Cate Blanchett to received Chaplin Award; and additional Goya 2022 photos
Posted on
Feb 19, 2022

Cate Blanchett to received Chaplin Award; and additional Goya 2022 photos

Happy weekend, everyone!

Another thrilling news, Cate will be presented with Chaplin Award from Film at Lincoln Center at a gala on April 25th 2022. She is the second youngest recipient of the award. We have added Goya 2022 photos on the gallery. Thank you to Cate Blanchett China for some of the photos.

Cate Blanchett – 47th Chaplin Award Recipient

Cate Blanchett, the Australian actress who has two Oscars to her name, has been tapped for the 47th Chaplin Award, the highest honor presented by — and biggest annual fundraiser for — Film at Lincoln Center, FLC announced Friday.

Blanchett will be feted April 25 at Lincoln Center’s historic Alice Tully Hall at the conclusion of an evening featuring clips of her work, tributes from friends and colleagues and a career-retrospective conversation.

At just 52, Blanchett is the Chaplin Award’s second-youngest recipient. Tom Hanks was also 52, but 38 days younger, when he was honored in 2009.

You can click on the image for the gala tickets.

Film at Lincoln Center is pleased to announce Cate Blanchett as the recipient of the organization’s 47th Chaplin Award, to be presented at a gala honoring her on April 25th at Lincoln Center’s Alice Tully Hall. The evening will be a joyful celebration of the actor’s incredible filmography, featuring notable speakers, film clips, and a career-spanning conversation culminating in the presentation of the Chaplin Award. The event promises to be an extraordinary recognition of an actor who has portrayed some of the most memorable characters committed to film, including Academy Award®-winning performances for Blue Jasmine and The Aviator.

Gala tickets are on sale now. Tribute-only tickets range in price from $250 – $750 and may be purchased here, with tickets for FLC Members starting at $200.  You can secure premium seating at the Chaplin Award Gala Tribute by purchasing Gala Dinner and Tribute tickets, starting at $3,000, here or by contacting us at galarsvp@filmlinc.org. All proceeds from the Chaplin Award Gala benefit Film at Lincoln Center’s programs and activities as a nonprofit organization.

“We are thrilled to welcome Cate Blanchett back to Film at Lincoln Center, where three of her films have previously screened as part of the New York Film Festival,” said Lesli Klainberg, Executive Director of Film at Lincoln Center. “Ms. Blanchett’s career includes extraordinary performances in films ranging from small independent efforts to major studio franchises and with some of the most renowned directors of our time. It is our privilege to dedicate an evening of celebration to her, and add one more accolade to her many well-deserved awards.”

“It’s a privilege to honor Ms. Blanchett at this year’s Chaplin Gala.” said Dan Stern, Board Chairman for Film at Lincoln Center. “Cate never ceases to amaze us with her stellar and wide-ranging performances and we’re excited to have her join us for this special evening on campus at Lincoln Center.”

The Chaplin Award Gala is the most important fundraising event of the year for Film at Lincoln Center, with all proceeds benefiting the organization in its mission to support the art and craft of cinema.

Cate Blanchett is an internationally acclaimed actor, producer, artistic director, humanitarian and dedicated member of the arts community. She is the co-Founder and Principal of film and television production company Dirty Films, alongside her partners Andrew Upton and Coco Francini. Most recently, Dirty Films executive produced Christos Nikou’s “Apples” which has been named one of the year’s best International Films by the National Board of Review. Dirty Films most recently produced the highly acclaimed Mrs. America for FX and Hulu, as well as the Netflix limited series STATELESS, which received a record breaking 18 Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts (AACTA) nominations, winning 13. Dirty Films has a first look deal with FX Productions for television projects, and with New Republic Pictures for feature films.

Blanchett is currently in preproduction for the Apple series, “Disclaimer,” created by Alfonso Cuarón. Most recently, Blanchett wrapped production on the upcoming Todd Field film, “Tar.” Prior to that, she wrapped production on Eli Roth’s Borderlands. She also recently completed work on Adam McKay’s film, Don’t Look Up, as well as Guillermo del Toro’s Nightmare Alley and Pinocchio. Additionally, it was recently announced that Blanchett will executive produce and star in Pedro Almodóvar’s first English-language feature film, “A Manual for Cleaning Women” as well as Warwick Thornton’s “The New Boy.” In 2015, she appeared in the title role of Carol, which she produced with Dirty Films and was directed by Todd Haynes. She received an Oscar, BAFTA, Golden Globe, Independent Spirit and SAG nomination for her performance. The same year, she appeared as Mary Mapes in Truth opposite Robert Redford. Blanchett has won Academy Awards for Best Actress on behalf of her performance as Jasmine in the film Blue Jasmine, and Best Supporting Actress for her portrayal of Katharine Hepburn in Martin Scorsese’s The Aviator. In 2008, Blanchett was nominated for two Academy Awards; one for Best Actress in Elizabeth: The Golden Age and one for Best Supporting Actress in I’m Not There. She was only the fifth actor in Academy history to be nominated in both acting categories in the same year. She also received dual SAG and BAFTA Award nominations for each role, and won a Golden Globe Award, Independent Spirit Award, several critics groups’ awards, and the Volpi Cup for Best Actress at the Venice Film Festival for I’m Not There.

She has created visual artworks with Julian Rosefeldt’s art film and installation, Manifesto, Marco Brambilla’s The Four Temperaments, and a video portrait of herself with David Rosetzky.

Blanchett served alongside Upton as the co-Artistic Director and co-CEO of the Sydney Theatre Company between 2008-2013, producing between 19 and 20 shows a year, which toured extensively nationally and internationally. Their most notable productions include; Tennessee Williams’ A Streetcar Named Desire, directed by Liv Ullman; Anton Chekhov’s Uncle Vanya directed by Tamas Ascher,  Steven Soderbergh’s Tot Mom; Benedict Andrew’s highly acclaimed productions of the War of the Roses, The Maids, Gross Und Klein, and the sminal adaptation of The Secret River by Neil Armfield which has since inspired the title-sharing ABC television series; Andrew Upton’s The Present, directed by John Crowley for which Blanchett earned a Tony Award nomination. Recently, Blanchett’s has appeard on stage on the controversial adaptation of Martin Crimp’s National Theatre production When We Have Sufficiently Tortured Each Other.

In 2010, Blanchett and Upton were awarded with the Green Globe Award for their Green Contribution at the Sydney Theatre Company, becoming one of the World’s Greenest Arts Organizations.

Blanchett is a Global Goodwill Ambassador for UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency and a lifetime member of the Australian Conservation Foundation, a strong supporter of the Actors Benevolent Fund, the SAG-AFTRA Foundation, the Australian Wildlife Conservancy, an AFI Ambassador and Patron of the Sydney Film Festival and the NIDA Foundation.

Blanchett holds a BFI Fellowship from the BFI London Film Festival and was awarded the Women in Film Crystal + Lucy Award for expanding the roles of women in film; the Crystal Award at the World Economic Forum in Davos in 2018 for her work with UNHCR and has received the 2018 Stanley Kubrick Award for Excellence in Film. She has been awarded the Centenary Medal of Service to Australian Society through Acting and has received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

In 2018, Blanchett served as Jury President of the 71st Cannes International Film Festival and she was the Jury President of the 77th Venice International Film Festival in 2020.

Blanchett holds Honorary Doctorates of Letters from the University of New South Wales, the University of Sydney, and Macquarie University. In recognition of her continued advocacy for the arts and her support of humanitarian and environmental causes, Blanchett has been awarded the Companion of the Order of Australia in the General Division; she was also awarded the Chevalier de l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres by the French Minister of Culture. She lives in the English countryside with her husband Andrew Upton, their four children, three dogs, twelve chickens and two pigs.

The annual Gala began in 1972 when it honored Charlie Chaplin, who returned to the U.S. from exile to accept the commendation. Since then, the Chaplin Award has been presented to many of the film industry’s most notable talents, including Alfred Hitchcock, Billy Wilder, Federico Fellini, Elizabeth Taylor, Bette Davis, James Stewart, Robert Altman, Martin Scorsese, Diane Keaton, Meryl Streep, Tom Hanks, Sidney Poitier, Barbra Streisand, Robert Redford, Morgan Freeman, Robert De Niro, Helen Mirren, and Spike Lee.

Film at Lincoln Center gives special thanks to the 47th Chaplin Award Gala Co-Chairs: Imelda and Peter Sobiloff and Daniel and Nanna Stern.

The Chaplin Award Gala will adhere to a comprehensive series of health and safety policies in coordination with state and city medical experts. Visit our health & safety page more information.

Premios Goya 2022

36th Goya Awards – Photocall – February 12th 2022

36th Goya Awards – Arrivals – February 12th 2022

36th Goya Awards – Stage – February 12th 2022

36th Goya Awards Portraits

36th Goya Awards Portraits – BTS

Source: THR, FLC

Cate Blanchett at Goya Awards 2022 – Photos & Videos; and New Podcast
Posted on
Feb 13, 2022

Cate Blanchett at Goya Awards 2022 – Photos & Videos; and New Podcast

Hola, Cate Blanchett fans! What a weekend we have!

The new episode, with Cate, of Talk Easy with Sam Fragoso has been released. You can listen below. Cate has been presented with the inaugural International Goya Award last night in Valencia, Spain. Pedro Almodóvar and Penélope Cruz presented the award. Check out the photos and videos from yesterday.

A Tea with Cate Blanchett

Goya Awards Ceremony

36th Goya Awards – Stage – February 12th 2022

https://twitter.com/AgustinAlmo/status/1492617527687528448

Photocall and Press Conference

Photocall

 Press Con

The text below is google translated but the source is linked at the end of this post.

Cate Blanchett, “speechless” for receiving the first International Goya

With a sweet “Hello!”, the actress Cate Blanchett has conquered the press that was waiting for her in the hall of the Palau de les Arts de València. Many of them welcomed her to the city that hosts, for the first time, the Goya ceremony.

She, on the other hand, “does not need introductions”, as Mariano Barroso, director of the Film Academy, has pointed out, who has accompanied her in the pose before the incessant shooting of the photographers. Then she, alone, elegantly, she has smiled at everyone dressed in a pink suit jacket and sneakers, before explaining that “I was speechless when they called me to tell me that they gave me the award.”

Cate Blanchett: “The Academy Award means that what I do has reached a different culture and audience”

It had raised maximum expectation and did not disappoint. Cate Blanchett starred this Saturday in a massive meeting with the media a few hours before receiving at the Palau de les Arts in Valencia the International Goya Award created this year by the Film Academy to “recognize personalities who contribute to cinema as an art that unites cultures and viewers of all the world”. In her case, she is also awarded for being “an actress who has played unforgettable characters that are already part of our memory and our present.” The Australian actress and producer was satisfied and excited, and she thanked the Film Academy for this recognition, which represents support for her career. “I come from Australia, where we have a small but quite powerful film industry, and being in Valencia receiving an award from the Spanish Academy means a lot to me,

In a room packed with journalists, cameras and photographers, the president of the Film Academy, Mariano Barroso , opened the event by welcoming Cate Blanchett, who was very grateful for the award. “When they called me to tell me that they were going to give me the International Goya, I was speechless, because Spanish cinema has had a fundamental influence on me, not only because of the work of Almodóvar and Amenábar, but also because of all cinema spoken in Spanish” he explained.

Winner of two Oscars, for Best Leading Actress for Woody Allen ‘s Blue Jasmine , and Best Supporting Actress for Martin Scorsese ‘s The Aviator. .In addition to three Golden Globes, three BAFTAs and three Screen Actors Guild Awards, Blanchett is one of the greatest talents in world cinema today. Some awards that represent recognition of his professional career. “I am old enough to say that I have a career, and I hope that it will continue to advance and take me in multiple directions. The creative path is full of deviations, it is not a straight line. If one decides to make applause the objective of the experience and ignore what work is, one is making a mistake. When you make a movie, a play, a book, how the audience is going to receive it is completely out of your control.”

Project with Almodovar

The actor spoke with enthusiasm about her upcoming projects, among which is Manual for cleaning women , by Pedro Almodóvar, an adaptation of the book by Lucía Berlín produced by El Deseo and Dirty Films, a company of which she is the founder and director together with Andrew Upton(with whom he chaired and artistically directed the Sydney Theater Company from 2008 to 2014. He had words of praise and admiration for the director from La Mancha. “I have known him for 20 years and we have been talking about working together for a long time. Now we have found a project that excites us both. There was another that did not materialize because it was not the right time, but now it is, “he revealed, adding that making this adaptation “means working with a person and a film culture that I love. It has always interested me and allows me to enter Pedro’s universe”.

This will be Almodóvar’s first film in English. “The key to working with him is that he is an excellent writer, an artist. All his cinema, everything he has created has a brutal influence. The script that he has proposed to me is unique, I had not seen something like it. Lucia Berlin’s stories can be represented cinematographically in very different ways, but Pedro’s point of view makes us go further, that we delve into concepts that have to do with addiction at different levels. We are going to talk about addictive relationships, but also about substance addiction, ”she recounted enthusiastically.

In addition, Blanchett currently has Nightmare Alley by Guillermo del Toro which she said “generates a great story behind each character that helps you a lot.”

Academies and festivals

Blanchett highlighted the important role of film academies and festivals today. “They have much more than nominees, red carpet and awards. There is work to support the industry and they are mentors in a process that has to look at the present and the future without fear. We find social movements such as Black Lives Matter or MeToo that must be understood and included. That inclusivity has to be adapted at all levels. If an academy does not understand these concepts and does not look to the future, it ends up being irrelevant, ”she said bluntly.

She also referenced the damage the pandemic has done to culture. “We have all missed going to a movie theater and all these types of cultural events that allow us to share experiences with complete strangers. We have missed it in the cinema, but in the theater even more”, she assured, although she acknowledged that the cinema was already “in danger” before the virus spread. “I had the hope, which I still do, that once we go out on the street we would really want to meet and we would do it in a movie theater. I don’t lose it.” But “we must be aware of what has happened: for 18 months we have been consuming on platforms,” she said, after considering that “the works should be seen as they have been planned. When we talk about creativity we talk about great ideas. The size of the screens doesn’t matter if the ideas are big”. The Australian actress and producer is currently involved in the pre-production of the series Disclaimer, directed by Alfonso Cuarón for AppleTV+, in which she will star and executive produce, and has just wrapped filming on Todd Field ‘s TAR , which she also produces and stars in, and Guillermo del Toro’s version of Pinocchio , for Netflix.

Arrival and red carpet

Source: La Vanguardia, Premios Goya

36th Goya Awards Press Conference + Photocall Photos
Posted on
Feb 12, 2022

36th Goya Awards Press Conference + Photocall Photos

Hi, everyone!

While we are waiting for Cate to receive the award from Premios Goya, here are some photos from press conference. There has been additional photos on the photocall folder too. Enjoy!

36th Goya Awards – Press Conference – February 12th 2022

36th Goya Awards – Photocall – February 12th 2022

First Look at Cate Blanchett at 36th Goya Awards Photocall
Posted on
Feb 12, 2022

First Look at Cate Blanchett at 36th Goya Awards Photocall

Great day, everyone!

Cate has graced Valencia, Spain with her presence. She did a press conference local time and posed for photos during photocall. Here’s our first look. We will be updating the gallery for more photos. You can watch the press conference below.

36th Goya Awards – Photocall – February 12th 2022

Press Conference

Photocall

Nightmare Alley available now to stream on HBO Max and Hulu
Posted on
Feb 5, 2022

Nightmare Alley available now to stream on HBO Max and Hulu

Great day, everyone!

Nightmare Alley is now available to stream on HBO Max and Hulu in the US. We have updated the gallery with some behind the scenes photos, FYC campaign posters, and screencaptures from the movie and behind the scene look. The black and white version of Nightmare Alley is also playing nationwide in the US and selected theatres in UK and Mexico. Check out some interviews as well.

Screencaptures

Behind the Scenes


4K Trailer Screencaptures

On the Red Carpet Presents: Nightmare Alley Behind the Scenes

FYC Campaign

Black and White version release

Interview

Star-Gazing: In Conversation With Cate Blanchett

It’s a strange feeling to stare into the void of a Zoom loading screen, waiting for a two-time Oscar winner to join the call. But that’s what I did one Sunday morning, counting the seconds until my interview with Cate Blanchett began. Her schedule was packed—plenty of news services wanted interviews regarding her recent roles in Nightmare Alley and Don’t Look Up, two movies considered likely to receive Oscars nominations—but she found the time for a half-hour audio call.

I take a deep but not quite calming breath as she joins; knowing time is limited, we briefly exchange greetings and begin. The first thing I want to know is how she was cast in Nightmare Alley, a film noir about the rise and fall of Stan Carlisle, a carnival mentalist in 1940s America. In the movie, Blanchett plays Dr. Lilith Ritter, a cunning psychologist who seems to partner with Stan, but has an agenda of her own.

She tells me that she and director Guillermo del Toro had previously spoken about working on a project together; while that original project never bore fruit, he kept her in mind when it came time to cast Nightmare Alley. “I read the script, and was blown away by it, because it felt so distinct and obviously was drawing from deep recesses of not only the novel,” she says (referring to the 1946 novel by William Lindsay Gresham which the movie adapts), “but things that Guillermo and [co-writer] Kim Morgan had been thinking about for a long time.” I agree with her, saying that the movie’s clearly inspired by del Toro’s personal interests, such as his fondness for filming weird things in jars.

Laughing, she tells me that she and del Toro have a shared love of the horror genre—“I was gripped by that all through my adolescence…I now can’t watch a horror movie without peeing my pants”. But Nightmare Alley doesn’t just rely on the sinister visuals that del Toro is often associated with; rather, halfway through the film the setting shifts from a seedy, exploitative carnival to the elegant ballrooms and offices of New York. While beautiful, it’s ultimately an equally dark and destructive realm—“there’s blood in the panels of those walls,” Blanchett says of that setting.

So what makes film noir relevant as a genre these days? There are so many archetypes of the genre that can be used in a sloppy way, Blanchett notes, and a mere replica of its conventions can just end up being a “cinematic history lesson”. But what del Toro has done is to harness the tropes of the genre—characters haunted by a dark past, spaces that are claustrophobic and confining—and show how they remain pertinent to the psychology of the modern world.

Gresham’s novel was previously adapted as a black-and-white film in 1947 by director Edmund Goulding, and while Blanchett likes the film and had seen it prior to signing on to this project, she does point out a limitation in its storytelling. For her, the 1947 adaptation’s characterization of Dr. Ritter felt “hazy”, less memorable than some of its other components—but this, in a way, was useful.

Without the fear of being held back by Dr. Ritter’s portrayal in the previous version, she could put her own spin on the character. “She had to be a little Sphinx-like, in the sense that she’s asking the question, but you sense that there’s a power and weight of experience behind those questions,” she says. Del Toro prepared a detailed biography for the character, which Blanchett tells me was headed by a quote from Hamlet: “I am very proud, revengeful, ambitious, with more offences at my beck than I have thoughts to put them in, imagination to give them shape, or time to act them in”.

However, because she knew that to explicitly show her character’s past would be saying too much, the movie only hints at her true self and history. Blanchett especially praises the film’s production design, by Tamara Deverell, as a means of implying Dr. Ritter’s true nature—“I’ve never walked onto a set that so absolutely represented the character I was playing”. Ultimately, she didn’t want the character to be a stereotypical femme fatale, who sought to destroy men “simply because”; rather, Dr. Ritter had been physically and mentally scarred by a cruel world, and was trying to bring about a twisted form of justice.

But that goal wouldn’t be achieved without Stan Carlisle, played by Bradley Cooper, who her character simultaneously works with and undermines. “I adore Bradley”, she says, as an actor as well as a producer and director. They found that they had similar rhythms as actors, so that performing alongside him was enjoyable even in the darkest and most complex scenes—“it’s a dance of death…it’s a matador and a bull,” she says of their characters’ dynamics.

On the topic of the actor’s craft, does she see acting more as telling the truth or telling lies? She reflects on the question, telling me that for her, ultimately, “acting is revealing”. The things revealed can range from being pleasant to repulsive—“but it’s never, ever telling an audience what to think…I suppose that’s what art is, isn’t it? It does more and resonates more than what it seems to do on the surface.” Maybe that’s why some people think that art and acting is deception, she says.

With this film and Don’t Look Up (a disaster movie by Adam McKay that satirizes the inaction and misinformation surrounding the climate crisis) speaking to the uncertainty of the modern world, I ask her what it’s like to try and make sense of truth in a time where nothing seems to be known. She agrees that it’s become difficult to hunt the truth out, to get at the things that are foundational to a democracy. “I feel for students at the moment,” she says, wondering when it was that truth became degraded into nothing more than competing information sources—in the last six years? since the Cold War? “Certainly in the last four years, that word itself has been so destroyed”.

As for the function of art in general, she says, “I don’t think art is political; it’s wilfully not”. Whereas politics focuses on the here and now, artists have the freedom to look backwards or forwards in time, such as how del Toro’s film uses the 1940s to reflect modern cultural questions back at us. For her, art is a provocation, a space for dangerous ideas: “art is a much more irresponsible medium—it has to be”.

This leads the conversation to current affairs, specifically the experience of making movies during COVID–apart from her two aforementioned projects, last year she finished filming TÁR, a drama film by Todd Field, and is about to begin filming Disclaimer, a seven-part series by Alfonso Cuaron, as well as an adaptation of Lucia Berlin’s short stories, directed by Pedro Almodóvar, next year. Noting the importance of how stories and films provided escapism amidst the pandemic’s stresses, Blanchett tells me that she felt privileged to be part of the film industry. However, she also notes that “there are millions of out-of-work performers, particularly in the live performing arts” who’ve not been as lucky as her and have struggled because of the pandemic.

Blanchett also stresses that the film industry also hasn’t fully processed other key cultural moments such as Black Lives Matter or MeToo, and the need to address these systemic issues in an uncompromising way. “The pandemic revealed just how broken everything was,” she concludes this train of thought by saying, “as you put the pieces back together, the upside is that there’s an understood necessity in our industry to fix it.”

My final question for her is to ask, on behalf of our readers (and myself), for any film recommendations she might have. She replies that while she hasn’t been able to see anything in a cinema yet, she rewatched the 1981 TV miniseries adapting the novel Brideshead Revisited, singling out Jeremy Irons’ performance for particular praise. More recent works she singles out for praise include Long Day’s Journey Into Night, by Bi Gan—recommended to her by her son—the movies of Josephine Decker and Lucrecia Martel, and Pedro Almodóvar’s Parallel Mothers. It’s clear from how she speaks that these are movies she genuinely feels passionate about.

With that, she answers my final question—or so I assume. Because, later that day, she messages me with one final recommendation: “The other film to see is RED ROCKET. Unforgettable”.

Note: We have added the countries where the black and white version of Nightmare Alley is released.

Source: Nightmare Alley, Cherwell

 

Cate Blanchett to co-host a podcast; and more updates
Posted on
Feb 3, 2022

Cate Blanchett to co-host a podcast; and more updates

Hi, everyone!

Cate will be co-hosting an Audible podcast. She is one of the actors included in British Vogue’s 25 of the world’s talked about stars. There’s also an accompanying video interview for the photoshoot. We have added some behind the scene photos from Don’t Look Up.

Cate Blanchett to Co-host a Climate Change Podcast At Audible

Click image for higher resolution

Audible has commissioned a new original podcast, Climate of Change with Cate Blanchett and Danny Kennedy.

Co-created and co-hosted by multi award-winning actor, producer and environmental advocate, Cate Blanchett and climate entrepreneur and activist, Danny Kennedy, it will feature “out-of-the-box thinkers”, innovators and high-profile guests, who will be announced at a later date.

Two seasons have been commissioned in the deal between Audible and Blanchett’s Dirty Films (in association with StoryHunter), with the first series set to launch globally this April ahead of Earth Day.

The collaboration marks the first time that Cate Blanchett and Danny Kennedy will create and host a podcast together, as well as Audible’s first major original climate change podcast series.

Climate of Change sees the two long-term friends explore despair, optimism and hope in the face of environmental change.

From women-led energy solutions in Uganda, to a Navajo solar farm in the Arizona desert, to ideas that could transform the global fashion industry; Cate and Danny will tell stories of ingenuity and resilience.

Cate and Danny interview guests along the way, discussing the biggest challenges humankind face and the ground-breaking work being done to tackle the crisis.

Some of the world’s leading authors and thought leaders in the green economy, behaviour change and sustainability will feature, as well as grass-roots innovators who are making a positive impact on their local communities by creating clean energy solutions.

The exclusive soundtrack to the podcast is by Grammy Award-winning electronic artist Imogen Heap.

Cate Blanchett, Partner, Dirty Films, said: “This podcast is a joyous extension of a long-standing friendship that all of us at Dirty Films have had with the wonderful Danny Kennedy.

“Danny’s knowledge about and passion for climate solutions is infectious, and our experience developing this project with the folks at StoryHunter for Audible has been a shot in the arm – and has gone a long way to tempering our eco-anxiety.

“We hope that our listeners enjoy hearing the conversations as much as we have enjoyed having them.”

Aurelie De Troyer, Senior Vice President of International English Content at Audible, added: “We are thrilled to be working on such an exciting and important series as Climate of Change.

“Podcasts are the perfect vehicle to educate and raise awareness of important issues and it’s an honour to collaborate with the extremely talented Cate and Danny on their first podcast.

“We have been blown away by the passion for this project from the team at Dirty Films and StoryHunter and we know this will be something special.”

Vogue UK 2022 Hollywood Portfolio

Screencaptures

Tell us about your first ever audition.

“It was for the church musical. I got the part of Mr Worldly Wiseman. We performed at a couple of shopping centres and I thought I’d made it.”

What is the best piece of advice you’ve ever been given?

“Something I tell my children, which is to stay out of the sun.”

Click image for higher resolution:

Don’t Look Up Behind the Scenes


Source: Vogue UK, Podcasting Today

Femme fatale of ‘Nightmare Alley’; and Nightmare Alley and 032c Magazine Photos
Posted on
Dec 21, 2021

Femme fatale of ‘Nightmare Alley’; and Nightmare Alley and 032c Magazine Photos

Hello, blanchetters!

Another photo from 032c Magazine photoshoot has been released. We have also added some HQ posters, behind the scenes, and stills from Nightmare Alley on our gallery. Associated Press published an interview with Cate and Guillermo del Toro.

032c Magazine

Riccardo Tisci himself is in charge of the creative direction of the shooting, and Mart & Marcus, a world-famous photographer, is in charge of the shooting. Cate Blanchett has an overwhelming presence in Burberry’s Spring / Summer 2022 pre-collection and iconic trench coat. This shoot was made possible by the long-standing relationship between Riccardo Tisci and Cate Blanchett, Mart & Marcus. In the paper, Riccardo Tisci talks about how he became Burberry’s chief creative officer.

Click the image for higher resolution and more photos:

Nightmare Alley posters, stills, and behind the scene photos by Kerry Hayes

Poster

Behind the scenes
Stills
POTENTIAL SPOILER in the interview below is highlighted in blue.

Blanchett, del Toro on the femme fatale of ‘Nightmare Alley’

With a touch of Barbara Stanwyck, a sumptuous Art Deco office and a deadly shade of crimson lipstick, Cate Blanchett plays a femme fatale in Guillermo del Toro’s “Nightmare Alley” with cunning embrace and subversion of the film noir archetype.

If “Nightmare Alley” is del Toro’s lushly composed love letter to noir, the movie’s pulpy heart is in Blanchett’s conniving psychiatrist Lilith Ritter. She doesn’t enter the film until halfway through, when Bradley Cooper’s carnival huckster, Stan, catches her eye in his nightclub mind-reading act, and the two begin scheming together. But when she does turn up, Blanchett shifts the film’s fable-like frequency, conjuring deeper shades of mystery from the movie’s rich tapestry of shadow and fate.

“We tailored the part for her, but she fit in those clothes on the first try,” says del Toro.

In period films like “Carol,” “The Good German” and “The Aviator,” Blanchett has often evoked a classical kind of mid-century movie stardom. But in “Nightmare Alley,” an adaptation of the ’40s novel first made into Edmund Golding’s well-regarded 1947 film (currently streaming on the Criterion Channel), Blanchett slides into one of the movies’ most iconic types by trading less on her character’s seductiveness than on her razor-sharp intellect.

“What I thought was timely and dangerous about this story was it’s an exploration of the truth,” Blanchett said in an interview from Brighton, England. “Playing such a deliberately mysterious and ambiguous character I found really challenging because you have to know there’s a lot going on, but you’re never invited into exactly what she’s thinking.”

It’s one of two roles this December for Blanchett that revolve centrally around American deception and disinformation. There’s “Nightmare Alley,” currently in theaters, and Adam McKay’s “Don’t Look Up,” which arrives Friday on Netflix. In the latter, she plays a TV morning news anchor who cheerfully steers the news away from an impending asteroid doomsday and toward lighter subjects — like the sex appeal of Leonardo DiCaprio’s scientist.

There may be something timeless about Blanchett in “Nightmare Alley,” but to her, both films are characterized by their timeliness.

“It was such a privilege to be on a film set in this particular point in human history,” Blanchett says. “One should always be alive to the time in which what you’re making is going to be viewed. I never felt that more profoundly than making these two films.”

Blanchett and del Toro had discussed various projects for years but came together for the first time on “Nightmare Alley.” (She also voices a role in the director’s upcoming stop-motion animated “Pinocchio” — another film about truth telling.)

Del Toro, who calls his kinship with author James M. Cain “profound,” had long pined to pay tribute to noir. His affection for the genre runs deep. In his previous film, the best-picture Oscar-winner “The Shape of Water,” del Toro explicitly referenced Otto Preminger’s “Fallen Angel.” An avid collector, del Toro calls the portrait that hangs in Preminger’s “Laura” “the one prop I would kill to own.”

“I read all of (Raymond) Chandler right before I married,” says del Toro. “I’m not sure why.”

Del Toro scripted “Nightmare Alley” with film critic Kim Morgan, whom he wed earlier this year. His taste in noir leans toward seedy, rather than the more elegant varieties, and films that inhabit an audacious psychology.

“I like these characters, like Bette Davis in ‘Beyond the Forest,’ who are too smart for their environment,” he says. “I root for them not because I think they do things that are good but because I agree that they are left without recourse in what seems like a rigged game. That’s the noir that I find interesting.”

One touchstone for “Nightmare Alley” was 1949’s “Too Late for Tears,” a nasty noir starring Lizabeth Scott as a housewife who finds a bag full of cash. (Del Toro and Morgan screened it recently on TCM.) Tasting a chance for freedom from her husband and more, Scott’s character clings to the money. Del Toro and Morgan envisioned Lilith similarly as operating within a male-controlled society.

“Frankly, it’s the character I was completely passionate about creating with Cate,” he says. “She’s almost like an avenger. We said: Whatever happened to her in the past, she’s sort of righting the wrongs.

To Blanchett, the term femme fatale suggests a diabolical woman — “like a siren seeking to draw the male character onto the rocks to destroy them for no reason apart from they have diabolical urges.”

Blanchett and del Toro instead played with subtle gradations in Lilith’s motives. Blanchett thought one line of dialogue was too straightforward, and del Toro agreed in cutting it. But he still quotes the speech a little ruefully: “Do you know what it is for a woman like me to grow up in a town where the smartest man is just a stupid beast?”

“Even though there’s nothing explicit that Lilith says about her background, there’s a sense that she’s damaged goods from the system, that she wants to burn down and she’s going to use Stan to do it,” says Blanchett. “Her faith in him and the men who run the system is nonexistent.”

Del Toro shot Blanchett’s scenes with Cooper, he says, like three 5-10-minute miniature plays. Inside Lilith’s ornate, wood-paneled office, the two con artists dance — a shifting drama told through blocking and camera movement. It’s a chess game that Lilith, inevitably, will win.

Source: PR Times, AP

Cate Blanchett AACTA International Nomination; 032c Magazine Photos; & New Interview and Nightmare Alley Featurette
Posted on
Dec 19, 2021

Cate Blanchett AACTA International Nomination; 032c Magazine Photos; & New Interview and Nightmare Alley Featurette

Hi, Blanchett fans!

Cate has been nominated at the AACTA International for her performance in Don’t Look Up. A new Nightmare Alley featurette has been released. Check out some of the photos from 032C photoshoot below.

AACTA International Nomination

The 2021 AACTA International Awards will be presented virtually at 7 a.m. AEDT on Thursday, Jan. 27 (12 p.m. PT on Wednesday January 26).

Nightmare Alley Featurette

Screencaptures

A double dose of the great Cate for the holidays

This morning I had the opportunity to interview Cate Blanchett, whose latest film Nightmare Alley opens today. I got to see that in a packed preview screening earlier this month at the spectacular Academy Museum theater and it looked stunning (not sure howI would have reviewed its considerable visual glories off a link). I brought up the fact that it is so great to see this Guillermo del Toro film opening exclusively in theaters, and it is great to see people going back, however cautiously.

“It is crazy times but I doubt there is going to be a non-crazy time in the near future,” she said. “I really think people, well I can speak for myself, but I think the one thing I missed, even though we are not out of the woods yet, the one thing I missed in the epicenter of the pandemic was gathering in the dark with strangers, because it does add to the experience when other people you don’t know are all joined in that experience.”

Blanchett had high praise for her director, working with del Toro for the first time, saying, “Guillermo is a singular filmmaking creature. There is no one like him making movies.” This two-time Oscar winner has obviously worked with a lot of great directors, so that is saying something.

Nightmare Alley is a delicious period film noir in which the psychiatrist she portrays goes toe to toe on the dark side with a devious Bradley Cooper in this remake of the 1947 Tyrone Power classic and reimagining of the controversial book that came out in 1946. It is a film that has strong entertainment value but also a timely message. In some ways you could say, even though this film is set in 1939 and early ’40s, it talks about things Blanchett thinks are a global problem today, including the Big Lie.

“It is a big problem today, this relationship with the truth, and something that obviously the film deals with absolutely is the most dangerous part is when the liar starts to believe the lie,” she said. “It is sort of relevant to the old Soviet era, the systems we labored under, where we know they are lying, they know that we know and don’t give a damn, and we don’t give a damn either…I think it is very nightmarish.”

Usually film noir is in black and white, but this was shot in color. However, as we were chatting this morning I told Blanchett, who was Zooming in from England, that it was just announced there will be a special black-and-white version of the movie released to select theaters in January. I for one can’t wait. “Guillermo talked about it when we were shooting saying ‘Oh maybe this should be in black and white but they’ll kill me,’ but it is so great they finally are getting to do that,” she said. “I don’t enjoy watching myself on screen, but I loved watching this movie so I will queue up and buy a ticket.”

Blanchett not only has Nightmare Alley this holiday season, but also the hilarious, timely and pertinent Don’t Look Up, the all-star Adam McKay comedy in theaters and hitting Netflix next week. The pic uses the premise of an impending comet about to destroy Earth as a wry comment on the lack of urgency by many for the distinct dangers of climate change.

I wondered if she was now picking movies like these two that not only have great entertainment value, but also have something important to say; both films were nominated this week for Best Picture by the Critics Choice Association. “It is very rare that two movies come along like this in relatively quick succession and you get to be a part of it,” she said. “Both of them have such exceptional casts, with two incredibly distinctive directorial voices, and you’ve got all of these people working at the top of their game in films that deal with very contemporary relevant issues but doing it in a way through allegory and metaphor and satire, so that there’s no agitprop preaching quality to either film at all. They are there to hold the audience’s hand and entertain them and hopefully leave them feeling more deeply, connecting maybe. It is very rare. I feel pretty blessed to have been a small part of both.”

032c Magazine

Source: Variety, Deadline

Nightmare Alley and Don’t Look Up Updates
Posted on
Dec 15, 2021

Nightmare Alley and Don’t Look Up Updates

Hi, blanchetters!

We’ve made some updates with the gallery — screencaptures, behind the scenes, stills, FYC campaigns for both Nightmare Alley and Don’t Look Up have been added to their respective folders. There’s also new featurette and clips released as we are nearing the US release (December 17th) of Nightmare Alley. Check them below.

Cate on GMA

According to ABC News Public Relations Cate is set to appear on Good Morning America on December 17th as part of the promotion for Nightmare Alley.

Friday, Dec. 17—Actress Marisa Tomei (“Spider-Man No Way Home”); actress Cate Blanchett (“Nightmare Alley”); 12 Days of Cookies with Trisha Yearwood

Nightmare Alley Updates

HBO First Look: Nightmare Alley which is a 12-minute behind the scene look on the Guillermo Del Toro’s Nightmare Alley is now available on HBO Max in the US. Here’s Cate’s commentary and Lilith behind the scenes/clips.

Screencaptures

Behind the scenes

Stills

Critics Choice and Screen Actors Guild Awards FYC Campaign

 

Cate has been nominated for Best Supporting Actress from two different critics associations for her portrayal of Dr. Lilith Ritter

Don’t Look Up News

The cast of Don’t Look Up has been nominated for Best Acting Ensemble in the 27th annual Critics Choice Awards. The ceremony will be held on Sunday, January 9, 2022 and will be broadcast live on The CW television network.

BEST ACTING ENSEMBLE

Belfast

Don’t Look Up

The Harder They Fall

Licorice Pizza

The Power of the Dog

West Side Story

Source: ABC, Critics Choice