Don’t Look Up Updates
Posted on
Jan 14, 2022

Don’t Look Up Updates

Hello!

Here are some updates on Don’t Look Up. Listen to the third episode of The Last Movie Ever Made: The Don’t Look Up podcast and watch Seriously Funny which features some behind the scenes look on the movie. Enjoy!

The Last Movie Ever Made and Seriously Funny

The discussion about Daily Rip with commentary from Cate begins at 37:40

https://open.spotify.com/episode/5SgkuDdkORtuGhfmBYKKWp?si=we821gKBSpWdbYeOXOntCA&utm_source=copy-link&nd=1

Seriously Funny – Screencaptures

Sì Passione Éclat to be launched in 2022
Posted on
Jan 5, 2022

Sì Passione Éclat to be launched in 2022

Hi, everyone!

A new variant of Sì perfume — Sì Passione Éclat is planned to be released this year. Also, the screenplay for Don’t Look Up is now online.

Eau de parfum Sì Passione Éclat de Parfum by Giorgio Armani – a bright new interpretation of the legendary Sì flavor. It personifies bold and modern femininity, reminds of the power of passion that illuminates life, filling it with meaning. This luminous rose-floral composition with a sensual heart of roses inspires women to reveal their strengths, to conquer the world with confidence and grace.

Sì Passione Éclat de Parfum opens with a sparkling citrus note of bergamot and a bright accord of black currant, demonstrating the lightness and new green freshness of the fruity notes characteristic of Sì aromas. At the heart of the composition is an attractive feminine duet of roses: gentle pastel-powdery centifolia and sweet, enveloping damascene. The base is composed of white musk, which gives the fragrance a clean and soft sensuality, while vanilla extract gives it a warm, captivating sound. The sillage is light, fresh and at the same time delicate and enveloping.

The iconic Si bottle, with a luminous ruby ??lacquer finish, reflects the radiant character of the fragrance, sparkling like a jewel.

The perfume is currently showing on the Russian version of Armani Beauty website.

Don’t Look Up Updates

The screenplay for Don’t Look Up is now available online. For anyone interested, click here to download.

Check out this video interview with the cast.

Source: IFragrance

Dont’ Look Up out now on Netflix; and interviews
Posted on
Dec 26, 2021

Dont’ Look Up out now on Netflix; and interviews

Happy Holidays, everyone!

Don’t Look Up is now available to stream on Netflix (worldwide). Screencaptures from the movie are now available on our gallery, and a few interviews with Cate has been released. Enjoy!

Femme fatale of ‘Nightmare Alley’; and Nightmare Alley and 032c Magazine Photos
Posted on
Dec 21, 2021

Femme fatale of ‘Nightmare Alley’; and Nightmare Alley and 032c Magazine Photos

Hello, blanchetters!

Another photo from 032c Magazine photoshoot has been released. We have also added some HQ posters, behind the scenes, and stills from Nightmare Alley on our gallery. Associated Press published an interview with Cate and Guillermo del Toro.

032c Magazine

Riccardo Tisci himself is in charge of the creative direction of the shooting, and Mart & Marcus, a world-famous photographer, is in charge of the shooting. Cate Blanchett has an overwhelming presence in Burberry’s Spring / Summer 2022 pre-collection and iconic trench coat. This shoot was made possible by the long-standing relationship between Riccardo Tisci and Cate Blanchett, Mart & Marcus. In the paper, Riccardo Tisci talks about how he became Burberry’s chief creative officer.

Click the image for higher resolution and more photos:

Nightmare Alley posters, stills, and behind the scene photos by Kerry Hayes

Poster

Behind the scenes
Stills
POTENTIAL SPOILER in the interview below is highlighted in blue.

Blanchett, del Toro on the femme fatale of ‘Nightmare Alley’

With a touch of Barbara Stanwyck, a sumptuous Art Deco office and a deadly shade of crimson lipstick, Cate Blanchett plays a femme fatale in Guillermo del Toro’s “Nightmare Alley” with cunning embrace and subversion of the film noir archetype.

If “Nightmare Alley” is del Toro’s lushly composed love letter to noir, the movie’s pulpy heart is in Blanchett’s conniving psychiatrist Lilith Ritter. She doesn’t enter the film until halfway through, when Bradley Cooper’s carnival huckster, Stan, catches her eye in his nightclub mind-reading act, and the two begin scheming together. But when she does turn up, Blanchett shifts the film’s fable-like frequency, conjuring deeper shades of mystery from the movie’s rich tapestry of shadow and fate.

“We tailored the part for her, but she fit in those clothes on the first try,” says del Toro.

In period films like “Carol,” “The Good German” and “The Aviator,” Blanchett has often evoked a classical kind of mid-century movie stardom. But in “Nightmare Alley,” an adaptation of the ’40s novel first made into Edmund Golding’s well-regarded 1947 film (currently streaming on the Criterion Channel), Blanchett slides into one of the movies’ most iconic types by trading less on her character’s seductiveness than on her razor-sharp intellect.

“What I thought was timely and dangerous about this story was it’s an exploration of the truth,” Blanchett said in an interview from Brighton, England. “Playing such a deliberately mysterious and ambiguous character I found really challenging because you have to know there’s a lot going on, but you’re never invited into exactly what she’s thinking.”

It’s one of two roles this December for Blanchett that revolve centrally around American deception and disinformation. There’s “Nightmare Alley,” currently in theaters, and Adam McKay’s “Don’t Look Up,” which arrives Friday on Netflix. In the latter, she plays a TV morning news anchor who cheerfully steers the news away from an impending asteroid doomsday and toward lighter subjects — like the sex appeal of Leonardo DiCaprio’s scientist.

There may be something timeless about Blanchett in “Nightmare Alley,” but to her, both films are characterized by their timeliness.

“It was such a privilege to be on a film set in this particular point in human history,” Blanchett says. “One should always be alive to the time in which what you’re making is going to be viewed. I never felt that more profoundly than making these two films.”

Blanchett and del Toro had discussed various projects for years but came together for the first time on “Nightmare Alley.” (She also voices a role in the director’s upcoming stop-motion animated “Pinocchio” — another film about truth telling.)

Del Toro, who calls his kinship with author James M. Cain “profound,” had long pined to pay tribute to noir. His affection for the genre runs deep. In his previous film, the best-picture Oscar-winner “The Shape of Water,” del Toro explicitly referenced Otto Preminger’s “Fallen Angel.” An avid collector, del Toro calls the portrait that hangs in Preminger’s “Laura” “the one prop I would kill to own.”

“I read all of (Raymond) Chandler right before I married,” says del Toro. “I’m not sure why.”

Del Toro scripted “Nightmare Alley” with film critic Kim Morgan, whom he wed earlier this year. His taste in noir leans toward seedy, rather than the more elegant varieties, and films that inhabit an audacious psychology.

“I like these characters, like Bette Davis in ‘Beyond the Forest,’ who are too smart for their environment,” he says. “I root for them not because I think they do things that are good but because I agree that they are left without recourse in what seems like a rigged game. That’s the noir that I find interesting.”

One touchstone for “Nightmare Alley” was 1949’s “Too Late for Tears,” a nasty noir starring Lizabeth Scott as a housewife who finds a bag full of cash. (Del Toro and Morgan screened it recently on TCM.) Tasting a chance for freedom from her husband and more, Scott’s character clings to the money. Del Toro and Morgan envisioned Lilith similarly as operating within a male-controlled society.

“Frankly, it’s the character I was completely passionate about creating with Cate,” he says. “She’s almost like an avenger. We said: Whatever happened to her in the past, she’s sort of righting the wrongs.

To Blanchett, the term femme fatale suggests a diabolical woman — “like a siren seeking to draw the male character onto the rocks to destroy them for no reason apart from they have diabolical urges.”

Blanchett and del Toro instead played with subtle gradations in Lilith’s motives. Blanchett thought one line of dialogue was too straightforward, and del Toro agreed in cutting it. But he still quotes the speech a little ruefully: “Do you know what it is for a woman like me to grow up in a town where the smartest man is just a stupid beast?”

“Even though there’s nothing explicit that Lilith says about her background, there’s a sense that she’s damaged goods from the system, that she wants to burn down and she’s going to use Stan to do it,” says Blanchett. “Her faith in him and the men who run the system is nonexistent.”

Del Toro shot Blanchett’s scenes with Cooper, he says, like three 5-10-minute miniature plays. Inside Lilith’s ornate, wood-paneled office, the two con artists dance — a shifting drama told through blocking and camera movement. It’s a chess game that Lilith, inevitably, will win.

Source: PR Times, AP

Cate Blanchett AACTA International Nomination; 032c Magazine Photos; & New Interview and Nightmare Alley Featurette
Posted on
Dec 19, 2021

Cate Blanchett AACTA International Nomination; 032c Magazine Photos; & New Interview and Nightmare Alley Featurette

Hi, Blanchett fans!

Cate has been nominated at the AACTA International for her performance in Don’t Look Up. A new Nightmare Alley featurette has been released. Check out some of the photos from 032C photoshoot below.

AACTA International Nomination

The 2021 AACTA International Awards will be presented virtually at 7 a.m. AEDT on Thursday, Jan. 27 (12 p.m. PT on Wednesday January 26).

Nightmare Alley Featurette

Screencaptures

A double dose of the great Cate for the holidays

This morning I had the opportunity to interview Cate Blanchett, whose latest film Nightmare Alley opens today. I got to see that in a packed preview screening earlier this month at the spectacular Academy Museum theater and it looked stunning (not sure howI would have reviewed its considerable visual glories off a link). I brought up the fact that it is so great to see this Guillermo del Toro film opening exclusively in theaters, and it is great to see people going back, however cautiously.

“It is crazy times but I doubt there is going to be a non-crazy time in the near future,” she said. “I really think people, well I can speak for myself, but I think the one thing I missed, even though we are not out of the woods yet, the one thing I missed in the epicenter of the pandemic was gathering in the dark with strangers, because it does add to the experience when other people you don’t know are all joined in that experience.”

Blanchett had high praise for her director, working with del Toro for the first time, saying, “Guillermo is a singular filmmaking creature. There is no one like him making movies.” This two-time Oscar winner has obviously worked with a lot of great directors, so that is saying something.

Nightmare Alley is a delicious period film noir in which the psychiatrist she portrays goes toe to toe on the dark side with a devious Bradley Cooper in this remake of the 1947 Tyrone Power classic and reimagining of the controversial book that came out in 1946. It is a film that has strong entertainment value but also a timely message. In some ways you could say, even though this film is set in 1939 and early ’40s, it talks about things Blanchett thinks are a global problem today, including the Big Lie.

“It is a big problem today, this relationship with the truth, and something that obviously the film deals with absolutely is the most dangerous part is when the liar starts to believe the lie,” she said. “It is sort of relevant to the old Soviet era, the systems we labored under, where we know they are lying, they know that we know and don’t give a damn, and we don’t give a damn either…I think it is very nightmarish.”

Usually film noir is in black and white, but this was shot in color. However, as we were chatting this morning I told Blanchett, who was Zooming in from England, that it was just announced there will be a special black-and-white version of the movie released to select theaters in January. I for one can’t wait. “Guillermo talked about it when we were shooting saying ‘Oh maybe this should be in black and white but they’ll kill me,’ but it is so great they finally are getting to do that,” she said. “I don’t enjoy watching myself on screen, but I loved watching this movie so I will queue up and buy a ticket.”

Blanchett not only has Nightmare Alley this holiday season, but also the hilarious, timely and pertinent Don’t Look Up, the all-star Adam McKay comedy in theaters and hitting Netflix next week. The pic uses the premise of an impending comet about to destroy Earth as a wry comment on the lack of urgency by many for the distinct dangers of climate change.

I wondered if she was now picking movies like these two that not only have great entertainment value, but also have something important to say; both films were nominated this week for Best Picture by the Critics Choice Association. “It is very rare that two movies come along like this in relatively quick succession and you get to be a part of it,” she said. “Both of them have such exceptional casts, with two incredibly distinctive directorial voices, and you’ve got all of these people working at the top of their game in films that deal with very contemporary relevant issues but doing it in a way through allegory and metaphor and satire, so that there’s no agitprop preaching quality to either film at all. They are there to hold the audience’s hand and entertain them and hopefully leave them feeling more deeply, connecting maybe. It is very rare. I feel pretty blessed to have been a small part of both.”

032c Magazine

Source: Variety, Deadline

Nightmare Alley and Don’t Look Up Updates
Posted on
Dec 15, 2021

Nightmare Alley and Don’t Look Up Updates

Hi, blanchetters!

We’ve made some updates with the gallery — screencaptures, behind the scenes, stills, FYC campaigns for both Nightmare Alley and Don’t Look Up have been added to their respective folders. There’s also new featurette and clips released as we are nearing the US release (December 17th) of Nightmare Alley. Check them below.

Cate on GMA

According to ABC News Public Relations Cate is set to appear on Good Morning America on December 17th as part of the promotion for Nightmare Alley.

Friday, Dec. 17—Actress Marisa Tomei (“Spider-Man No Way Home”); actress Cate Blanchett (“Nightmare Alley”); 12 Days of Cookies with Trisha Yearwood

Nightmare Alley Updates

HBO First Look: Nightmare Alley which is a 12-minute behind the scene look on the Guillermo Del Toro’s Nightmare Alley is now available on HBO Max in the US. Here’s Cate’s commentary and Lilith behind the scenes/clips.

Screencaptures

Behind the scenes

Stills

Critics Choice and Screen Actors Guild Awards FYC Campaign

 

Cate has been nominated for Best Supporting Actress from two different critics associations for her portrayal of Dr. Lilith Ritter

Don’t Look Up News

The cast of Don’t Look Up has been nominated for Best Acting Ensemble in the 27th annual Critics Choice Awards. The ceremony will be held on Sunday, January 9, 2022 and will be broadcast live on The CW television network.

BEST ACTING ENSEMBLE

Belfast

Don’t Look Up

The Harder They Fall

Licorice Pizza

The Power of the Dog

West Side Story

Source: ABC, Critics Choice

Cate Blanchett in Porter Magazine; & New Nightmare Alley Clips, and Don’t Look Up Still
Posted on
Nov 29, 2021

Cate Blanchett in Porter Magazine; & New Nightmare Alley Clips, and Don’t Look Up Still

Hello, everyone! Feeling ecstatic with this new Cate update!

Cate covers Porter Magazine. We have updated the gallery with the editorials and the outtakes. There are new footage from Nightmare Alley clips, and Vogue published an article on the costumes in the movie. Also, new still from Don’t Look Up has been released.

Leading Light with Cate Blanchett

Few actors have the cachet of CATE BLANCHETT, but what really drives the multi-Oscar-winning star these days? She talks to AJESH PATALAY about choosing projects that provoke, overcoming parenting challenges and why she’s not interested in ‘winning’ the scene

Click image for higher resolution

When Cate Blanchett finds her groove, it’s like a wind catching in her sails – and a wonderful thing to behold. She’s currently in Berlin, where she’s shooting Tàr, a movie written and directed by Todd Field, in which she plays an eminent music conductor. Having just come off a night shoot when we speak, the actor takes a few minutes to revive. Talking about Berlin, a city she adores, instantly warms her up. “There are so many expat Australians living here,” she effuses. “I feel very at home.”

Next, Blanchett moves into enthusiastic discussion about Tàr, in which she gets to conduct (or pretend to) a full orchestra: “It’s been astonishing. Just to be vibrating in that space with that many musicians.” This leads her on to a rhapsody about a National Trust performance that was broadcast live during the first UK lockdown in 2020, for which five musicians in different locations began playing as daylight broke where they were, building from a solo to a quintet. “My husband and I lay there – we’re sort of on a hill…” Blanchett says of the manor estate in East Sussex (which includes an orchard where, naturally, she presses apples in her downtime), where she lives with her playwright/director husband Andrew Upton and their four children. “We just watched the dawn, in russet mantle clad, emerging,” she says, quoting Shakespeare, “knowing there were about 5,000 other people listening to this music. It was the most beautiful gift that came out of the pandemic.”

Five minutes later, we’re on to climate change and Blanchett is firing on all cylinders. The subject is her next release, Don’t Look Up, a boisterous satire from writer/director Adam McKay about two astronomers (played by Leonardo DiCaprio, himself a fierce advocate for climate action, and Jennifer Lawrence) who try to warn mankind about an approaching comet that will destroy Earth. Everyone, from clickbait pundits and tech billionaires to inept presidents, is subject to ridicule in a story that becomes an obvious metaphor for global warming. Blanchett plays a TV talk-show host, a model of artificiality with bleached-blonde hair, blinding white teeth and impossibly bronzed skin. “Actually, it’s a revolting moment when you wash that makeup off and see the sludge going [down the drain],” she recalls. “It’s quite confronting.”

On the environmental matters that inform the film, she doesn’t sugar any pills. “Everyone is trying to be positive, talking about 1.5 degrees of global warming,” she says. “But 1.5 would still be disastrous. We need to be fucking scared… and demand change; be collectively courageous enough to face that fear and do something about it.” The movie, for all its doomsday messaging, is actually a laugh a minute. And there’s a particular thrill in seeing so many Hollywood stars onscreen at the same time. One pivotal scene in the White House Situation Room brings together five Oscar winners and one Oscar nominee: Blanchett, DiCaprio, Lawrence, Meryl Streep (who plays a catastrophically useless president), Mark Rylance and Jonah Hill.

What was it like being in that room? “It did feel like a Last Supper,” Blanchett says, but this was less a measure of the star wattage than of the strict Covid protocols that were in place, along with the film’s apocalyptic plot. Still, she concedes, getting to high-five Streep (which is the extent of their interaction onscreen) “was great”.

At the same time, Blanchett stars opposite Bradley Cooper in Guillermo del Toro’s Nightmare Alley, a period noir set in the world of a traveling carnival that follows the “rise and fall of a liar”, according to del Toro. Many will see the film (like Don’t Look Up) as a response to the Trump era. “I definitely think this was something boiling in Guillermo,” says Blanchett. “[The film] is a real dark night of the soul. You watch a man breaking the rules, getting away with it… and refusing to show sympathy or compassion.”

McKay has said Don’t Look Up was inspired by a litany of “disastrous presidents”. And Blanchett points to other populist leaders, remarking on the common thread. “I’m hoping it’s a white-male ghost dance,” she says. “They realize they’re on the edge of extinction and they’re panicking. We’re witnessing them in their death throes, which is why it’s so aggressive and destructive.” I ask if, on the contrary, such leaders could see a resurgence. “That’s why people have to vote,” she fires back. “And exercise their power. I’m sounding like I’m on a soapbox, which I’m not interested in, but it’s important to not give in. I’m not giving up hope. As I say to my kids [on climate change], if we’re going out, how do we choose to go out? It’s a terrible conversation to have with your 13-year-old, isn’t it? But anyway. We do laugh around the dinner table. That’s what’s good about Adam’s film. You have to laugh.”

Understandably, Blanchett prefers discussions about her work and not to be caught soapboxing. “I couldn’t be less interested in agitprop [or] telling people what to think,” she says. But she is drawn to films that “ask provocative questions” and she isn’t afraid to get behind causes she believes in, such as Prince William’s Earthshot Prize, which awards contributions to environmentalism. She also recognizes how fraught being outspoken in public can be. “You have to be judicious,” she says. “I’ve been asked to do things by people and I’ve said, ‘I think I’m going to be a liability’.” Her presence can derail a debate, she acknowledges, as she draws the focus over the issues.

She also sees how polarized – and mired by point-scoring – public discourse has become. “I’m very sad about the loss of genuine debate,” she says, “where leaders, public intellectuals and everyday citizens try to find common ground, try to understand the issue, rather than try to win… Even in acting, people talk about [how] to ‘win’ the scene. No, we have to make the scene come alive. And we might have to lose a bit here, win a bit there.”

iven how social media is sharpening the debate, I wonder how much that comes up in conversations with her teenage children Dashiell, Roman and Ignatius, and her youngest, Edith. “A lot,” she says. “Because so much of our so-called information comes through social media. I’m old enough to have been taught at school what a primary, secondary and tertiary source is. I say to the children when they mention something, ‘Where did you read it? Who has [authenticated] that? You have to learn how to read an image and article. And if you’re going to share something, you’d better make sure you have checked the sources.’ Of course, they roll their eyes. But when you hear them talk to their friends, I think they’re responsible. My son is studying physics and philosophy, so he is really interesting to talk to about [technology]. I don’t want to become a separated generation, because I also feel responsible for the landscape he is about to emerge into as an adult.”

On to lighter topics and there’s still one question of vital, global importance I have yet to ask: what did Blanchett make of Adele holding her up as ‘her style icon’ in a recent interview for Vogue? The actor laughs. “I was absolutely chuffed! I think she is amazing. So down to earth. Our paths crossed when she came to Australia on tour.”

As for her own style icons, Blanchett cites Iris Apfel and Fran Lebowitz. And her regard for fashion can be traced back to her early years playing dress-up with her sister: “My sister would dress me up and I would pretend to be whatever the costume told me to be,” she recalls.

She’s clearly not lost her appetite for childish play because, when asked to name the role she’s most enjoyed playing across her illustrious career, it isn’t the historical dramas, fantasy epics or action blockbusters that first spring to mind. It’s “voicing a monkey” in Guillermo del Toro’s upcoming version of Pinocchio. “That was hilarious,” she says. “I’d listen to a lot of different chimpanzees, then try everything out. You go back to being six years old. I mean, I have a six-year-old, so [I did] a bit of work with [her] too.” That must have been fun for her daughter. “Actually, she got rapidly sick of my noises,” Blanchett smiles. “Hopefully, the audience won’t.” As if we ever could.

‘Don’t Look Up’ is in cinemas from December 10 and on Netflix from December 24. ‘Nightmare Alley’ is in cinemas from December 17 (US) and January 21 (UK)

Porter Magazine

Creating the Costumes for the Charlatans, Hustlers, and Con Artists of Guillermo del Toro’s Nightmare Alley

Nightmare Alley is Del Toro’s homage to classic film noir, where a character’s alluring façade can mask ulterior motives. Take Dr. Lilith Ritter, a glamorous psychiatrist who attempts to expose Stanton as a fraud before getting tangled in his web of deception. She’s played by Cate Blanchett in full femme fatale mode, and her collection of stylish gowns and velvet capes reveals more about the character than any verbal description.

“Luis designed a reality with his costumes that reflect personality and help tell the story,” Del Toro says. “Leather, wool, embroidery—they all define character and integrate visually to a color and texture palette, seamlessly.”

Ahead of Nightmare Alley’s December 17 premiere in theaters, Sequeira shared some of his costume sketches with Vogue and spoke about bringing Del Toro’s sinister world to life.

Dr. Ritter represents the world of distinguished old money that Stanton wishes to inhabit. Sequeira cites her as his favorite character to dress in Nightmare Alley, drawing inspiration from Paris fashion sketches from the ’40s for Blanchett’s designs. “It was all about working with Cate’s body frame and making her look as beautiful as possible, which isn’t difficult,” he says. The designer culled materials from various archives across Spain, Italy, and the U.K., pulling different types of velvet for Dr. Ritter’s collection of glamorous eveningwear. “There’s one gown that had little brass stitching throughout, so in the low lighting of the Copa, any kind of movement really made the fabric sing.”

Click image for higher resolution and more concept art photos:

Check these two new clips with some unseen clips from the movie.

 

Vogue

Don’t Look Up

Don’t Look Up offers plenty of comedic knives for Trumpism (the title is the rallying cry of science deniers), but it’s also a brutal send-up of the media. Cate Blanchett’s take on a morning show anchor for a show called The Daily Rip is as close to Mika Brzezinski as one could get without being an impersonation. Even The New York Times comes in for a spanking.

Vanity Fair

TÁR release date; & Nightmare Alley Promotions
Posted on
Nov 26, 2021

TÁR release date; & Nightmare Alley Promotions

Hi, Blanchetters!

Focus Features has released a bit more information on TÁR including it’s release date. Nightmare Alley promotion will begin with Cate as guest on The Late Night Show with Stephen Colbert on December 1st followed by Good Morning America on December 2nd. A new clip has also been released, and a new behind the scene photo shared by still photographer, Kerry Hayes. Don’t Look Up will also have a New York premiere on December 5th but it is not confirmed yet if Cate will attend. Check them below.

Todd Field’s TÁR Starring Cate Blanchett Sets Release Date

Focus Features will release Todd Field’s TÁR on Friday, October 7, 2022 domestically.

About TÁR

Focus Features and Universal Pictures International present TÁR. The new motion picture from three-time Academy Award® nominated filmmaker Todd Field, starring two-time Oscar-winner Cate Blanchett. The film, set in the international world of classical music, centers on Lydia Tár, widely considered one of the greatest living composer/conductors and first-ever female chief conductor of a major German orchestra. The supporting cast includes Nina Hoss, Noémie Merlant, Sophie Kauer, Julian Glover, Mark Strong, Allan Corduner, and Sylvia Flote.

The score for TÁR will be composed by Grammy-winning composer Hildur Guðnadóttir. The first female composer to win an Academy Award, Golden Globe, and BAFTA Award for Best Original Score.

TÁR’s website is already up. Click the photo:

Nightmare Alley Promo

Let the Nightmare Alley promo begins! Cate will on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert which airs at 11:35 p.m. ET/PT on CBS. She will also be on Good Morning America airing from 7:00-9:00AM ET on ABC.

Good Morning America: Thursday, Dec. 2—Actress Cate Blanchett (“Nightmare Alley”); Deals and Steals with ABC e-commerce editor Tory Johnson; GMA’s Rise and Shine tour of America: Nevada

Publicity in NY on MTA Shuttle

Don’t Look Up Premiere

Source: Focus Features, Late Night, GMA, Don’t Look Up

Nightmare Alley Final Trailer and Character Posters; & First Reactions on Don’t Look Up
Posted on
Nov 19, 2021

Nightmare Alley Final Trailer and Character Posters; & First Reactions on Don’t Look Up

Hi, blanchetters! Less than a month to go before the release of Don’t Look Up (December 10th) and Nightmare Alley (December 17th) in US cinemas. Searchlight Pictures released the final trailer; and posters for Nightmare Alley. First social reactions from Thursday screening of Don’t Look Up are also out. Full review of the movie will be out when the movie premiere. Check them below.

Nightmare Alley Trailer and Posters

Final Trailer Screencaptures

Click image for higher resolution:

First Reactions on Don’t Look Up

Blanchett’s Fox News/Megyn Kelly-esque figure is sensationally humorous, and I found her to be the most impressive of the supporting women. – Clayton Davis from Variety