Nightmare Alley available now to stream on HBO Max and Hulu
Posted on
Feb 5, 2022

Nightmare Alley available now to stream on HBO Max and Hulu

Great day, everyone!

Nightmare Alley is now available to stream on HBO Max and Hulu in the US. We have updated the gallery with some behind the scenes photos, FYC campaign posters, and screencaptures from the movie and behind the scene look. The black and white version of Nightmare Alley is also playing nationwide in the US and selected theatres in UK and Mexico. Check out some interviews as well.

Screencaptures

Behind the Scenes


4K Trailer Screencaptures

On the Red Carpet Presents: Nightmare Alley Behind the Scenes

FYC Campaign

Black and White version release

Interview

Star-Gazing: In Conversation With Cate Blanchett

It’s a strange feeling to stare into the void of a Zoom loading screen, waiting for a two-time Oscar winner to join the call. But that’s what I did one Sunday morning, counting the seconds until my interview with Cate Blanchett began. Her schedule was packed—plenty of news services wanted interviews regarding her recent roles in Nightmare Alley and Don’t Look Up, two movies considered likely to receive Oscars nominations—but she found the time for a half-hour audio call.

I take a deep but not quite calming breath as she joins; knowing time is limited, we briefly exchange greetings and begin. The first thing I want to know is how she was cast in Nightmare Alley, a film noir about the rise and fall of Stan Carlisle, a carnival mentalist in 1940s America. In the movie, Blanchett plays Dr. Lilith Ritter, a cunning psychologist who seems to partner with Stan, but has an agenda of her own.

She tells me that she and director Guillermo del Toro had previously spoken about working on a project together; while that original project never bore fruit, he kept her in mind when it came time to cast Nightmare Alley. “I read the script, and was blown away by it, because it felt so distinct and obviously was drawing from deep recesses of not only the novel,” she says (referring to the 1946 novel by William Lindsay Gresham which the movie adapts), “but things that Guillermo and [co-writer] Kim Morgan had been thinking about for a long time.” I agree with her, saying that the movie’s clearly inspired by del Toro’s personal interests, such as his fondness for filming weird things in jars.

Laughing, she tells me that she and del Toro have a shared love of the horror genre—“I was gripped by that all through my adolescence…I now can’t watch a horror movie without peeing my pants”. But Nightmare Alley doesn’t just rely on the sinister visuals that del Toro is often associated with; rather, halfway through the film the setting shifts from a seedy, exploitative carnival to the elegant ballrooms and offices of New York. While beautiful, it’s ultimately an equally dark and destructive realm—“there’s blood in the panels of those walls,” Blanchett says of that setting.

So what makes film noir relevant as a genre these days? There are so many archetypes of the genre that can be used in a sloppy way, Blanchett notes, and a mere replica of its conventions can just end up being a “cinematic history lesson”. But what del Toro has done is to harness the tropes of the genre—characters haunted by a dark past, spaces that are claustrophobic and confining—and show how they remain pertinent to the psychology of the modern world.

Gresham’s novel was previously adapted as a black-and-white film in 1947 by director Edmund Goulding, and while Blanchett likes the film and had seen it prior to signing on to this project, she does point out a limitation in its storytelling. For her, the 1947 adaptation’s characterization of Dr. Ritter felt “hazy”, less memorable than some of its other components—but this, in a way, was useful.

Without the fear of being held back by Dr. Ritter’s portrayal in the previous version, she could put her own spin on the character. “She had to be a little Sphinx-like, in the sense that she’s asking the question, but you sense that there’s a power and weight of experience behind those questions,” she says. Del Toro prepared a detailed biography for the character, which Blanchett tells me was headed by a quote from Hamlet: “I am very proud, revengeful, ambitious, with more offences at my beck than I have thoughts to put them in, imagination to give them shape, or time to act them in”.

However, because she knew that to explicitly show her character’s past would be saying too much, the movie only hints at her true self and history. Blanchett especially praises the film’s production design, by Tamara Deverell, as a means of implying Dr. Ritter’s true nature—“I’ve never walked onto a set that so absolutely represented the character I was playing”. Ultimately, she didn’t want the character to be a stereotypical femme fatale, who sought to destroy men “simply because”; rather, Dr. Ritter had been physically and mentally scarred by a cruel world, and was trying to bring about a twisted form of justice.

But that goal wouldn’t be achieved without Stan Carlisle, played by Bradley Cooper, who her character simultaneously works with and undermines. “I adore Bradley”, she says, as an actor as well as a producer and director. They found that they had similar rhythms as actors, so that performing alongside him was enjoyable even in the darkest and most complex scenes—“it’s a dance of death…it’s a matador and a bull,” she says of their characters’ dynamics.

On the topic of the actor’s craft, does she see acting more as telling the truth or telling lies? She reflects on the question, telling me that for her, ultimately, “acting is revealing”. The things revealed can range from being pleasant to repulsive—“but it’s never, ever telling an audience what to think…I suppose that’s what art is, isn’t it? It does more and resonates more than what it seems to do on the surface.” Maybe that’s why some people think that art and acting is deception, she says.

With this film and Don’t Look Up (a disaster movie by Adam McKay that satirizes the inaction and misinformation surrounding the climate crisis) speaking to the uncertainty of the modern world, I ask her what it’s like to try and make sense of truth in a time where nothing seems to be known. She agrees that it’s become difficult to hunt the truth out, to get at the things that are foundational to a democracy. “I feel for students at the moment,” she says, wondering when it was that truth became degraded into nothing more than competing information sources—in the last six years? since the Cold War? “Certainly in the last four years, that word itself has been so destroyed”.

As for the function of art in general, she says, “I don’t think art is political; it’s wilfully not”. Whereas politics focuses on the here and now, artists have the freedom to look backwards or forwards in time, such as how del Toro’s film uses the 1940s to reflect modern cultural questions back at us. For her, art is a provocation, a space for dangerous ideas: “art is a much more irresponsible medium—it has to be”.

This leads the conversation to current affairs, specifically the experience of making movies during COVID–apart from her two aforementioned projects, last year she finished filming TÁR, a drama film by Todd Field, and is about to begin filming Disclaimer, a seven-part series by Alfonso Cuaron, as well as an adaptation of Lucia Berlin’s short stories, directed by Pedro Almodóvar, next year. Noting the importance of how stories and films provided escapism amidst the pandemic’s stresses, Blanchett tells me that she felt privileged to be part of the film industry. However, she also notes that “there are millions of out-of-work performers, particularly in the live performing arts” who’ve not been as lucky as her and have struggled because of the pandemic.

Blanchett also stresses that the film industry also hasn’t fully processed other key cultural moments such as Black Lives Matter or MeToo, and the need to address these systemic issues in an uncompromising way. “The pandemic revealed just how broken everything was,” she concludes this train of thought by saying, “as you put the pieces back together, the upside is that there’s an understood necessity in our industry to fix it.”

My final question for her is to ask, on behalf of our readers (and myself), for any film recommendations she might have. She replies that while she hasn’t been able to see anything in a cinema yet, she rewatched the 1981 TV miniseries adapting the novel Brideshead Revisited, singling out Jeremy Irons’ performance for particular praise. More recent works she singles out for praise include Long Day’s Journey Into Night, by Bi Gan—recommended to her by her son—the movies of Josephine Decker and Lucrecia Martel, and Pedro Almodóvar’s Parallel Mothers. It’s clear from how she speaks that these are movies she genuinely feels passionate about.

With that, she answers my final question—or so I assume. Because, later that day, she messages me with one final recommendation: “The other film to see is RED ROCKET. Unforgettable”.

Note: We have added the countries where the black and white version of Nightmare Alley is released.

Source: Nightmare Alley, Cherwell

 

Nightmare Alley Streaming Release Date; Behind the scenes and featurette
Posted on
Jan 22, 2022

Nightmare Alley Streaming Release Date; Behind the scenes and featurette

Hello!

Nightmare Alley will soon be released on streaming services in the US. A special behind the scenes look on the movie which is almost 23 minutes long and the featurette on the movie’s cinematography were released. Martin Scorsese also wrote on an op-ed on LA Times on why you should give Nightmare Alley a watch. Like we always remind, beware of spoilers if you have not seen the movie. Enjoy!

Nightmare Alley Will Be Streaming on Hulu and HBO Max in February

Guillermo del Toro’s R-rated thriller “Nightmare Alley” is heading to streaming sooner than many expected. The film, which stars Bradley Cooper and Cate Blanchett, will be available to stream on both Hulu and HBO Max starting February 1, 2022.

The streaming release comes less than two months after the Searchlight Pictures film was released exclusively in theaters, on Dec. 17.

Nightmare Alley Cinematography FYC

In the video, del Toro even offers a clue to his motivation for releasing the whole film, which also stars Cate Blanchett, Rooney Mara, and Richard Jenkins, in a black-and-white version, which opened in select Los Angeles theaters last week. Del Toro and Laustsen shared their thoughts on this version with TheWrap: “I kept saying, ‘Oh, my God, I wish I could do both releases,’” the director raved.

Cinematography FYC Featurettes Screencaptures

Behind the Scenes

Martin Scorsese wants you to watch ‘Nightmare Alley.’ Let him tell you why

A few weeks ago, I caught up with Guillermo del Toro’s “Nightmare Alley.” I was impressed and moved. I look forward to watching anything that Guillermo does, but this particular picture had a special power and resonance for me.

Then I came to realize that people just weren’t coming out for it, which was distressing. Obviously, this past holiday season was a tricky moment to release any movie. But I also wonder if there has been a real appreciation of Guillermo’s accomplishment.

I would bet that the term “noir” has appeared in most of the reviews and comments about “Nightmare Alley,” and with good reason. The characters are all haunted, many are doomed, and the film is based on a novel with the kind of wild labyrinthine plot that is a hallmark of film noir. On top of that, the novel was filmed once before, right after its publication in 1946, and the earlier version directed by Edmund Goulding has long been considered a classic of the genre.

But the term “noir” has been used so often and in such a cheeky way that it seems more like a flavor than anything else, and it might just lead someone seeking information about the picture in the wrong direction. They might be expecting a noir “pastiche,” of which there have been many. That doesn’t even begin to do justice to Guillermo and Kim Morgan’s adaptation.

The majority of the picture takes place in the ‘30s, and it seems to grow out of the bitterness and despair of the depression: You can feel it in the images and in the body language of the actors. All the characters in this film are feeling real pain, a sense of spiritual desolation rooted in everyday life. This isn’t just a matter of “style” or “visuals,” exquisite as the film is. It’s a matter of Guillermo’s complete commitment to the material, to bringing his vision to life with his production designer, his costume designer, his DP and his amazing cast, led by Bradley Cooper and Cate Blanchett. They work together to create a dead-end universe from out of the American past, and they do it inside and out, through and through.

In that sense, the film is truer to the animating spirit of film noir than the many “homages” that have been made over the years and are still being made now. Guillermo is certainly speaking from and to his own time, but he’s doing so in the idiom of a time gone by, and the urgency and despair of then overlaps with the urgency and despair of now in a way that’s quite disturbing. It’s like a warning bell.

Disturbing, but exhilarating at the same time. That’s what art can do.

COVID-19 has also been extremely tough on the cinema in general. It’s added time-consuming protocols and extremely expensive insurance packages to the budgets of all films, big and small. It’s resulted in the closure of many theaters and a resistance to going back to the ones that are still open. And on top of everything else … Omicron.

If you decided to just file “Nightmare Alley” away under “noir” or some other category, I would urge you to take a second closer look. And if you decided to skip it altogether, for whatever reason, please reconsider. In essence, what I’m trying to say is that a filmmaker like Guillermo, who gives us pictures this lovingly and passionately crafted, doesn’t just need our support: he deserves it.

Source: The Wrap, The Wrap FYC, ABC7, LA Times

Conversation with the Cast of Nightmare Alley
Posted on
Dec 27, 2021

Conversation with the Cast of Nightmare Alley

Good day, Blanchetters!

An hour conversation with the cast of Nightmare Alley moderated by Laura Dern has been released. Watch below.

Warning: There are spoilers in the conversation

To follow up his Best Picture-winning “The Shape of Water,” Guillermo Del Toro pulled together an enviable ensemble of accomplished A-list actors for the noirish 1930s drama, “Nightmare Alley.” Adapted from the 1946 novel, the film tracks the hubristic rise of drifting con artist Stanton Carlisle (Bradley Cooper, also a producer on the project). Carlisle parlays a show-stopping mentalist act to ascend from itinerant carnival sideshows to Chicago high society. From carnies to the upper-crust, the vibrant characters that move throughout Carlisle’s orbit will test his mettle and his moral compass.

Cooper, in particular, delves into the personal and creative kinship developed with Del Toro, as COVID delays allowed for extended prep work. The movie provided numerous firsts for the actor-producer, including the vulnerability of filming an intimate scene with Toni Collette’s veteran seer character, Zeena. Cate Blanchett, who portrays a frosty psychoanalyst keen to Carlisle’s deceptions, details how she situated a ‘laser-focused’ part within Del Toro’s collective vision. She recalls a crucial one-on-one scene with Carlisle: “You were amazing, Bradley. It was like suddenly the temperature dropped. All I had to do was let it come out of you; I didn’t have to do anything!” The candid chat among peers offers a fascinating glimpse into masterful creative processes—resulting in a film that exceeds the sum of its considerable parts.

In this mega-starry group chat organized by Searchlight, Laura Dern moderates a sprawling discussion with the bulk of the principal cast, including Cooper, Blanchett, Rooney Mara, Toni Collette, Willem Dafoe, Richard Jenkins, David Strathairn, Mary Steenburgen, and Ron Perlman. With evident warmth and mutual respect, each actor shares their experiences collaborating with Del Toro to nail their role in his meticulously realized world

Source: Backstage