A Tribute to Cate Blanchett and TÁR’s North American Premiere at 49th Telluride Film Festival
Posted on
Sep 2, 2022

A Tribute to Cate Blanchett and TÁR’s North American Premiere at 49th Telluride Film Festival

Hi, everyone!

After the world premiere of TÁR in Venice, Cate Blanchett is Telluride-bound this time as Telluride Film Festival will be paying tribute to her — she will be presented with the Silver Medallion right after the North American premiere of TÁR. The tribute will be held tomorrow, September 3rd (6:30pm MT). The following day, September 4th, there will be Q&A with Cate, Nina Hoss, and Todd Field after the 3:30pm MT screening.

It’s not easy (or always advisable) to try to explain the difference between a movie star and an actor. But as we gather to consider and celebrate Cate Blanchett’s singular achievements, what follows might help.

Movie stars tend to play iterations of themselves with slightly different wardrobe. Their bold-faced names can be as marketable as the films in which they appear. Movie stars are brands, and rarely stray from the familiar. Audiences are likely to remember their action stunts as much as their performances.

Actors, as Blanchett’s body of work attests, abhor repetition. They’d rather disappear into a part than appear on a billboard. Actors are thrilled by risk and embrace, rather than avoid, difficult and problematic characters.

Blanchett played the self-absorbed role of morning TV host Brie Evantee in DON’T LOOK UP (2021) and as Phyllis Schlaflyin the miniseries MRS. AMERICA (2021); she also played a version of herself and her cousin in COFFEE AND CIGARETTES (2003). Actors deliberately partner with distinctive storytellers, not franchise custodians. And when it comes to stunts, their cinematic feats involve leaping into a role, not out of an airplane.

Blanchett now might be as recognizable as most movie stars, but she’s always been—and continues to be—an actor first (she prefers it over actress). As befitting her talent, she has worked with some of the most celebrated directors: Martin Scorsese, Steven Spielberg, PeterJackson, Ridley Scott and David Fincher among them. She has won two Oscars, for THE AVIATOR (2004) and BLUE JASMINE (2013).

Yet Blanchett’s career and her artistic inclinations are perhaps better defined by the lesser-known yet nonetheless distinctive filmmakers with whom she has collaborated, often more than once: Terrence Malick (KNIGHT OF CUPS, 2015; VOYAGE OF TIME: LIFE’S JOURNEY, 2016; SONG TO SONG, 2017), Todd Haynes (I’M NOT THERE, 2002; CAROL, 2015) and Gillian Armstrong (OSCAR AND LUCINDA, 1997; CHARLOTTE GRAY, 2001).

Now, in what seems like a match made in cinematic heaven, Blanchett stars in TÁR, the first movie in 16 years from writer-director-actor Todd Field (LITTLE CHILDREN, 2006). In the film, Blanchett plays Lydia Tár, a world-renowned conductor and composer whose rise to the top was due to her fierce, uncompromising drive. Blanchett’s fearlessness is hardly limited to her acting choices. When Blanchett headed the Cannes Film Festival jury four years ago, she led a protest targeting Cannes’ constant dearth of female filmmakers. “The stairs of our industry must be accessible to all,” Blanchett said at the time. “Let’s climb.” We are right behind you.

–John Horn

Source: Telluride Film Festival

Cate Blanchett on Vanity Fair European Edition
Posted on
Aug 31, 2022

Cate Blanchett on Vanity Fair European Edition

Hi, Cate Blanchett fans!

TÁR’s premiere is upon us but before that Cate Blanchett has appeared on three different covers for Vanity Fair, while this is not the first time she has appeared on multiple covers for the same issue, this is the first time where it is multiple covers for three different countries (France, Italy, and Spain) released at the same time. Vanity Fair France, Italy, and Spain September 2022 issue go on sale today, August 31st. Check out the interview and photos below.

Vanity Fair France — We made this singular choice for the cover of this September Issue, with this portrait of Cate Blanchett photographed by the duo Luigi and Iango. The session took place in London at the beginning of the summer and each edition of Vanity Fair in Europe could choose its image of the Australian star for the front page. We let you imagine the debates within our editorial staff, on the framing, the intensity of the gaze and the chroma. Is black and white the subtraction of life and color? Or the multiplication of contrasts and emotion? We leave you to judge.

Vanity Fair Italy — Three different covers, an international diva and a couple of the most important photographers in the world. To celebrate the Venice Film Festival, Vanity Fair arrives on newsstands with a triple European special edition dedicated to Cate Blanchett, the artist who presents the film Tár in competition at the Venetian festival.

The actress was photographed exclusively by Luigi & Iango, a duo of star photographers with whom the magazine has started a collaboration that will see new and surprising chapters over the next year.

Vanity Fair Spain — The Australian actress returns to the big screen as the protagonist of Tár, the new film by Todd Field. Regarding her presentation at the Venice Film Festival, Antonella Bussi talks via video call with Cate Blanchett about this film in which she gives life to an orchestra conductor and where, among others, topics such as the culture of cancellation and the use of power.

VANITY FAIR European Edition – September 2022
This is a google translated interview from Spanish to English. You can find the link to the original text in Spanish, Italian and French below.

In Tár, Todd Field’s latest film, actress Cate Blanchett plays an orchestra conductor, a role for which she had to become familiar with a job traditionally attributed to men. It is one of the most anticipated projects among those that will be presented these days at the Venice Film Festival, and it deals with issues such as the fear of the passage of time, the abuse of power or the cancellation policy. Many times we have needed female examples that make us believe that evolution is possible, that male hegemony is a questionable totem. “In principle, the conductor should have been a man, in which case perhaps we would talk about it in another way. But the fact that she is a woman takes us into a space from which we can look at the issue more impartially,” the Australian tells us in our cover interview. Art has to be years ahead of society for us to visualize goals and imagine other possible futures. And for that we need the cinema, we need the stars that inspire us, we need Blanchett, sure of herself and sure of working with Field. There is always something exciting about mythical and unprolific authors. Every time they open their mouths we are sure that they will say important things.

If in September 2020, the first year of the pandemic, Cate Blanchett (Ivanhoe, Australia, 1969) presided over the Venice Film Festival jury with her resilient spirit, now, two years later, the actress returns to the Lido to compete in an edition that promises to be full of great stories and illustrious names. In the long afternoon video call that we share, Blanchett tells us about the topics that Tár addresses, the film in which she is the absolute protagonist. I log in ahead of time and am surprised to see that she’s already there. The black screen is named after Cate Upton. It is the surname of her husband, Andrew, the Australian playwright and filmmaker with whom she has been married for 25 years. She wears her hair up, glasses, a beige linen suit, and no makeup. Her voice sounds powerful: “I was looking at email,” she clarifies with her kitchen as a backdrop.

Tár is the long-awaited film by Todd Field, who returns to directing 15 years after his success with Little Children. Lydia Tár, the character played by Blanchett, is a conductor in full professional swing, but also a woman whose shadows are accentuated by the world in which she moves.

— Tár is a brave film. What was it that convinced you to play the lead?

— Look, first of all, it’s already rare for Todd to make a movie. So I wasted no time when he called me on the phone to tell me “I have a script”. And in general, I tend to be slow. I have a thousand things to think about and it takes me two weeks to read a script, but I devoured this one in 24 hours. It was very visceral. I felt that it was about something that affected my body and my spirit. That, coupled with the desire to work with Todd, was decisive in convincing me.

—How does one prepare to play a conductor?

— I asked a friend who is and I realized that it is a bit like being the center of the stage: if you do not have the perception of space, if you do not occupy it, the public does not follow you, does not know where to look or takes you seriously.

I have to be honest: on the one hand I was terrified like never before in my life. There was the pandemic, I had also lived through it, so the musicians had not played important works for a long time and, as if that were not enough, when I raised my arm to mark the rhythm I did it a little out of time. But then I realized that they needed me and I desperately needed them, and somehow the music would flow. I learned the gestures and I am unable to express how wonderful it is to feel how the music flows. It is an engaging experience!

—Indeed, it must be incredible that so many people depend on your gestures.

— All the conductors I have consulted have told me that you have to dominate the podium, you cannot show weakness. It’s a trick, like those of theater actors. You have to pretend that you know what you’re doing even if that’s not the case, it’s a question of leadership. In Australia, I participated in a leadership program and we wonder what it will be like to lead in 20, 30, 50 years. My suspicion is that being a leader will have to include the ability to say “I don’t know” or “I don’t know yet.” Have doubts and admit them. But nowadays the model is different: if you are a leader you have to say “I know, so follow me”. It’s a problem, but that’s the way things are today.

—Lydia, the protagonist, seems to experience in first person all those great issues that today divide public opinion. The first of them, that of age and the passage of time…

— Lydia is turning 50, a special moment in anyone’s life. At that point, you are aware of everything you have already done and wonder how much time you have left and what to do with it. You are at the peak of your life and your career. But what happens when you start to descend from the mountain? We always talk about success, but the path to get there is, without a doubt, much easier than that of relegation, that of failure. That is the theme of the film.

— Another issue raised by the film is the use of power by those who occupy a dominant position. Lydia, for example, uses her charisma to obtain sexual favors, to not always be correct or honest…

— Certainly. And clearly that is unacceptable. The power system can lead anyone to separate from herself. In principle, the conductor should have been a man, in which case we might talk about the subject in another way. But the fact that she is a woman brings us to a space from which we can analyze the matter more impartially. The world of classical music is one of masters, comparisons to composers of the past, and greatness that raises the question of what is allowed in the pursuit of excellence. The question is simple: “What are we allowed once we occupy a position of power? To what extent might the prodigies you meet have been corrupted by it? The film deliberately avoids giving an answer and perhaps doesn’t want to give one either, because questions are always more powerful than any answer. At this historical moment it is interesting to first understand what is happening, without judging. The power of art lies precisely in that: in helping us understand what is in front of us and only then allowing us to judge it.

—Lydia has a partner and an adopted daughter whom she loves and professes great tenderness. In it there is family intimacy but also an opposite desire, that of escaping.

— She is restless because sometimes, when things are going well for you, you feel the need to break them. For artists, creating something often means making something else die. Of course, that’s not what I do, but I get it.

—The film also addresses the issue of cancel culture, of suppression in the name of political correctness. What do you think about that?

— Making movies, music, theater or art is not a political act. What can become so is the way it is spread, digested and processed, but its production itself is not. In my opinion, the reflection that must be done is another: what do we study? I am in favor of studying how things happen in a historical context and asking questions. For example: how did women think at a certain time? Certain ideas today may seem dangerous, but erasing them and not talking about them can exacerbate the danger, because then we would be condemned to repeat the same mistakes. There must be confrontation and at the same time we must confront the systems that perpetuate abuse and prejudice. Only through these actions can progress be built.

—How much of Cate is there in the character of Lydia?

— Lydia’s character made me think a lot about what is allowed and considered acceptable in the pursuit of excellence. I recently spoke with an actress friend about how important Stella Adler, a great acting teacher, was for her career. However, today Stella would be “cancelled” and her methods would be considered excessively brutal. I think that in art a certain brutality is necessary, because if you want to stand out you must have a judge within you, be hard on yourself, have a strong critical sense of what you do. Who cares what others think, it is to their interior that any writer, actor, musician or painter must be accountable, to the point of always demanding more. But this way of generating excellence that we have used for decades no longer works because kindness is now required.

But then what is the price of excellence?

— I do not know. And I don’t think I’m great. Excellence is my mistress, I court her every day, but she is very elusive!

More than a lover, perhaps a companion.

— I hope so. However, excellence is different from success. I know many artists who have not received the recognition they deserve. That is the cruelty and riskiness of my profession. And then the obsession with legacy comes into play, as it does with my character. We see this in the Elon Musks of the world, capable of doing anything in order to leave a mark. There is a great human cost, as well as personal and artistic, in that. But what we leave to those who come after is totally out of our control and it is arrogant to think otherwise. You can only decide what you will leave to your children.

—Is it so difficult to know how to manage success?

—Someone told me at the beginning of my career that success reveals who you are, and I think it’s true because it exposes you a lot. But failure is an exceptional teacher.

— How do you survive failure?

— You can always be reborn, right? As long as you’re strong enough. T.S. Eliot said: “In my end is my beginning.” And there is always a new chapter, which sometimes requires a fall to exist. But humility is needed, another undervalued virtue. That’s why for me the film has an optimistic ending, despite everything. 

— You’re going to Venice to attend the Venice Film Festival, a big event that we hope will encourage people to return to the cinemas.

— It will be great to go to Venice and, of course, I hope that the festival will help to fill the cinemas. It has been and continues to be a difficult time for everyone. One of little leadership and great economic instability. Women are always the first affected, they lose their rights and control over their bodies. This instability amplifies our desire to get together, listen to music, go out. And to go to the movies, where you find stories that also help to delve into yourself, into the person you are. With the pandemic we have had a great collective experience and we must realize that we are all in this together and we have to be humble.

—You speak of humility, but yours is a truly extraordinary life…

— I’ll tell you one thing: this summer there has been an incredible heat wave in Europe and we Australians are obsessed with water and how to conserve it. Five years ago we wanted to buy several large warehouses for our house in England and people thought we were crazy because it always rains here. But there had already been a drought in Sussex and now we are in this heat. Today I have been watering my raspberries at five in the morning using the water from the tank so as not to waste the main one. If we run out of water, no matter who you are or where you are, we are out of it. We are all connected and we have to be humble.

Sources: VF France, VF Italy, VF Spain, French Interview, Italian Interview, Spanish Interview

Cate Blanchett in the new teaser for TÁR; poster and still released ahead of world premiere in Venice
Posted on
Aug 26, 2022

Cate Blanchett in the new teaser for TÁR; poster and still released ahead of world premiere in Venice

Hi, everyone!

— From producer-writer-director Todd Field comes TÁR, starring Cate Blanchett as the iconic musician Lydia Tár. TÁR examines the changing nature of power, its impact and durability in our modern world.

Focus Features has released a new teaser trailer for TÁR, it just looks as enigmatic as the first one that was released a month ago. A poster and a new still were also released. The official website of the movie has already been updated today. You can follow TÁR’s social media accounts for updates which we will be linking below. Some countries already have release dates, it will be distributed by Focus Features in the US, then Universal Pictures for global distribution.

TÁR Facebook | TÁR Instagram | TÁR Twitter

Click image to go to the site

TÁR Teaser

Click image for higher resolution

Release dates

October 7, 2022
USA, Canada

November 3, 2022
Italy

January 4, 2023
France

January 19, 2023
Netherlands

January 20, 2023
UK, Ireland, Spain, Lithuania

February 9, 2023
Singapore

February 23, 2023
Germany, Switzerland, Austria

March 10, 2023
Turkey

Source: IMDb

Documentary Now! and TÁR updates
Posted on
Aug 24, 2022

Documentary Now! and TÁR updates

Hi, Blanchett fans!

Here’s a few updates on Documentary Now! and TÁR.

Documentary Now

TIFF (Toronto International Film Festival) has released their schedule. Documentary Now! premieres on September 10th at 9:15pm. Watch the trailer below.

Three new episodes from season four of the mockumentary series Documentary Now! — created by SNL alumni Bill Hader, Seth Meyers, Fred Armisen, and Rhys Thomas — receive their World Premiere.

In this world premiere, TIFF audiences will be the first to see three episodes from the upcoming season of Documentary Now! First up is a take on My Octopus Teacher, only this version stars English comedian Jamie Demetriou (Fleabag) as an animal-obsessed filmmaker in the episode titled “My Monkey Grifter.” Second is a warm-hearted homage to Agnès Varda, starring French actor Liliane Rovère (Call My Agent) portraying an aging director trying to recapture the thrills of her youth in “Trouver Frisson.” Third is a pet project of Cate Blanchett, who fell in love with the 1990s BBC documentary Three Salons at the Seaside, which she and co-star Harriet Walter fondly lampoon in “Two Hairdressers at Bagglyport,” about a beauty parlour full of secrets (that simultaneously evokes the Anna Wintour/Vogue doc The September Issue).

— Thom Powers, TIFF Docs Programmer

Documentary Now! TIFF Schedule. Click image to book tickets. Tickets go on sale for public on September 5th

TIFF Trailer

TÁR

According to La Biennale, press conference begins approximately at 11AM CEST. There will be two films in competition on September 1st, TÁR being the first to premiere. Todd Field has also released a director’s statement on La Biennale’s website about TÁR.

This script was written for one artist, Cate Blanchett. Had she said no, the film would have never seen the light of day. Filmgoers, amateur and otherwise, will not be surprised by this. After all, she is a master supreme.

Even so, while we were making the picture, the superhuman-skill and verisimilitude of Cate was something truly astounding to behold. She raised all boats. The privilege of collaborating with an artist of this caliber is something impossible to adequately describe.
In every possible way this is Cate’s film.

Source: TIFF, La Biennale

Lip Maestro Shade 214 & Oggi Magazine Scans
Posted on
Aug 21, 2022

Lip Maestro Shade 214 & Oggi Magazine Scans

Hi, Blanchetters!

Another video from Armani Beauty for their LIP MAESTRO Campaign has been released, this time Cate Blanchett wears shade 214 of the lipstick. We also have magazine scans from Oggi No. 34 issue.

A full length trailer for TÁR was recently rated and the length of the trailer is 2 minutes and 25 seconds. It will likely be released this week or the week after which coincides with the world premiere of the movie at Venice Film Festival.

Lip Maestro

LIP MAESTRO Shade 214

Magazine Scans

Below is a part of the magazine article that is a google translated version from Italian to English. Original text can be found on the scans.

CATE THE WOMAN WHO LOVES WOMEN

At the Venice Film Festival, Blanchett will play Lydia Tár, a conductor who falls in love with two musicians. For other performances as a lesbian she has become a gay icon. But she says: “I also played an elf, yet I’m not immortal”.

Ferragamo shoes, tailor-made suits, scarf, Van Cleef & Arpels jewels, vintage handbag on the arm, chic, unresolved and courageous, yet also revolutionary: Cate Blanchett in Carol is a bourgeois close to divorce who falls in love with a saleslady, aspiring photographer, Therese, in the 50s. No wonder that they are waiting for her at the Venice Film Festival (31 August – 10 September): critics and cinephiles and the LGBTQ + community – all of them curious and anxious for her new film Tár, in competition at #Venezia79. Blanchett is Lydia Tár, one of the greatest conductors in the world and certainly the greatest in Germany. The environment is competitive and male chauvinistic. She must always prove that she is good, that she is up to the role, that she really knows the music. Plus she falls in love with two musicians. The trailer, recently posted on the web, does not speak of all this. On the contrary, it speaks of a pandemic, of bees, of the challenges that await us. There is no life of Lydia Tár who in the trailer dresses simple, in light green and appears unadorned, the opposite of Carol, with her wavy hairstyle. Biennale Cinema keep their mouths sewn together, but there is certainly this – that Blanchett will be very good in this new role of hers with (also) a homosexual theme.

Blanchett has been a gay icon since Carol’s day, very proud of it. When she posed with Nicole Kidman in a jacket and boyish pants in 2019, the web appreciated it a lot, they had butterflies in their stomachs, loving what is called her “lesbian aesthetics”. In a video from 2020, Blanchett jokingly said aloud: “I’m a lesbian.”. It happened during Instagram live with Sarah Paulson, a pansexual, star of American Horror Story, and co-star in Mrs America. Moreover, speaking of Mrs America (which tells the story of the US feminist movement), Blanchett has remained a gay icon, although in the series she plays the ultraconservative, Phyllis Schlafly, married for 44 years to the same man and mother of six children. Practically it is the only point of contact between the two. Blanchett has been married since 1997 (25 years of marriage) to playwright Andrew Upton, a bearded gentleman who looks like everyone’s neighbor, they have four children and live at Highwell House. They also have a wing dedicated to their art collection. One of the many times she was asked about her marriage, she replied: “With my husband I won the lottery and consequently with my family.”

Oggi No. 34 – August 25th 2022
Source: Alberta Film Ratings

TÁR Premiere on September 1st #Venezia79
Posted on
Aug 16, 2022

TÁR Premiere on September 1st #Venezia79

Ciao!

Biennale Cinema has released the full schedule for this year’s film festival. TÁR will have two public screenings on September 1st — at 17:15 (Sala Grande), which marks its world premiere, and 19:00 (Palabiennale). Earliest screening is on August 31st for press and industry members only. The ticket will go on sale at 15:00 (Venice time), August 17th. You can go here to book tickets and you can check the screening schedule below.

The movie is also competing for Queer Lion’s 16th Edition. The Queer Lion Award was created as a collateral prize for the “Best Film with Homosexual & Queer Culture Contents”. Here’s an updated synopsis of the movie:

Lydia Tár is an acclaimed composer who rose to become the first female chief conductor of a German orchestra. We follow Tár during her daily life living in Berlin, leading up to the recording of her latest symphony, while her sentimental life (including a complicated tormented affair with a female cellist) clashes with and threatens her burning ambitions. Tár’s adopted daughter, the exeptionally brilliant six-year-old Petra, will turn out to be the rock Lydia needs, when everything in her life seems to start going wrong.

Screening Schedule

Public Screening

 

Press-Industry Screening

UK/Australia Season

Cate has sent another short message as ambassador of UK/AU Season.

 

Source: Biennale Cinema, Queer Lion

 

TÁR at 60th New York Film Festival
Posted on
Aug 9, 2022

TÁR at 60th New York Film Festival

Hello, everyone!

TÁR has been selected as part of the main slate lineup of the 60th New York Film Festival. The festival which is presented by Film at Lincoln Center runs from September 30th through October 16th 2022. It will take place at Lincoln Center and other venues across New York City.

The charisma and emotional precision of Cate Blanchett are put to astounding use in this deft showcase for the actor’s nearly musical artistry, a stinging portrait of a world-famous orchestra conductor’s gradual unraveling that is the first film in sixteen years from director Todd Field (In the Bedroom, Little Children).

Click image for higher resolution

It was previously announced that the movie is also part of the main competition lineup at 79th Venice Film Festival. And while there is no official announcement yet from Telluride Film Festival, Alberto Barbera, who is the artistic director at Venice Film Festival, has mentioned on an interview that TÁR is also going to that festival.

Source: NYFF

TÁR Teaser
Posted on
Jul 26, 2022

TÁR Teaser

Ciao!

We finally have a teaser for TÁR which is set to premiere at the 79th Venice Film Festival (running from August 31st-September 10th) and will be released in the US on October 7th 2022 and in the UK on January 20th 2023. The film has been selected as part of the main competition category of the festival. The other cast in the film are Noémie Merlant, Nina Hoss, Sophie Kauer, Julian Glover, Allan Corduner, and Mark Strong. The films has a running time of 158 minutes. You can watch the enigmatic teaser below.

TÁR to go to Venice & The School for Good and Evil Release Date
Posted on
Jul 22, 2022

TÁR to go to Venice & The School for Good and Evil Release Date

Happy Friday!

Some great news today, our most anticipated Cate movie this year – TÁR, will have it’s world premiere at the 79th Venice Film Festival. You can also follow the movie’s official social media accounts below. The School for Good and Evil where Cate is the narrator will drop on Netflix on October 21st 2022.

Cate Blanchett Set to Bring New Movies to Venice

Focus Features will be on the Lido with Todd Field’s “Tár,” which teams the “In the Bedroom” director with Cate Blanchett as the fictional Lydia Tár, one of the world’s greatest conductors and the first female conductor of a major German orchestra. Blanchett is a Venice regular who presided over the festival’s main jury in 2020.

Full line up of movies premiering at this year’s festival will be unveiled on July 26th with screening schedule to be released at the middle of August. The festival will run from August 31st to September 10th 2022.

You can followmovie for updates on both instagram and twitter.

Click image to follow

The School for Good and Evil

 

First look at TÁR and Borderlands shown at CinemaCon
Posted on
Apr 29, 2022

First look at TÁR and Borderlands shown at CinemaCon

Happy Friday, everyone!

Attendees of CinemaCon 2022 in Las Vegas were treated to a first look at TÁR and Borderlands which will be both released this year. There is also an additional article with interview with Cate from The Hollywood Reporter for Chaplin  Awards.

TÁR Reaction

First footage of TÁR was specifically created to be shown at the event on Wednesday (April 27th). The movie is on the upcoming slate of Focus Features and is schedule to be released on October 7th 2022.

Cate Blanchett Smokes The Competition As A World-Famous Conductor

According to Deadline, the film will follow Blanchett’s Lydia Tár, a (fictional) renowned and groundbreaking conductor who becomes the first woman to lead a major German orchestra. “Joker” composer Hildur Guðnadóttir will score the picture, while Field is writing and producing in addition to directing. Nina Hoss, Noémie Merlant, Julian Glover, Mark Strong, Allan Corduner, Sylvia Flote, and cellist and Royal Academy of Music alum Sophie Kauer are among the announced cast.

The film is in post-production, but CinemaCon audiences were treated to an exclusive first look at the footage so far.

The footage shown at CinemaCon was brief, albeit striking. A woman (Cate Blanchett with her face obscured) stands against a black background, slowly opening her mouth to let smoke pour out. I know, I know, smoking is bad, but Blanchett makes it look like the coolest, sexiest thing in the world. The shot is presented with a narration discussing how the pandemic has had a massive impact on our culture and belief systems.

“But there are other plagues,” the narrator says.

The narration continues, talking about nature, but the camera remains on this single shot of smoke leaving her lips, and pulsating into a strange form that continues obscuring her face. The narration takes a turn for the intense, and says that you must “stand in front of God and obliterate yourself.” Finally, the camera cuts to a different image, one of a woman conducting the orchestra. Lydia Tár may not be a real person, but whomever this woman is that Blanchett is bringing to life, seems like an absolute badass.

Official plot details about “TÁR” are scarce, but Focus Features says it’s “set in the world of classical music, starring the incomparable Cate Blanchett.”

Focus Features shows the new Todd Field movie at CinemaCon

Audiences got a look at TÁR, the first film from Todd Field (Little Children) in 16 years. Not much is known about the film just yet, only that it takes place in the world of classical music and stars Cate Blanchett. That should be enough. The footage shown at CinemaCon was created exclusively for the event and consisted of Blanchett exhaling smoke in slow motion while a monologue about the nature of power played underneath. 

Borderlands Reaction

On the last day of CinemaCon 2022, Lionsgate has presented their 2022 slate which includes Borderlands starring Cate Blanchett, Kevin Hart, Jamie Lee Curtis, Jack Black, Ariana Greenblatt and Florian Montaneau. There is no release date for the yet. Based on the reports from the attendees, a clip for Borderlands that run for one minute was shown during Lionsgate sizzle reel.

IGN Southeast Asia — The first look at the Borderlands movie was revealed at CinemaCon 2022, and it looks to be a faithful adaptation of the beloved video game franchise. While we only saw about a minute of footage, it was immediately clear that this film is set in the Borderlands universe. From the artstyle to hearing Jack Black as Claptrap to seeing Cate Blanchett as Lilith, Jamie Lee Curtis as Dr. Patricia Tannis, and Kevin Hart as Roland, all the familiar beats from Borderlands are being hit, albeit with a bit of Hollywood starpower being thrown in.

The Hollywood Reporter — The first footage for Borderlands has arrived — and just like the immensely popular video game series, it was spectacular.

The highly-anticipated film, based on the blockbuster gaming series developed by Gearbox Software and published by 2K, got a sneak peek Thursday during the Lionsgate panel at CinemaCon.

Lionsgate showed approximately a minute of electric footage that showcased Oscar-winner Cate Blanchett as she’s never been seen before, in a fire-engine-red wig, toting a gun and fighting her way through a vibrantly colored cityscape. Kevin Hart also appeared as did Jack Black voicing the robot Claptrap that unexpectedly takes a bullet from Blanchett’s gun with a punchline to follow.

SlashFilm — The “Borderlands” footage came as part of a sizzle reel from Lionsgate, which also showcased footage from “The Hunger Games” prequel “The Ballad of Songbirds and Snakes” and the upcoming “Dirty Dancing” sequel. In the footage, we see Cate Blanchett as Lilith in a killer bright red wig, which seems worth the price of admission alone. Kevin Hart’s character Roland says, “Nothing better than a little wham, bam, thank you, man.” There’s a robot (fans of the games will recognize as Claptrap) voiced by Jack Black, who says, “Whoopsie, you accidentally shot me in the face again.”

And that’s about all there was to see! It isn’t much, just enough to give a little tease of the upcoming “Borderlands” movie, which looks like it will maintain the humorous tone of the game.

JoBlo — A small amount of footage from the live-action adaptation of Borderlands was also teased, with Bumbray saying that the colour scheme looks insane. Cate Blanchett stars as Lilith, an infamous treasure hunter with a mysterious past who reluctantly returns to her home planet to find the missing daughter of the universe’s most powerful S.O.B. The footage showcased Blanchett fighting across a cityscape, gun in hand, with Kevin Hart also appearing as Roland and Jack Black voicing Claptrap.

Cate Blanchett “Completely and Utterly Overwhelmed” by Chaplin Award Honor

On Monday night Cate Blanchett became the second-youngest recipient of Film at Lincoln Center’s Chaplin Award. And though Blanchett is a two-time Oscar winner and has worked with Scorsese, Steven Spielberg, Guillermo del Toro and Wes Anderson, among other luminaries, she was “completely and utterly overwhelmed,” she told The Hollywood Reporter, to have received this year’s honor.

“I don’t even know how to express it because you look at the look of previous honorees, and they’re so eclectic, but to a woman, they’re all of them are people who’ve had a deep influence on the American cultural landscape and on filmmaking at large internationally,” she added. “They’re people who I have individually revered, but collectively it’s like entering some sort of strange pantheon.”

She continued, laughing, “Hopefully, I can make it out of the building without them taking the award away from me.”

The honor is Film at Lincoln Center’s second Chaplin Award to be presented in the past 12 months, with Spike Lee receiving his honor in a delayed ceremony that took place in September.

Yet Monday night’s proceedings weren’t totally unaffected by the COVID-19 pandemic. It was announced at the top of the gala that director Todd Haynes, who was set to conduct a Q&A with Blanchett, would not be there since he had tested positive for COVID that morning. Then, the audience was told, presenter Bradley Cooper, who recently starred with Blanchett in Nightmare Alley, was also “not feeling well.” These two announcements, greeted with groans from the audience, were quickly followed by Blanchett shouting from the audience, “I’m here,” which prompted cheers.

The evening featured tributes from Scorsese, Richard Linklater, Hugh Jackman and producer Christine Vachon, who presented Blanchett with her award and shared with the audience that Haynes, though “devastated” not to be there, was apparently still feeling well enough to be frequently texting her throughout the event, wondering what they were doing. Film Comment co-deputy editor Devika Girish filled in for Haynes.

Prior to the gala, Film at Lincoln Center president Lesli Klainberg shared that despite Blanchett perhaps not being old enough for a lifetime achievement award, she had amassed enough impressive, diverse work over her nearly 30 years in the industry to make her worthy of this honor.

“I think Cate really embodies a really extraordinary artist of this time who has worked in independent films; she has worked on studio films; she works on blockbuster studio films,” Klainberg told THR. “The extraordinary variety of directors that she’s worked with, it’s just amazing to think about how many of the finest directors of our time she has been able to work with and all of her projects — we felt that she was also a person who was so active still, still working—this is not intended as an end of your career award.”

As for what’s next for her, Blanchett said she doesn’t have a particular type of project she hasn’t done that she wants to do, but she looks forward to getting a “strange ask.”

“I always think that the job I just finished is my last, and I will finally go and grow orchids in my greenhouse,” she said of her career plans. “I guess if I look back, it’s that I’ve always gravitated towards the strange ask or the ask that’s just an antidote to what I’ve done in some way. It’s an undeniable ask, and the directors I’ve worked with have usually made those asks of me. Not necessarily that I’ve achieved what I’ve wanted to achieve through that role or that production or that they have either, but the ask has been really undeniable.”

Sources: SlashFilm-TAR, JoBlo-TAR, THR-Borderlands, IGN, SlashFilm-Borderlands, JoBlo-Borderlands, THR