Dan Stern announced at the beginning of the ceremony. Blanchett was quick to poke fun at Cooper’s absence.

“There’s a few empty seats there; there’s a few people who either didn’t want to come up and said they had COVID or actually really had COVID — Bradley!” Blanchett joked. During her acceptance speech, she went after her co-star again. “I want to thank all those people who’ve been paid to say such wonderful things about me this evening. And to all of those who offered to be here, but couldn’t due to contracting COVID — rest up — or laziness, whatever.”

Sources: The Observer, Corriere, Page Six, Indiewire, Variety

47th Chaplin Awards
Posted on
Apr 26, 2022

47th Chaplin Awards

Hello, Cate Blanchett fans!

Last night Cate was honored at the 47th Chaplin Awards by Film at Lincoln Center. Christine Vachon, who is the producer for both I’m Not There and Carol, presented the award to Cate. Check the videos and photos mostly shared by fans who were at the event.

According to Film at Lincoln Center a recording of the event will be available but as we wait you can check Cate’s speech recorded by an attendee.


Cate Blanchett on Perfect Magazine
Posted on
Mar 22, 2022

Cate Blanchett on Perfect Magazine

Hi, everyone!

Cate has been featured as one of the covers on Perfect Issue Two. You can read the accompanying interview with the photoshoot below. A few film posters are also made. The magazine is available to purchase here.

Perfect Issue Two


Perfect Issue Two – 2022 (Scans)

Towards the end of a brief, if instructive, telephone exchange with Cate Blanchett, the actress drops in a small life detail which explains a sizeable corner of her story. Blanchett has an unblemished media profile. She is loved by audiences and industry alike for her work, while left alone to her private life without seeming either cautious or guarded. She has spoken up on weighty issues while appearing neither sanctimonious nor overly punctilious. She is allowed both a sense of humour and circumspect seriousness, knowing as if by instinct exactly when to powerfully deploy both.

So our conversation begins with a genial exchange about her loyal, old, incontinent dog, Fletcher, who is starting to develop some other old-man issues.

‘I watched The Father again the other day,’ she says breezily. ‘It’s such a beautiful film and the performances are all so perfect. I’ve started to call our Labrador Anthony because he has dementia. As in Hopkins.’

He doesn’t sound like the easiest pet.

‘I know. But I love him. I adore him. Now that we’ve all turned our Zoom cameras off and resorted to the old-fashioned telephone – which is a relief, frankly – I was having quite a high-powered conversation with someone. It went silent and so I had to ask, “What has happened to you?’”And she had to say, “The cat’s just been sick in my hand.”’

It is the week before Christmas, 2021. Blanchett has just wrapped Todd Field’s Tár, an experimental film about the first German female orchestra conductor, a script she describes as ‘undeniable’. Her latest theatrical release, Don’t Look Up, a talking-point satire on the climate catastrophe with a peerlessly starry cast, is about to drop onto Netflix on Christmas Eve. It has yet to split opinion directly down the middle. Within seven days of talking to her, it turns into the cultural touchstone of this year’s festivities, the film on which everyone must have an opinion. Again, it is the kind of perfect social media storm from which Cate Blanchett has somehow managed to stay eternally, imperviously at arm’s length.

I’d asked the actor if she kept a journal throughout her work, making personal records of her professional experience. Blanchett has been central to some of the most profound cinema of the late movie age, her portfolio taking in both epic blockbusters and arthouse curios with an even hand, bringing something unique and imperceptible to both. Her best performances, in Todd Haynes’ Carol, for which she was Oscar-nominated, and Woody Allen’s Blue Jasmine, for which she won, mine a tricky vein of human behaviour, lodged somewhere at the sticking point between repression and expression, a point where neither quite triumphs.

She is one of the big screen’s few certainties at a time when cinema’s crown is slipping, as the medium resistantly twists from collective, committed experience to more spurious, dip-in-dip-out home entertainment. Blanchett is primed to have documented this epoch in detail. Her production company moved deftly into television with the startling birth-of-US-feminism story, Mrs America, and she has enjoyed a five-year tenure as an artistic director at the Sydney Theatre Company. Yet she will always be most revered for becoming as trusted a pair of performance hands as Hollywood knows.

Has she kept a diary throughout it all?

She laughs aloud. ‘Hahaha, I wish.’

One of Blanchett’s great professional skills is to give complicated material a strangely relatable twist, to find the human burrowed away in the emblematic. I first noticed her do it in The Talented Mr Ripley, when she played romantic deception and being taken for a fool with skittish ire rather than boo-hoo breakdown. The script could have gone either way.

In Don’t Look Up she plays a daytime TV host with toxic bleached hair and figure-hugging scarlet skirt suit who treats the impending end of the earth as oddly sexual. The film has been criticised for some of its broadsides. Blanchett is categorically not one of them. It is Blanchett’s character who notices the hotness of Leonardo DiCaprio’s space scientist behind the beard, christening him an AILF (‘astronomer I’d like to fuck’). With finely honed, demented determination, she manifests the action speedily, decisively and with some enviable truculence. Again, it feels like a new performance route, underlining the transactional nature of sex among high-flying professionals.

‘I have an actor friend,’ she says, on the subject of keeping a personal record of work. ‘A male friend. He was very studious about that. Back in the days when you put cuttings in scrap books, he was always about recording the things that he had done, probably to make them real for himself. In a way, it was controlling it.’ She doesn’t specify who the actor was. ‘Ultimately, I think he was quite interested in legacy. Whereas I’m more interested in the experience. I don’t know. I think it’s all quite ephemeral and random. It’s not for me to record those things.’

She pauses politely, but the point is made. Her career is about getting good work done, not celebrating the fact that good work has been done.

‘Maybe I should?’ she asks, flipping into the conversation the possibility that she might have been getting her attitude to work wrong all this time. To which one can only respond: as if.

For awards season 2022, Cate Blanchett has two steady horses in the race. The first is Don’t Look Up, the first full commercial crossover from the politically minded director, Adam McKay. Its contention has been utterly delightful, suggesting it will be the one film from 2021’s patchy cinema sketchbook that we may still be talking about in 2041. McKay uses some of his collaged, found-material signature style and abstract taste for pricking pomposity to propel an energetic story about a meteorite heading towards earth.

McKay’s move to major-league director has had deep audience repercussions, which may yet come to help or hinder its reception at The Academy. It hardly matters. Whichever side of the Don’t Look Up fence you sit on – for what it’s worth, I loved it – the film’s prominence during a cultural year dominated with the reheated leftovers of the late 20th-century mass market (Abba, West Side Story, The Beatles, Dune, James Bond etc) arrived like a breath of fresh air. As another year trundled to its slow, diseased end, at least someone was talking about something that mattered in the here and now.

Blanchett’s second awards contender is the delightfully prickly Nightmare Alley, a story of one man’s complete moral collapse – already notorious prior to release for a brief first cinematic sighting of leading man Bradley Cooper’s penis in an early bathtub scene. It is the virtuoso cineaste Guillermo del Toro’s follow-up to his atypically sweet-natured fantasia The Shape of Water, the last Oscar-winning Best Picture prior to Covid. Del Toro is back to his noir finest with the picture, letting his visual imagination run wild, this time in the mis-en-scène of a mid-century circus.

Blanchett’s co-stars in both, besides Cooper and DiCaprio, read like a roll-call of modern screen celebrity: Meryl Streep, Timothée Chalamet, Ariana Grande, Jennifer Lawrence, Rob Morgan, Jonah Hill, Kid Cudi, Tyler Perry, Rooney Mara, Toni Collette, Willem Defoe, Ron Perlman, David Strathairn. The actress says she selects work starting with the director.

‘In the end, when people ask “what sort of roles do you want to play?” I have no idea,’ she notes. ‘It’s about the arc and what comes along. If Guillermo asks you to do something, you say “absolutely – what do you want me to do?” It’s about being part of that conversation, you know?’ She felt the same about McKay. ‘I thought that was a story that I wanted to be a part of telling. That was a director I wanted to work with. The cast evolved to be, like Nightmare Alley, extraordinary. But it all starts with the director. It’s a double whammy.’

Del Toro had been attached to The Lord of the Rings trilogy, the films which sent Blanchett’s star astral in the early 2000s, before being replaced by Peter Jackson. ‘By the time I came along it was back in the hands of Peter, so I don’t know what happened there,’ she says. ‘But I think that Guillermo had been there for a while, that was the early stages. We’d been talking for a while about working together. There was talk of a television series, one thing and another several years ago, which didn’t come about. It was so wonderful to finally make something together. Without wanting to sound pretentious, I was so excited to be a part of Guillermo’s cinematic vision.’

She describes Nightmare Alley as ‘first and foremost about this self-made monster’. Cooper plays Stanton Carlisle, a hot, shady brute with Indiana Jones headgear and a past, who arrives at a carnival to teach himself the skills of the circus. As he leaves the fair to make his way in the city with his belle on his arm, he encounters Blanchett’s Lilith, a sly, vampish psychoanalyst who spots a phoney. She determines to untangle the immaculately ruthless showman Stan has become; to reveal, like the Wizard in Oz, the charlatan beneath.

‘There are three very different types of women that Stan encounters,’ says Blanchett. ‘He encounters almost a mother figure [Colette], an innocent [Mara] and then an ambiguous, unknowable, world-weary woman [Blanchett] with dark secrets and untold damage. Each of the women and each of those relationships are quite particular. I hope I fulfilled that function.’

She says the moment she stepped on set she was absorbed into the world of Del Toro’s twisted imagination. ‘Oh, totally. I spent all my time, really, with Bradley in one room. That room, when the doors shut, was just us.’ They make spectacular sparring partners, attempting to outsmart one another in a series of balletically choreographed psychosexual set-pieces. ‘There was no need for bits of green-screen. No wondering how the film might come to life. No worrying that you might not feel it. It’s intimate. All of those details are there for you. It’s not like somebody else comes along and inspects the set. Guillermo is over every single detail.’

Even at script-reading stage, the wonderfully dystopian world of Nightmare Alley was alive to her. ‘The thrust of the scenes and their function within the whole narrative is really clear. You get the reader’s script and [are] compelled by the narrative. In terms of the detail of the dialogue, that was finessed on the set.’ She describes working for Del Toro as a surprisingly fluid affair. ‘Really, he’s incredibly open to seeing how the actors might want to move in the space. For Bradley and I, all of our stuff happens in that one office. It was a luxury in a way. We got to work it out. There were a specific number of scenes we had together – how does that feel? How does it move? How does it look?’ Hearing her process is both engaging and informative. ‘We were constantly playing and rehearsing, even when we were shooting.‘

Blanchett is gifted the best line of the film as her exit, while wrapped in a telephone wire. ‘From memory, I think that came up on the day,’ she says. ‘I was being strangled by a cord but not wanting to make it a purely violent scene, to make it complicated. The character of Lilith really pushes Stan to the edge. She wants him to reveal the things that make him who he truly is so that he can see who he truly is. He can’t hide from himself any more. When he starts to really become that weak, that’s the most terrifying part of the journey for him. But she has to push him that far at her own peril.’ Viewers will be routinely forgiven for spotting an allegory for old Hollywood in the story.

The part of Lilith is almost quintessentially Cate Blanchett, feeling at once as if it is lifted from another time and place, a golden age of cinema which she could have quite happily glided through; hair set just so, red lips immaculately applied. She avers at the observation. ‘I don’t know what that is. What does that mean?’

It’s almost super-you.

‘Super-me? I don’t know if that’s an insult or a compliment.’

Rarely does Blanchett sound as in control of a conversation than when she undercuts herself. It’s quite the skill.

Cate Blanchett was one of the earliest voices in cinema to speak up on the disasters of the environment. As her fame escalated, she brought her conscience along for the ride. Her role in Don’t Look Up brings with it a depth and acuity few others could offer in her steely interpretation of the tin-eared newscaster. ‘I think actors are hungry for big stories,’ she says. ‘I think audiences are, too. I don’t mean big stories that are long. I just mean high stakes. Big images where you can dispense with language. In a way, narrative can be suspended, almost.’

Few issues come bigger than the climate, yet so little art is made about it. ‘Yes,’ she says conclusively. ‘I don’t know that there’s been a moment in history that has been this collectively faced, where culturally it hasn’t been addressed.’

The great abandonment of the climate by the arts might be attributable to the idea of the end of the world being such a trope in film already. Every superhero narrative follows an arc of a threat to the world and the superpower who can save it. ‘The end of the world has always been shrouded in notions of the future, whereas the end of the world now feels possible in the near present. It’s very hard to find a laugh or be transported by it. And Adam has somehow been able to.’

With Don’t Look Up, McKay has fashioned the definition of an iron fist in a velvet glove. It has tapped nerves for all the right reasons. ‘Climate change itself gets addressed in essays and long-form journalism and journals, but artists themselves have not yet addressed it through narrative or fiction or works of cinema.’ Cate Blanchett understands the reasoning. ‘I think it’s because it’s become, unfortunately, a political battleground. So somehow, if you discuss it or imagine a way of setting a story within that landscape, it automatically becomes agit-prop.‘

Protesting war is sexy. Protesting injustice and prejudice is righteous. Protesting the planet is complicated, murky and enormous. ‘Where Adam has come so far is by making a film that’s about climate change that is not about climate change. And it’s funny and it’s witty and it’s really, ultimately incredibly moving.’

It is also prescient. ‘Every two or three weeks I’d text him when something new happened,’ she explains. ‘You know, there was a point where a meteorite was coming close to the earth’s orbit? And I said, “Did you have a crystal ball?” He wrote this and we were meant to film it pre-pandemic. Then it got pushed and pushed and pushed. He imagined all of this. He had this in his mind for quite some time. I find that kind of incredible, actually.’

The reason Cate Blanchett has a blemish-free media slate is mostly because she has a blemish-free belief in the power of storytelling.

What has acting taught her about the extremes of the human condition?

‘That you can’t rule anything out. You know, we often behave in quite unexpected ways in extreme conditions.’

She plucks an example from the air. ‘It’s like when the car’s about to crash. You expect screaming and yelling, but everyone is suddenly quite calm. There’s quiet. Often, we behave in polar opposite ways than we would anticipate. I think that everything’s up for grabs at the moment, because we are in such an unprecedented world. Though we should have seen it coming, of course, the situation of a species that we have all been through, no matter what our socioeconomic standing or our economic loss or our uncertainty. I think we’re all alive to behaving in ways that are surprising to other people, but also to ourselves.’

Perfect Issue Two – Film Posters

Source: Perfect

28th Screen Actors Guild Awards
Posted on
Mar 4, 2022

28th Screen Actors Guild Awards

Happy Friday, everyone!

Last Sunday, Cate attended the 2022 Screen Actors Guild Awards. She was nominated for her performance in supporting role in Nightmare Alley as well as for best ensemble with Don’t Look Up cast. She presented a clip from Don’t Look Up with Meryl Streep and Tyler Perry, and the Screen Actors Guild Lifetime Achievement Award to Dame Helen Mirren. Check out the videos and photos below.

28th Screen Actors Guild Awards – Arrival

Cate arrived on the red carpet at around 1:54:11

28th Screen Actors Guild Awards – Show

28th Screen Actors Guild Awards – Audience & Stage

28th Screen Actors Guild Awards – Backstage

28th Screen Actors Guild Awards – Photoshoot

28th Screen Actors Guild Awards – BTS

 

Cate Blanchett at 47th César Awards
Posted on
Feb 26, 2022

Cate Blanchett at 47th César Awards

Hello, everyone!

On February 25th 2022, Cate received César d’Honneur Award from the French Film Academy, which was presented by her friend, French actor, Isabelle Huppert. She is the first Australian to receive a César. She also presented the award for Best Director.

Arrival and Red Carpet Interviews

47th Cesar Awards – Arrivals – February 25th 2022

Ceremony

The article below is Google translated

Isabelle Huppert warmly hands the Honorary Cesar to Cate Blanchett

On the one hand, Isabelle Huppert, muse of Claude Chabrol, Benoît Jacquot or even Michael Haneke, has two Césars and so many international prizes. On the other, Cate Blanchett, Australian actress with two Oscars, for Aviator (2004) and Blue Jasmine (2013). In 2014, these two “sacred monsters” met on stage for the adaptation of The Maids ,a play by Jean Genet. Seven years later, they find themselves on the stage of the 47th Cesar ceremony, which takes place this Friday, February 25, in the legendary hall of the Olympia, in Paris. It was Isabelle Huppert who presented her friend Cate Blanchett with the Honorary Cesar for her entire career, it is a mutual tribute that the two actresses paid to each other.

“My dear Cate. You alone populate the planet of cinema, this continent that you tirelessly explore… but you are neither tenant nor owner. You are too free for that,” Isabelle Huppert, in a flamboyant black dress, tenderly began. And to continue: “Your freedom is what tells you best. It allows you all the audacity. You can play anything, a man, a snake. You make us want to become the characters you play, you inspire us with these desires for freedom.” In her long tirade, the actress also hailed the strength and extraordinary career of the 52-year-old actress. And underlined the importance of her gaze and her eyes, sometimes “laughing, sad, candid, intelligent, naive, unfathomable, dreamy, wild… terribly human”.

An ode to French cinema

But eyes also moved, and misted with tears. Because after a hug and a long standing ovation from the public present at the Olympia, Cate Blanchett could not contain her emotion. “I don’t know if I’m crying because I realize how old I am …”, she quipped, before continuing: “Thank you from the bottom of my heart. It’s hard to talk about anything other than the situation in Ukraine, but we’re here to celebrate cinema. I would therefore like to express my thanks to the Academy. It is a real privilege to receive this César from the hands of my friend Isabelle, who represents French cinema”.

Unsurprisingly, Cate Blanchett, a great admirer of the New Wave, but also marked by A Man Escaped by Robert Bresson (1956), wanted to pay tribute to the beauty and usefulness of the seventh art. “I have always admired the ability of French cinema to be loved and celebrated nationally by its own audience,” she explained. The actress said she was “struck by the influence” of it and by its creativity. So many ideas that help “to understand the world and to change it”.

47th Cesar Awards – Audience & Show – February 25th 2022

Backstage and Press Room

47th Cesar Awards – Backstage – February 25th 2022

47th Cesar Awards – Press Room – February 25th 2022

Source: Madame Figaro

Cate Blanchett to received Chaplin Award; and additional Goya 2022 photos
Posted on
Feb 19, 2022

Cate Blanchett to received Chaplin Award; and additional Goya 2022 photos

Happy weekend, everyone!

Another thrilling news, Cate will be presented with Chaplin Award from Film at Lincoln Center at a gala on April 25th 2022. She is the second youngest recipient of the award. We have added Goya 2022 photos on the gallery. Thank you to Cate Blanchett China for some of the photos.

Cate Blanchett – 47th Chaplin Award Recipient

Cate Blanchett, the Australian actress who has two Oscars to her name, has been tapped for the 47th Chaplin Award, the highest honor presented by — and biggest annual fundraiser for — Film at Lincoln Center, FLC announced Friday.

Blanchett will be feted April 25 at Lincoln Center’s historic Alice Tully Hall at the conclusion of an evening featuring clips of her work, tributes from friends and colleagues and a career-retrospective conversation.

At just 52, Blanchett is the Chaplin Award’s second-youngest recipient. Tom Hanks was also 52, but 38 days younger, when he was honored in 2009.

You can click on the image for the gala tickets.

Film at Lincoln Center is pleased to announce Cate Blanchett as the recipient of the organization’s 47th Chaplin Award, to be presented at a gala honoring her on April 25th at Lincoln Center’s Alice Tully Hall. The evening will be a joyful celebration of the actor’s incredible filmography, featuring notable speakers, film clips, and a career-spanning conversation culminating in the presentation of the Chaplin Award. The event promises to be an extraordinary recognition of an actor who has portrayed some of the most memorable characters committed to film, including Academy Award®-winning performances for Blue Jasmine and The Aviator.

Gala tickets are on sale now. Tribute-only tickets range in price from $250 – $750 and may be purchased here, with tickets for FLC Members starting at $200.  You can secure premium seating at the Chaplin Award Gala Tribute by purchasing Gala Dinner and Tribute tickets, starting at $3,000, here or by contacting us at galarsvp@filmlinc.org. All proceeds from the Chaplin Award Gala benefit Film at Lincoln Center’s programs and activities as a nonprofit organization.

“We are thrilled to welcome Cate Blanchett back to Film at Lincoln Center, where three of her films have previously screened as part of the New York Film Festival,” said Lesli Klainberg, Executive Director of Film at Lincoln Center. “Ms. Blanchett’s career includes extraordinary performances in films ranging from small independent efforts to major studio franchises and with some of the most renowned directors of our time. It is our privilege to dedicate an evening of celebration to her, and add one more accolade to her many well-deserved awards.”

“It’s a privilege to honor Ms. Blanchett at this year’s Chaplin Gala.” said Dan Stern, Board Chairman for Film at Lincoln Center. “Cate never ceases to amaze us with her stellar and wide-ranging performances and we’re excited to have her join us for this special evening on campus at Lincoln Center.”

The Chaplin Award Gala is the most important fundraising event of the year for Film at Lincoln Center, with all proceeds benefiting the organization in its mission to support the art and craft of cinema.

Cate Blanchett is an internationally acclaimed actor, producer, artistic director, humanitarian and dedicated member of the arts community. She is the co-Founder and Principal of film and television production company Dirty Films, alongside her partners Andrew Upton and Coco Francini. Most recently, Dirty Films executive produced Christos Nikou’s “Apples” which has been named one of the year’s best International Films by the National Board of Review. Dirty Films most recently produced the highly acclaimed Mrs. America for FX and Hulu, as well as the Netflix limited series STATELESS, which received a record breaking 18 Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts (AACTA) nominations, winning 13. Dirty Films has a first look deal with FX Productions for television projects, and with New Republic Pictures for feature films.

Blanchett is currently in preproduction for the Apple series, “Disclaimer,” created by Alfonso Cuarón. Most recently, Blanchett wrapped production on the upcoming Todd Field film, “Tar.” Prior to that, she wrapped production on Eli Roth’s Borderlands. She also recently completed work on Adam McKay’s film, Don’t Look Up, as well as Guillermo del Toro’s Nightmare Alley and Pinocchio. Additionally, it was recently announced that Blanchett will executive produce and star in Pedro Almodóvar’s first English-language feature film, “A Manual for Cleaning Women” as well as Warwick Thornton’s “The New Boy.” In 2015, she appeared in the title role of Carol, which she produced with Dirty Films and was directed by Todd Haynes. She received an Oscar, BAFTA, Golden Globe, Independent Spirit and SAG nomination for her performance. The same year, she appeared as Mary Mapes in Truth opposite Robert Redford. Blanchett has won Academy Awards for Best Actress on behalf of her performance as Jasmine in the film Blue Jasmine, and Best Supporting Actress for her portrayal of Katharine Hepburn in Martin Scorsese’s The Aviator. In 2008, Blanchett was nominated for two Academy Awards; one for Best Actress in Elizabeth: The Golden Age and one for Best Supporting Actress in I’m Not There. She was only the fifth actor in Academy history to be nominated in both acting categories in the same year. She also received dual SAG and BAFTA Award nominations for each role, and won a Golden Globe Award, Independent Spirit Award, several critics groups’ awards, and the Volpi Cup for Best Actress at the Venice Film Festival for I’m Not There.

She has created visual artworks with Julian Rosefeldt’s art film and installation, Manifesto, Marco Brambilla’s The Four Temperaments, and a video portrait of herself with David Rosetzky.

Blanchett served alongside Upton as the co-Artistic Director and co-CEO of the Sydney Theatre Company between 2008-2013, producing between 19 and 20 shows a year, which toured extensively nationally and internationally. Their most notable productions include; Tennessee Williams’ A Streetcar Named Desire, directed by Liv Ullman; Anton Chekhov’s Uncle Vanya directed by Tamas Ascher,  Steven Soderbergh’s Tot Mom; Benedict Andrew’s highly acclaimed productions of the War of the Roses, The Maids, Gross Und Klein, and the sminal adaptation of The Secret River by Neil Armfield which has since inspired the title-sharing ABC television series; Andrew Upton’s The Present, directed by John Crowley for which Blanchett earned a Tony Award nomination. Recently, Blanchett’s has appeard on stage on the controversial adaptation of Martin Crimp’s National Theatre production When We Have Sufficiently Tortured Each Other.

In 2010, Blanchett and Upton were awarded with the Green Globe Award for their Green Contribution at the Sydney Theatre Company, becoming one of the World’s Greenest Arts Organizations.

Blanchett is a Global Goodwill Ambassador for UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency and a lifetime member of the Australian Conservation Foundation, a strong supporter of the Actors Benevolent Fund, the SAG-AFTRA Foundation, the Australian Wildlife Conservancy, an AFI Ambassador and Patron of the Sydney Film Festival and the NIDA Foundation.

Blanchett holds a BFI Fellowship from the BFI London Film Festival and was awarded the Women in Film Crystal + Lucy Award for expanding the roles of women in film; the Crystal Award at the World Economic Forum in Davos in 2018 for her work with UNHCR and has received the 2018 Stanley Kubrick Award for Excellence in Film. She has been awarded the Centenary Medal of Service to Australian Society through Acting and has received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

In 2018, Blanchett served as Jury President of the 71st Cannes International Film Festival and she was the Jury President of the 77th Venice International Film Festival in 2020.

Blanchett holds Honorary Doctorates of Letters from the University of New South Wales, the University of Sydney, and Macquarie University. In recognition of her continued advocacy for the arts and her support of humanitarian and environmental causes, Blanchett has been awarded the Companion of the Order of Australia in the General Division; she was also awarded the Chevalier de l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres by the French Minister of Culture. She lives in the English countryside with her husband Andrew Upton, their four children, three dogs, twelve chickens and two pigs.

The annual Gala began in 1972 when it honored Charlie Chaplin, who returned to the U.S. from exile to accept the commendation. Since then, the Chaplin Award has been presented to many of the film industry’s most notable talents, including Alfred Hitchcock, Billy Wilder, Federico Fellini, Elizabeth Taylor, Bette Davis, James Stewart, Robert Altman, Martin Scorsese, Diane Keaton, Meryl Streep, Tom Hanks, Sidney Poitier, Barbra Streisand, Robert Redford, Morgan Freeman, Robert De Niro, Helen Mirren, and Spike Lee.

Film at Lincoln Center gives special thanks to the 47th Chaplin Award Gala Co-Chairs: Imelda and Peter Sobiloff and Daniel and Nanna Stern.

The Chaplin Award Gala will adhere to a comprehensive series of health and safety policies in coordination with state and city medical experts. Visit our health & safety page more information.

Premios Goya 2022

36th Goya Awards – Photocall – February 12th 2022

36th Goya Awards – Arrivals – February 12th 2022

36th Goya Awards – Stage – February 12th 2022

36th Goya Awards Portraits

36th Goya Awards Portraits – BTS

Source: THR, FLC

Cate Blanchett at Goya Awards 2022 – Photos & Videos; and New Podcast
Posted on
Feb 13, 2022

Cate Blanchett at Goya Awards 2022 – Photos & Videos; and New Podcast

Hola, Cate Blanchett fans! What a weekend we have!

The new episode, with Cate, of Talk Easy with Sam Fragoso has been released. You can listen below. Cate has been presented with the inaugural International Goya Award last night in Valencia, Spain. Pedro Almodóvar and Penélope Cruz presented the award. Check out the photos and videos from yesterday.

A Tea with Cate Blanchett

Goya Awards Ceremony

36th Goya Awards – Stage – February 12th 2022

https://twitter.com/AgustinAlmo/status/1492617527687528448

Photocall and Press Conference

Photocall

 Press Con

The text below is google translated but the source is linked at the end of this post.

Cate Blanchett, “speechless” for receiving the first International Goya

With a sweet “Hello!”, the actress Cate Blanchett has conquered the press that was waiting for her in the hall of the Palau de les Arts de València. Many of them welcomed her to the city that hosts, for the first time, the Goya ceremony.

She, on the other hand, “does not need introductions”, as Mariano Barroso, director of the Film Academy, has pointed out, who has accompanied her in the pose before the incessant shooting of the photographers. Then she, alone, elegantly, she has smiled at everyone dressed in a pink suit jacket and sneakers, before explaining that “I was speechless when they called me to tell me that they gave me the award.”

Cate Blanchett: “The Academy Award means that what I do has reached a different culture and audience”

It had raised maximum expectation and did not disappoint. Cate Blanchett starred this Saturday in a massive meeting with the media a few hours before receiving at the Palau de les Arts in Valencia the International Goya Award created this year by the Film Academy to “recognize personalities who contribute to cinema as an art that unites cultures and viewers of all the world”. In her case, she is also awarded for being “an actress who has played unforgettable characters that are already part of our memory and our present.” The Australian actress and producer was satisfied and excited, and she thanked the Film Academy for this recognition, which represents support for her career. “I come from Australia, where we have a small but quite powerful film industry, and being in Valencia receiving an award from the Spanish Academy means a lot to me,

In a room packed with journalists, cameras and photographers, the president of the Film Academy, Mariano Barroso , opened the event by welcoming Cate Blanchett, who was very grateful for the award. “When they called me to tell me that they were going to give me the International Goya, I was speechless, because Spanish cinema has had a fundamental influence on me, not only because of the work of Almodóvar and Amenábar, but also because of all cinema spoken in Spanish” he explained.

Winner of two Oscars, for Best Leading Actress for Woody Allen ‘s Blue Jasmine , and Best Supporting Actress for Martin Scorsese ‘s The Aviator. .In addition to three Golden Globes, three BAFTAs and three Screen Actors Guild Awards, Blanchett is one of the greatest talents in world cinema today. Some awards that represent recognition of his professional career. “I am old enough to say that I have a career, and I hope that it will continue to advance and take me in multiple directions. The creative path is full of deviations, it is not a straight line. If one decides to make applause the objective of the experience and ignore what work is, one is making a mistake. When you make a movie, a play, a book, how the audience is going to receive it is completely out of your control.”

Project with Almodovar

The actor spoke with enthusiasm about her upcoming projects, among which is Manual for cleaning women , by Pedro Almodóvar, an adaptation of the book by Lucía Berlín produced by El Deseo and Dirty Films, a company of which she is the founder and director together with Andrew Upton(with whom he chaired and artistically directed the Sydney Theater Company from 2008 to 2014. He had words of praise and admiration for the director from La Mancha. “I have known him for 20 years and we have been talking about working together for a long time. Now we have found a project that excites us both. There was another that did not materialize because it was not the right time, but now it is, “he revealed, adding that making this adaptation “means working with a person and a film culture that I love. It has always interested me and allows me to enter Pedro’s universe”.

This will be Almodóvar’s first film in English. “The key to working with him is that he is an excellent writer, an artist. All his cinema, everything he has created has a brutal influence. The script that he has proposed to me is unique, I had not seen something like it. Lucia Berlin’s stories can be represented cinematographically in very different ways, but Pedro’s point of view makes us go further, that we delve into concepts that have to do with addiction at different levels. We are going to talk about addictive relationships, but also about substance addiction, ”she recounted enthusiastically.

In addition, Blanchett currently has Nightmare Alley by Guillermo del Toro which she said “generates a great story behind each character that helps you a lot.”

Academies and festivals

Blanchett highlighted the important role of film academies and festivals today. “They have much more than nominees, red carpet and awards. There is work to support the industry and they are mentors in a process that has to look at the present and the future without fear. We find social movements such as Black Lives Matter or MeToo that must be understood and included. That inclusivity has to be adapted at all levels. If an academy does not understand these concepts and does not look to the future, it ends up being irrelevant, ”she said bluntly.

She also referenced the damage the pandemic has done to culture. “We have all missed going to a movie theater and all these types of cultural events that allow us to share experiences with complete strangers. We have missed it in the cinema, but in the theater even more”, she assured, although she acknowledged that the cinema was already “in danger” before the virus spread. “I had the hope, which I still do, that once we go out on the street we would really want to meet and we would do it in a movie theater. I don’t lose it.” But “we must be aware of what has happened: for 18 months we have been consuming on platforms,” she said, after considering that “the works should be seen as they have been planned. When we talk about creativity we talk about great ideas. The size of the screens doesn’t matter if the ideas are big”. The Australian actress and producer is currently involved in the pre-production of the series Disclaimer, directed by Alfonso Cuarón for AppleTV+, in which she will star and executive produce, and has just wrapped filming on Todd Field ‘s TAR , which she also produces and stars in, and Guillermo del Toro’s version of Pinocchio , for Netflix.

Arrival and red carpet

Source: La Vanguardia, Premios Goya

36th Goya Awards Press Conference + Photocall Photos
Posted on
Feb 12, 2022

36th Goya Awards Press Conference + Photocall Photos

Hi, everyone!

While we are waiting for Cate to receive the award from Premios Goya, here are some photos from press conference. There has been additional photos on the photocall folder too. Enjoy!

36th Goya Awards – Press Conference – February 12th 2022

36th Goya Awards – Photocall – February 12th 2022