Category: Videos

Cate Blanchett on Elle Spain for Sì Fiori + Updates

Cate Blanchett on Elle Spain for Sì Fiori + Updates

Hey Blanchetters!

Time for another Sì Fiori promotional interview with Cate Blanchett. This time on the latest issue of Elle Spain. We also updated few contents from Armani Beauty in the gallery. Take a look below and enjoy!





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Cate Blanchett for Beauty Papers magazine VII Glamour issue

Cate Blanchett for Beauty Papers magazine VII Glamour issue

Hey Blanchetters!!

Time for a new interview with Cate Blanchett! She is in the cover of Beauty Papers magazine VII Glamour issue released today. Cate Blanchett stars as American artists Bruce Nauman and Andy Warhol in a short video and photoshoot for the magazine.
If you can, make sure you buy a copy!

Performance: Cate Blanchett

[…] Undeniably beautiful, yet she is too intelligent, too complex and too layered to be shoved into an easy package. It is this complexity that makes her arguably the best of her generation. She leapt to international fame with regal period excess in Elizabeth, progressed through waspish 1950s bourgeois in The Talented Mr Ripley and excelled with ethereal elvish mystery in The Lord of the Rings. She has worked with directors such as Todd Haynes, Sally Potter, Jim Jarmusch and Martin Scorsese on comedies, dramas, thrillers and period pieces. She is an Australian who can seem faultlessly Scottish, Russian, American or British. Blanchett has won Oscars for Blue Jasmine and The Aviator, been nominated for four others, and notched up three Golden Globes. She is at the top of her game, yet not afraid to be experimental, as her collaboration with artist Julian Rosefeldt in 2015 demonstrated. Away from the stage and the screen, she is also a UNHCR Global Goodwill Ambassador, working on human rights projects.

Many of her roles have played with or unpicked the image of beauty. The mature lesbian chic of Carol, the disintegrating edges of Jasmine in Blue Jasmine or the confused attraction of Sheba in Notes on a Scandal all highlight the fact that there is something beyond perfect hair, clothes and sex appeal. Blanchett truthfully comes across as a woman of substance.

Francesca Gavin: Your career grew out of theatre and you worked with the Sydney Theatre Company for a long period, more recently working on Broadway and in London. Are you still attracted to working on the stage? Which aspects of your stage experiences do you think have had the most influence on your approach to acting and creating?

Cate Blanchett: Now that is a question and a half… My time as co-artistic director of the Sydney Theatre Company was probably the most formative regenerative period of my career thus far. A homecoming of sorts – to the rich and hungry artistic community from which I sprang. But apart from the enormous responsibility for the fiscal and creative health of the company and indeed fostering the careers of emerging and mid-career artists, Andrew [Upton, husband] and I were placed into a dynamic national creative conversation. This was so very galvanising. For better or worse, one still has to fight in Australia for the basic notion that the arts should be available and central to people’s lives. But perhaps this is rapidly becoming a global issue. Wasn’t it Winston Churchill who refused to cut arts funding during the war as an austerity measure saying, ‘Then what are we fighting for?’ In spite of all the talent my country possesses, there is still a profound lack of confidence in our artistic output. That was in large part why we made it our mission to tour the company’s work internationally.

FG: How do you approach finding such a breadth of roles? Variety feels something central to your choices.

CB: Oh yes, variety is very much the spice of my life… but I’m beginning to think about repetition much more. When I say that, I mean in order to go more deeply into things – not always looking for the next and the new. Perhaps part of why I’m an actor is that I’m far more interested in the thoughts, feelings and experiences of others than of my own – mine are a tad boring. I’m sure there are a myriad of people who would back me up there! But to try to answer your question… my choices have always been made on instinct. And, since having children, around school holidays.

FG: What do you find interesting about the process of transformation – visually, but also internally and psychologically – when you become different characters?

CB: All I ever see is myself. Which bores me rigid. Transformation is not a focus for me. The story is – do I want to be part of this conversation? Do I have anything to offer it? But in terms of character – which is always the point of entry for me in a project – I am very text-based. The rhythm of good writing. The tempo of a character as well as what they choose not to say. Often, what someone says is a smokescreen to what they actually think or feel. Who does a character think they are as opposed to who they actually might be.

FG: What are your feelings about the pressures that Hollywood presents to women in terms of their looks?

CB: Oh, those boring pressures are age-old and eternal. Men feel them too, I’m sure, but the reaction to this manifests itself in different ways. But I feel there is a healthy interest in people’s points of difference, their uniqueness, which means performers are stepping into a space of boldly finding their own non-cookie-cutter way of doing ‘their thang’. Women, in particular, are collectively now prizing their worth and their individuality. I think that extends to challenging the male gaze which has run mainstream cinema for so long. Nothing wrong with a male gaze – it’s just mind-numbingly boring and exclusive if other perspectives are suffocated.

FG: Some of the characters you have played on screen – for example, Jasmine in Blue Jasmine – are very conscious of their perceived image. What have you found interesting about that sense of self-preoccupation?

CB: I’m always saying yes, perhaps to my own detriment. I just get excited by fabulous ideas – and the prospect of nutting out a world and sets of experiences or theories I have no present knowledge of. The only hard part about that for me is the doing of it. I’m a little on the shy side. Kaboom! Not all actors are exhibitionists.

FG: What is your definition of glamour?

CB: Glamour shines, it’s effortless and unselfconscious and damn sexy. It’s also quite unattainable. Something to reach for. It probably also involves brushing one’s hair?

FG: You have played some incredibly strong, powerful proto-feminist women, from Elizabeth to Katharine Hepburn. What do you like about these individuals who are either in positions of power or innately powerful? To what extent do you feel that is a reflection of yourself?

CB: If there is any similarity between characters I’ve played on film and myself it’s utterly unintentional. But when you say powerful, what do you mean exactly? That these women have a strong impact on the narrative? They know and speak their minds? Because a woman in a position of power is not an interesting enough byline for a film in and of itself. Often in the past, producers have been fascinated by certain so-called powerful women in history, women who have made an impact on events, on the world around them, broken new ground, women who are complicated and conflicted. But then haven’t bothered to find a reason to make a film about them. Having had the imagination to locate them in a riveting story that is more than their character alone. The story is the thing. The perspective. Interesting ‘powerful’ male characters have more often than not been encased in a great ripping story.

FG: What are your feelings about the representation and limitations of gender?

CB: I’ve been reading Maggie Nelson lately, who is fascinating and revelatory on the subject of gender binary thinking. She talks about gender as not being volunteerism, about it not being performative. She referenced Judith Butler about dealing with the question of how do we rework the trap we are all inevitably in. I’m fascinated right now with how one turns the inclusive nature of feminism, female equality, from downfall to unassailable strength. How one claims it without allowing it to be weaponised…It’s why I wanted to be in Martin Crimp’s play with Katie Mitchell [When We Have Sufficiently Tortured Each Other]. To investigate all this ‘stuff’.

FG: What are your feelings about make-up and costume? Do you find them inspiring elements in your process of creation?

CB: I adore make-up and costume. The most delicate and robust creative time on any project happens in wardrobe fitting and in the make-up business. And so very many of those elastic tossing-ideas-around and trying-things-out sessions have been with Morag [Ross]. Her eye and her sense of risk are very, very inspiring.

FG: Your job is to constantly embody other people. How do you maintain your sense of self?

CB: My sense of self, if I have one, is non-linear and utterly elastic. And honestly, apart from owning my fuck-ups and missteps, of which there are many, I try to think about myself as little as possible. There is just too much else to be concerned about in the world right now. The void under the Thwaites Glacier? The Dakota Pipeline, anyone? Australia’s offshore detention horrors…?

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Cate Blanchett for Giorgio Armani: New Interview and Documentary

Cate Blanchett for Giorgio Armani: New Interview and Documentary

Good morning Blanchetters! The collaboration between Cate and Mr. Armani is bearing fruits into the new year, with lovely new contents. At the end of 2018 the fashion maison released a new set of interviews by the title What is Armani for you?


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Few day ago Armani releaved that a new documentary called Armani Privè: A View Beyond was set to premiere on the italian channel Sky Arte on January 16 (Italian Title: Armani Privè – Lo sguardo oltre)

Here is the trailer:


Both videos were recored is September when Cate attended the Milan Fashion Week. Pictures in the gallery here
Talking about Giorgio Armani, Armani Beauty has started releasing the new spring commercials these days: according to online stores the new fragrance is called Sì Fiori Eau de Parfum. Sources: 1, 2

News: Magazine Scans+Interviews + Behind the Scene Picture + More

News: Magazine Scans+Interviews + Behind the Scene Picture + More

Hello Blanchetters!

It has been a quiet week considering how busy Cate has been for the last few weeks. Today we are posting content released during the week; first IndieWire released an interview with greek director Yorgos Lanthimos, who confessed Cate has reached out and wants to work with him. Maybe this is Cate’s next big collaboration? We’ll see! Meanwhile, here’s a fragment of the interview:

But there’s one major actor who has been eager to work with Lanthimos long before he made inroads to English-language productions. “Cate Blanchett was the first one that reached out,” Lanthimos said, in an interview with IndieWire from New York, while promoting the upcoming release of “The Favourite” and recalling the immediate aftermath of “Dogtooth.” “I’m still in contact with Cate, and we are trying to do something together.”
Blanchett has yet to speak publicly of her affinity for Lanthimos’ work, and representatives for the actress declined to comment. Nevertheless, a collaboration with Lanthimos would be a natural gamble for the A-list performer, whose stable of auteur collaborators includes Woody Allen, Terrence Malick, Todd Haynes, and Martin Scorsese. Lanthimos and Blanchett have overlapped at festivals in recent years: “The Lobster” was in competition at Cannes the same year as Haynes’ “Carol,” and Blanchett was spotted at the Venice International Film Festival premiere of “The Favourite” in late August.
“I’ve been so fortunate to work with great directors,” she told IndieWire in 2013. “In the end, I think that’s driving the conversation.”
Lanthimos added that Weisz reached out to him shortly after he heard from Blanchett — and as the cast of “The Favourite” proves, they weren’t the only actresses drawn to his work. “It was mostly women who reached out,” he said. “I don’t know what that says about my work, the work they were getting, or about male actors.” Regardless, he welcomed them into his domain. “It is true that the way the system works, you need name actors in order to put things together when you make English-language films,” he said. “I took great care in making sure that all these people reaching out wanted to be a part of it because of what the work was, not because something different might happen, and that they actually appreciated the work.”

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While promoting IWC watches in Shanghai last week, Cate gave this interview to Fashion Ifeng where she talks about female and male perspectives in fashion and in cinema.

We have also added magazine scans from Harper’s Bazaar Taiwan, i Look Magazine and Cine Premiere Mexico to our Gallery and a little behind the scenes picture from “The House with a Clock in Its Walls” set, published by Loop Weekly. Enjoy!

“The House with a Clock in Its Walls” – DVD release date and features +Trailer, Still and Interviews

“The House with a Clock in Its Walls” – DVD release date and features +Trailer, Still and Interviews

Hello Everyone!

The release date for “The House with a Clock in its Walls” DVD has been announced, it will be out in Digital on November 27 and in Blu-ray & DVD on December 18.

Among the news of the DVD release date, DVDActive.com has published the details of the DVD content, with a lot of extra material included. Take a look!

Further Details:
Universal Pictures Home Entertainment has announced the Blu-ray Combo Pack (BD/DVD/Digital HD), 4K Ultra HD (4K UHD/BD/Digital HD), and DVD releases of Eli Roth’s The House with a Clock in its Walls.

Blu-ray exclusive extras will include:
Warlocks and Witches – Go behind the scenes with the enchanting cast of The House with a Clock in Its Walls:
Finding Lewis – A look at the casting of Owen Vaccaro
Jack’s Magical Journey – A look at the unique dynamism and magic that Jack Black brings to the character of Jonathan Barnavelt
The Great Cate – The cast discuss Cate Blanchett’s wonderful performance as Florence Zimmerman
[i]The Terrifying Isaac Izard – Watch Kyle MacLachlan’s creepy evolution from living icon to undead-warlock
Movie Magic:
The Ultimate Haunted House – Join filmmakers for a guided tour through the incredible house at the center of the film
Automatons Attack – A behind-the-scenes look at the mechanical horrors involved in this chilling sequence
Pumpkin Puke – Behind the scenes with the cast and an army of spooky, snarling, vomiting pumpkins
Moving Pieces – Filmmakers and cast discuss the amazing clock room set
Baby Jack – A behind-the-scenes look at the creepy Baby Jack sequence
Tick Tock: Bringing the Book to Life – Filmmakers discuss how they adapted the book for the big screen
Eli Roth: Director’s Journals – Director Eli Roth takes viewers behind the scenes:
Candler Mansion
Newnan, GA
The Chair
Comrade Ivan
New Zebedee Elementary
Wrap Day
Owen Goes Behind the Scenes – Armed with his own camera, Owen guides viewers on his own journey behind-the-scenes of the movie:
Around the Set
Behind the Camera
The Big Interview
Downtime on Set
[i]Theme Song Challenge – Eli Roth and the cast are challenged to come up with a theme song for the film
Do You Know Jack Black? – The cast compete with each other to see who knows Jack Black the best
Abracadabra! – Eli Roth performs a magic trick for Owen Vaccaro
Jack Black’s Greatest Fear – Eli Roth and Owen Vaccaro play a prank on Jack Black
The Mighty Wurlitzer – Composer Nathan Barr discusses how he created the film’s unique and distinct score

The other extras, which will be included on 4K UHD, BD, and DVD discs, include:
Alternate Opening and Ending with Commentary by Director Eli Roth and Actor Jack Black available
Deleted Scenes with Commentary by Director Eli Roth and Actor Jack Black available
More Books, Please
A Horrible Practical Joke
Tarby Ditches Lewis
Eat Up
Play for Him
Get Out of the Way
Time Is of the Essence
The Clock That Never Breaks
12 Minutes to Go
Gag Reel
Feature Commentary with Director Eli Roth and Actor Jack Black

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Even when we have news on the DVD release date already, the movie is still playing around the globe, meaning that new material is still coming out. We have a new Chinese trailer, new interviews and we have added three posters and stills from the movie to our gallery. Enjoy!

Click on the image to download the HQ version available in the gallery


Click on the image to download the HQ version available in the gallery


UPDATE: one more video and a know promotional clip in a different size. Enjoy!

Rome Film Festival – Additional videos

Rome Film Festival  – Additional videos

Hello Everyone!

Today we are bringing more videos from “The House with a Clock in Its Walls” premiere at the Rome Film Festival from last friday. Enjoy!


Wirtschaft

Virgilio

Rai

Rai masterclass

SMTV san marino

Sky news