Cate Blanchett on the Jess Cagle podcast with Julia Cunningham
Posted on
Jan 18, 2022

Cate Blanchett on the Jess Cagle podcast with Julia Cunningham

Hi, everyone!

Here’s the new podcast interview with Cate with some video clips released by Sirius XM

 

Cate Blanchett in Porter Magazine; & New Nightmare Alley Clips, and Don’t Look Up Still
Posted on
Nov 29, 2021

Cate Blanchett in Porter Magazine; & New Nightmare Alley Clips, and Don’t Look Up Still

Hello, everyone! Feeling ecstatic with this new Cate update!

Cate covers Porter Magazine. We have updated the gallery with the editorials and the outtakes. There are new footage from Nightmare Alley clips, and Vogue published an article on the costumes in the movie. Also, new still from Don’t Look Up has been released.

Leading Light with Cate Blanchett

Few actors have the cachet of CATE BLANCHETT, but what really drives the multi-Oscar-winning star these days? She talks to AJESH PATALAY about choosing projects that provoke, overcoming parenting challenges and why she’s not interested in ‘winning’ the scene

Click image for higher resolution

When Cate Blanchett finds her groove, it’s like a wind catching in her sails – and a wonderful thing to behold. She’s currently in Berlin, where she’s shooting Tàr, a movie written and directed by Todd Field, in which she plays an eminent music conductor. Having just come off a night shoot when we speak, the actor takes a few minutes to revive. Talking about Berlin, a city she adores, instantly warms her up. “There are so many expat Australians living here,” she effuses. “I feel very at home.”

Next, Blanchett moves into enthusiastic discussion about Tàr, in which she gets to conduct (or pretend to) a full orchestra: “It’s been astonishing. Just to be vibrating in that space with that many musicians.” This leads her on to a rhapsody about a National Trust performance that was broadcast live during the first UK lockdown in 2020, for which five musicians in different locations began playing as daylight broke where they were, building from a solo to a quintet. “My husband and I lay there – we’re sort of on a hill…” Blanchett says of the manor estate in East Sussex (which includes an orchard where, naturally, she presses apples in her downtime), where she lives with her playwright/director husband Andrew Upton and their four children. “We just watched the dawn, in russet mantle clad, emerging,” she says, quoting Shakespeare, “knowing there were about 5,000 other people listening to this music. It was the most beautiful gift that came out of the pandemic.”

Five minutes later, we’re on to climate change and Blanchett is firing on all cylinders. The subject is her next release, Don’t Look Up, a boisterous satire from writer/director Adam McKay about two astronomers (played by Leonardo DiCaprio, himself a fierce advocate for climate action, and Jennifer Lawrence) who try to warn mankind about an approaching comet that will destroy Earth. Everyone, from clickbait pundits and tech billionaires to inept presidents, is subject to ridicule in a story that becomes an obvious metaphor for global warming. Blanchett plays a TV talk-show host, a model of artificiality with bleached-blonde hair, blinding white teeth and impossibly bronzed skin. “Actually, it’s a revolting moment when you wash that makeup off and see the sludge going [down the drain],” she recalls. “It’s quite confronting.”

On the environmental matters that inform the film, she doesn’t sugar any pills. “Everyone is trying to be positive, talking about 1.5 degrees of global warming,” she says. “But 1.5 would still be disastrous. We need to be fucking scared… and demand change; be collectively courageous enough to face that fear and do something about it.” The movie, for all its doomsday messaging, is actually a laugh a minute. And there’s a particular thrill in seeing so many Hollywood stars onscreen at the same time. One pivotal scene in the White House Situation Room brings together five Oscar winners and one Oscar nominee: Blanchett, DiCaprio, Lawrence, Meryl Streep (who plays a catastrophically useless president), Mark Rylance and Jonah Hill.

What was it like being in that room? “It did feel like a Last Supper,” Blanchett says, but this was less a measure of the star wattage than of the strict Covid protocols that were in place, along with the film’s apocalyptic plot. Still, she concedes, getting to high-five Streep (which is the extent of their interaction onscreen) “was great”.

At the same time, Blanchett stars opposite Bradley Cooper in Guillermo del Toro’s Nightmare Alley, a period noir set in the world of a traveling carnival that follows the “rise and fall of a liar”, according to del Toro. Many will see the film (like Don’t Look Up) as a response to the Trump era. “I definitely think this was something boiling in Guillermo,” says Blanchett. “[The film] is a real dark night of the soul. You watch a man breaking the rules, getting away with it… and refusing to show sympathy or compassion.”

McKay has said Don’t Look Up was inspired by a litany of “disastrous presidents”. And Blanchett points to other populist leaders, remarking on the common thread. “I’m hoping it’s a white-male ghost dance,” she says. “They realize they’re on the edge of extinction and they’re panicking. We’re witnessing them in their death throes, which is why it’s so aggressive and destructive.” I ask if, on the contrary, such leaders could see a resurgence. “That’s why people have to vote,” she fires back. “And exercise their power. I’m sounding like I’m on a soapbox, which I’m not interested in, but it’s important to not give in. I’m not giving up hope. As I say to my kids [on climate change], if we’re going out, how do we choose to go out? It’s a terrible conversation to have with your 13-year-old, isn’t it? But anyway. We do laugh around the dinner table. That’s what’s good about Adam’s film. You have to laugh.”

Understandably, Blanchett prefers discussions about her work and not to be caught soapboxing. “I couldn’t be less interested in agitprop [or] telling people what to think,” she says. But she is drawn to films that “ask provocative questions” and she isn’t afraid to get behind causes she believes in, such as Prince William’s Earthshot Prize, which awards contributions to environmentalism. She also recognizes how fraught being outspoken in public can be. “You have to be judicious,” she says. “I’ve been asked to do things by people and I’ve said, ‘I think I’m going to be a liability’.” Her presence can derail a debate, she acknowledges, as she draws the focus over the issues.

She also sees how polarized – and mired by point-scoring – public discourse has become. “I’m very sad about the loss of genuine debate,” she says, “where leaders, public intellectuals and everyday citizens try to find common ground, try to understand the issue, rather than try to win… Even in acting, people talk about [how] to ‘win’ the scene. No, we have to make the scene come alive. And we might have to lose a bit here, win a bit there.”

iven how social media is sharpening the debate, I wonder how much that comes up in conversations with her teenage children Dashiell, Roman and Ignatius, and her youngest, Edith. “A lot,” she says. “Because so much of our so-called information comes through social media. I’m old enough to have been taught at school what a primary, secondary and tertiary source is. I say to the children when they mention something, ‘Where did you read it? Who has [authenticated] that? You have to learn how to read an image and article. And if you’re going to share something, you’d better make sure you have checked the sources.’ Of course, they roll their eyes. But when you hear them talk to their friends, I think they’re responsible. My son is studying physics and philosophy, so he is really interesting to talk to about [technology]. I don’t want to become a separated generation, because I also feel responsible for the landscape he is about to emerge into as an adult.”

On to lighter topics and there’s still one question of vital, global importance I have yet to ask: what did Blanchett make of Adele holding her up as ‘her style icon’ in a recent interview for Vogue? The actor laughs. “I was absolutely chuffed! I think she is amazing. So down to earth. Our paths crossed when she came to Australia on tour.”

As for her own style icons, Blanchett cites Iris Apfel and Fran Lebowitz. And her regard for fashion can be traced back to her early years playing dress-up with her sister: “My sister would dress me up and I would pretend to be whatever the costume told me to be,” she recalls.

She’s clearly not lost her appetite for childish play because, when asked to name the role she’s most enjoyed playing across her illustrious career, it isn’t the historical dramas, fantasy epics or action blockbusters that first spring to mind. It’s “voicing a monkey” in Guillermo del Toro’s upcoming version of Pinocchio. “That was hilarious,” she says. “I’d listen to a lot of different chimpanzees, then try everything out. You go back to being six years old. I mean, I have a six-year-old, so [I did] a bit of work with [her] too.” That must have been fun for her daughter. “Actually, she got rapidly sick of my noises,” Blanchett smiles. “Hopefully, the audience won’t.” As if we ever could.

‘Don’t Look Up’ is in cinemas from December 10 and on Netflix from December 24. ‘Nightmare Alley’ is in cinemas from December 17 (US) and January 21 (UK)

Porter Magazine

Creating the Costumes for the Charlatans, Hustlers, and Con Artists of Guillermo del Toro’s Nightmare Alley

Nightmare Alley is Del Toro’s homage to classic film noir, where a character’s alluring façade can mask ulterior motives. Take Dr. Lilith Ritter, a glamorous psychiatrist who attempts to expose Stanton as a fraud before getting tangled in his web of deception. She’s played by Cate Blanchett in full femme fatale mode, and her collection of stylish gowns and velvet capes reveals more about the character than any verbal description.

“Luis designed a reality with his costumes that reflect personality and help tell the story,” Del Toro says. “Leather, wool, embroidery—they all define character and integrate visually to a color and texture palette, seamlessly.”

Ahead of Nightmare Alley’s December 17 premiere in theaters, Sequeira shared some of his costume sketches with Vogue and spoke about bringing Del Toro’s sinister world to life.

Dr. Ritter represents the world of distinguished old money that Stanton wishes to inhabit. Sequeira cites her as his favorite character to dress in Nightmare Alley, drawing inspiration from Paris fashion sketches from the ’40s for Blanchett’s designs. “It was all about working with Cate’s body frame and making her look as beautiful as possible, which isn’t difficult,” he says. The designer culled materials from various archives across Spain, Italy, and the U.K., pulling different types of velvet for Dr. Ritter’s collection of glamorous eveningwear. “There’s one gown that had little brass stitching throughout, so in the low lighting of the Copa, any kind of movement really made the fabric sing.”

Click image for higher resolution and more concept art photos:

Check these two new clips with some unseen clips from the movie.

 

Vogue

Don’t Look Up

Don’t Look Up offers plenty of comedic knives for Trumpism (the title is the rallying cry of science deniers), but it’s also a brutal send-up of the media. Cate Blanchett’s take on a morning show anchor for a show called The Daily Rip is as close to Mika Brzezinski as one could get without being an impersonation. Even The New York Times comes in for a spanking.

Vanity Fair

First Look at Cate Blanchett on set of TÁR; & ‘The Champions’ Movie Adaptation
Posted on
Nov 14, 2021

First Look at Cate Blanchett on set of TÁR; & ‘The Champions’ Movie Adaptation

Happy Sunday, blanchetters!

We have our first look at Cate in TÁR. Also, Cate will be producing and starring in the movie, The Champions, with Ben Stiller who will also direct it.

Cate Blanchett on set of TÁR

Cate Blanchett in ‘The Champions’ Movie Adaptation

Ben Stiller and Cate Blanchett are teaming up to turn the 1960s espionage television series “The Champions” into a movie.

In addition to acting, Stiller is directing the upcoming film adaptation. Blanchett is producing through her company Dirty Films, and Stiller is producing through his label Red Hour Productions. Additional producers include ITV Studios America and New Republic Pictures.

“The Champions” movie, paying homage to the TV show from Dennis Spooner, follows three United Nations agents whose plane crashes into the Himalayas. Upon being rescued by an advanced civilization secretly living in Tibet, they are granted enhanced intellectual and physical abilities. When the agents return to the outside world, they use their new superhuman abilities to become champions of law, order and justice.

“’Champions’ is a long-forgotten gem that will excite a new generation in the same strange and magnificent way that the original series spoke to us. I’ve long wanted to work with Ben — the director and the actor. He is one of the most engaged and versatile directors working today. Anyone who can make both ‘Zoolander’ and ‘Escape at Dannemora’ is a creative force to be reckoned with,” said Blanchett.

Stiller adds, “I’m a huge fan of Cate’s for a very long time. I’m hoping this project will help people to finally take her seriously as an actress.”

The small-screen version of “The Champions” ran in the U.K. on ITV. The series, which consists of 30 episodes, aired in the U.S. on NBC starting in the summer of 1968. Stuart Damon, Alexandra Bastedo, William Gaunt and Anthony Nicholls starred in the show.

“There’s no doubt that we have a superhuman team on board to bring this riveting series to life for a new audience,” said Philippe Maigret, President of ITV Studios America.

“The Champions” marks the latest collaboration between New Republic and Dirty Films through its first-look deal. They previously announced “Queen Bitch and the High Horse,” written by Eric Matthew Brown and directed by Bert and Bertie.

“New Republic Pictures is thrilled to be teaming up with Ben Stiller and Cate Blanchett — an irresistible cinematic spy duo if ever there were one — along with our friends at ITV and Dirty Films, as we reimagine ITV’s fun and iconic 1960’s espionage franchise, ‘The Champions.’ Literally can’t wait,” said New Republic president Bradley Fischer, who is serving as a producer with Brian Oliver. Andrew Upton and Coco Francini of Dirty Films will also produce.

Blanchett is currently in production on Todd Field’s drama “Tar” and recently wrapped filming on Eli Roth’s video game adaptation “Borderlands.” She will be seen next in Guillermo del Toro’s thriller “Nightmare Alley” for Searchlight Pictures and Adam McKay’s environmental satire “Don’t Look Up” at Netflix.”

Source: Variety

Cate Blanchett to lead ‘A Manual for Cleaning Women’ with script by Pedro Almodovar; Preview Interview from Portrait of An Artist; & TAR Updates
Posted on
Oct 2, 2021

Cate Blanchett to lead ‘A Manual for Cleaning Women’ with script by Pedro Almodovar; Preview Interview from Portrait of An Artist; & TAR Updates

Hi, everyone!

We’ve compiled recent news on Cate. We have a preview of Cate’s interview with Hugo Huerta Marin which was published on his book Portrait of An Artist. Cate is also circling the lead in A Manual for Cleaning Women which Pedro Almodovar wrote the screenplay. On TÁR related news, it has finished filming in Dresden, Germany and continues it in Berlin. Cate is also a signatory on a letter calling on Google, Amazon, Fox, Netflix, Disney & more to demand congress to support Biden’s climate plan.

Portrait of An Artist

Portrait of an Artist: Conversations with Trailblazing Creative Women by Hugo Huerta Marin is published by Prestel and is now available in the United States and will be out in the UK on October 5th, 2021. You can pre-order here.

Cate Blanchett leads the project ‘A Manual for Cleaning Women’ with a script by Pedro Almodóvar

This interview was Google translated, original interview in Spanish from El Pais is linked below.

“The actress [Cate Blanchett] loves the script and the shooting would be in English, but we no longer have the rights to the stories,” explains producer Agustín Almodóvar

Pedro Almodóvar premieres next Friday Parallel Mothers, the drama for which Penelope Cruz won the Volpi Cup at the last Venice Film Festival, “and he is already thinking about his next project,” as the producer and brother of the filmmaker told EL PAÍS, Agustín Almodóvar. “It has always been like this, as soon as I had finished a film I was already thinking about the next one,” he explains by phone. But it is not clear that it is a Manual for Cleaning Women, as was his initial plan before the pandemic, and of course before the short film The Human Voice, with Tilda Swinton, and Parallel Mothers, whose script wrote during confinement. As Agustín Almodóvar explains, “it is a question of rights and interests”.

Almodóvar adapted into a libretto – he has been with the project for three years – several of the 43 stories that make up the Manual for Cleaning Women, by Lucia Berlin, one of the books whose reading has most impressed him in recent years. The stories unfold between Texas, Oakland, and Mexico, in English and Spanish. “Two fifths of the script take place in Mexico,” recalls Almodóvar, the producer. “So it could be shot in Spain in locations in the Canary Islands, Andalusia…”. The script impressed who would have been its protagonist, Cate Blanchett. “Although the female character changes profession and sometimes physique, she is always, deep down, Lucia”, explains the producer. Handbook for cleaning ladies it would mark the filmmaker’s debut in a feature length in English, “after happily shooting the short with Tilda, although it is true that it was a small project carried out as a family,” says his brother. Almodóvar had already been offered projects to direct in the US, among them A Nun of Care or The Boy from the Newspaper, although they were commissions and he never felt that they came out organically from him. Julieta even wrote based on texts by Alice Munro for Meryl Streep, before deciding that the story would work much better in Spain and moved it from place and language, losing in the trip to the Hollywood star.

So what happened to Manual …? “The transfer of rights to the book is over,” explains the producer, who specifies his statements in a podcast from Castilla-La Mancha Media.” The script was done and Cate was excited about it.” But when the time came to definitively buy the adaptation rights, with what it involved an economic effort, and in doubt as to whether or not it would be shot, the Almodóvar production company El Deseo decided not to make the payment. “Now, Cate has decided to stick with him. He hasn’t bought the rights yet, he’s working on it, and he would do it with Pedro’s script ”. And then several possibilities would open up: from when the film is not made until it is directed by another director, or in the end by Pedro Almodóvar himself. “In international projects everything is uncertain”, recalls the producer. “If he goes ahead with another director, Pedro would appear as a scriptwriter and both he and I as co-producers”, with which they could even have a voice when choosing who directs the script. “The experience with Tilda was great, and Cate is the same kind of person. However, it is not at all clear that this is Pedro’s next shoot, ” his brother concludes.

CATE BLANCHETT RAVES ABOUT DRESDEN: “IT WAS A PLEASURE!”

The shooting of the film “TÁR” by director Todd Field, with Cate Blanchett in the role of conductor Lydia Tár, ended on Tuesday. Since September 16, the film had been shot in the Kulturpalast and, most recently, in the Palais in the Great Garden in Dresden .

Those involved in the film said goodbye with a lot of praise for the Saxon state capital and the Philharmonie.

“Thank you so much for welcoming us so warmly and generously to your impressive city,” said Blanchett enthusiastically. “It was a pleasure to work with his fantastic orchestra in the Kulturpalast.”

Director Field, who entered the city’s Golden Book during the recording, also spoke in the highest tones of Florence on the Elbe: “Dresden has a world-class orchestra and is a world-class city,” said the 57-year-old. “The Kulturpalast is a place for everyone: from small children who come here and look at picture books, to young adults who simply meet here or listen to music, to concert audiences. In the United States, I have never heard of anything like that. ”

As a special surprise, Todd Field had a letter from leading actress Cate Blanchett with him. She wrote to Mayor Dirk Hilbert: “Thank you for letting us be here in Dresden. You have a world class orchestra! I very much hope that I can come to Dresden again.

Dozens Of A-listers Calling On Google, Amazon, Fox, Netflix, Disney & More To Demand Congress Support Biden’s Climate Plan

As Democratic leadership tries to unite its progressive and moderate wings, a group of 80-plus artists, celebrities and activists called on the leaders of Google, Disney, Amazon, Fox, Facebook and more to urge Congress to support President Biden’s Biden’s Build Back Better plan.

Boldfaced signatories to the group letter included J.J. Abrams, Greg Berlanti, Cate Blanchett, Jack Antonoff, Don Cheadle, Ellen DeGeneres, Selena Gomez, Chris Evans, Jimmy Kimmel, Lady Gaga, John Legend, Chuck Lorre, Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Lin-Manuel Miranda, Sean Penn, Joaquin Phoenix, Billy Porter, Robert Redford, Ryan Reynolds, Shakira, Barbra Streisand, Wes Studi, Justin Timberlake, Kerry Washington and many more. The full list of names is below.

Dear Entertainment Industry Executives:

Climate change has arrived on our doorstep: California is on fire, record-breaking and deadly storms are flooding New York City, hurricanes are devastating the Gulf. This summer alone, nearly one in every three people in the United States experienced an extreme weather event.

Scientists warn that if we fail to act now, every single one of us will feel the impacts, a billion people will be displaced, and low-income people and communities of color will continue to be hit first and worst. Right now, we have a critical window of opportunity to do something about it. And we need all hands on deck to demand that our leaders protect the people we love and the places they live before it’s too late.

Congress has a once-in-a-generation opportunity to invest in a clean, just, and equitable future for all by passing the robust climate action that President Biden called for in his Build Back Better agenda. This legislation will create healthier communities, put millions to work in clean energy jobs, and free us from the fossil fuels that are driving climate change.

As the top leaders of the entertainment industry—one of the nation’s most powerful and influential business sectors—you are needed to lead our community’s call for action and embrace this vision for a better world. The entertainment community has a long, proud tradition of driving societal change. Our industry is already leading the charge toward more sustainable practices within our own businesses and productions. Now is the time to use your influence to shape our future.

Congress needs to hear you demand, unequivocally, that it put forward and pass the most ambitious climate change agenda in U.S. history.

The plan currently before Congress will protect people’s health and clean up our drinking water. It will create a just transition away from dirty fossil fuels and create millions of new jobs. It will protect communities from climate change through investments in clean energy, clean transportation, and infrastructure upgrades. And it will make sure we finally prioritize and invest in the low-income communities and communities of color that are hit hardest by both fossil fuel pollution and climate impacts.

This plan will create a stronger, brighter, and more just America—and we need you to help make this vision a reality.

At this pivotal moment, please lead the call. Demand publicly and loudly that our senators and representatives in Congress pass this critical legislation.

And we pledge to do our part as well. We will use our platforms to remind all Americans: Tell your senators and representatives in Congress that you demand climate action now. Advocate for Congress to take up the president’s climate agenda. And don’t stop there. Tweet. Post. E-mail. Call. Whatever it takes.

Sincerely,

J.J. Abrams
Anitta
Jack Antonoff
Troian Bellisario
Greg Berlanti
Cate Blanchett
Benny Blanco
Dave Burd aka “Lil Dicky”
Camila Cabello
Dove Cameron
Alessia Cara
Don Cheadle
Glenn Close
Coldplay
Jacob Collier
Lily Collins
James Corden
Ellen DeGeneres
Cara Delevingne
Leonardo DiCaprio
Zac Efron
Billie Eilish
Chris Evans
Jimmy Fallon
Finneas
Selena Gomez
Conan Gray
Grimes
Todrick Hall
Hugh Jackman
Jimmy Kimmel
Joey King
Liza Koshy
Lady Gaga
Cyndi Lauper
John Legend
Adam Levine
Kevin Liles
Dua Lipa
Lorde
Chuck Lorre
Julia Louis-Dreyfus
Demi Lovato
Ziggy Marley
Shawn Mendes
Idina Menzel
Lin-Manuel Miranda
Sean Penn
Joaquin Phoenix
Billy Porter
Zachary Quinto
Addison Rae
Robert Redford
Ryan Reynolds
Mark Ronson
Kyra Sedgwick
Shakira
Lilly Singh
Troye Sivan
Barbra Streisand
Wes Studi
Ryan Tedder
Justin Timberlake
Kerry Washington
Sigourney Weaver
Shailene Woodley
Calum Worthy

Source: El Pais, Tag24, Saechsische, Deadline

First Look at Cate Blanchett in Don’t Look Up; and TÁR updates
Posted on
Sep 8, 2021

First Look at Cate Blanchett in Don’t Look Up; and TÁR updates

Hello, everyone!

We finally have our first look at Cate Blanchett as Brie Evantee in Don’t Look Up. Netflix has released the first stills and teaser which features Cate. Don’t Look Up’s runtime is 2 hours and 25 minutes.

We also have some news on Todd Field’s TAR which is currently in production in Berlin. Check them below.

First Look at Don’t Look Up

Click the image for higher resolution:

 

Cate Blanchett to play a chief conductor of an orchestra in TÁR

Production is now getting underway in and around Berlin for Todd Field’s first film in fifteen years, TAR. Led by Cate Blanchett, the first announcement for the long-awaited new feature by the director of In the Bedroom and Little Children was slim on details, but now after a logline was revealed, more of the cast has been announced.

A pair of international cinema’s greatest talents, Nina Hoss (Barbara, Phoenix, My Little Sister) and Noémie Merlant (Portrait of a Lady on Fire, Paris 13th, District), have joined Blanchett in the drama, according to the German outlet Diesachsen. Icelandic composer Hildur Guðnadóttir (Joker, Sicario: Day of the Soldado) will provide the score, with filming confirmed at performances of the Dresden Philharmonic this month.

The actress will play the role of the first woman (Lydia Tár) ever to be invited as chief conductor of a large German orchestra, announced the Dresden Philharmonic. The shooting will start on September 16 in the concert hall of the Kulturpalast. 93 musicians from the Dresden Philharmonic are involved in the film project.

This filming also includes two regular concerts by the Dresden Philharmonic on September 18 and 19, for which tickets are still available. Gustav Mahler’s Symphony No. 5 in C sharp minor will be performed under the direction of Stanislav Kochanovsky. Pictures are shot with the audience – according to the Philharmonie, however, “no close-ups”. Several tents and trucks will be set up around the Kulturpalast for the 120-strong film team.

Source: The Film Stage, MDR

Cate Blanchett in talks for Francis Ford Coppola’s Megalopolis; & first plot detail for Todd Field’s TAR
Posted on
Aug 31, 2021

Cate Blanchett in talks for Francis Ford Coppola’s Megalopolis; & first plot detail for Todd Field’s TAR

Hi, blanchetters!

Great news, Cate is in talks to star in the new movie by Francis Ford Coppola, and TAR is moving along as we get our first plot details and Cate was already seen in Berlin to begin production.

Cate Blanchett in talks for Francis Ford Coppola’s Megalopolis

Breathtaking bets on his vision established him as one of the greatest living American filmmakers and a vineyard magnate. Now, Francis Coppola is ready to put a lot of his hard-won chips on the table one more time to make his epic dream project, Megalopolis.

While the financial configuration is still evolving, Coppola at 82 years young is betting big on himself once again, by sharing the financial risks of a film that will cost between $100 million-$120 million. He is in deep discussions with a stellar cast of actors eager to work with the director of The Godfather trilogy, Apocalypse Now!, The Conversation and other classics, on a seminal picture that is decades in the making.

While some conversations are further along then others, the actors Coppola is discussing roles with include Oscar Isaac, Forest Whitaker, Cate Blanchett, and Jon Voight, with Zendaya, Michelle Pfeiffer and Jessica Lange also among those he is seeking. He will also reunite with James Caan, whose role as Sonny Corleone in Coppola’s The Godfather made Caan one of the biggest stars of that era. This for a big tapestry film that will have many other actors in the cast.

“I’m committed to making this movie, I’d like to make it in the fall of 2022,” Coppola revealed. “I don’t have all my cast approved, but I have enough of them to have confidence that it is going to be a very exciting cast. The picture’s going to cost between $100 million and $120 million. Needless to say, I hope it’s closer to $100 million. I’m prepared to match some outside financing, almost dollar for dollar. In other words, I’m willing to put my money where my mouth is. What’s interesting about that is, there was a documentary about my dream studio, when I owned Zoetrope Studios and I was unafraid to risk everything I had in order to make my dream come true. Well, I really haven’t changed my personality, at all.”

Megalopolis concerns an architect (Isaac) dreaming of a utopic version of New York City in the near future and his battle with the conservative mayor (Whitaker) during a financial crisis.

First Plot Details for Todd Field’s TAR Starring Cate Blanchett

Earlier this year we got the long-awaited news that Todd Field was, in fact, embarking on his first feature film in 15 years after a handful of projects in development never saw the light of day. Following 2001’s In the Bedroom and 2006’s Little Children, Field will return with TAR, a Focus Features project starring Cate Blanchett.

Set to film in Berlin, a casting notice has now revealed the first details regarding the plot: “The intellectual drama tells the story of world-renowned musician Lydia Tár (Blanchett), who is just days away from recording the symphony that will take her to the very heights of her already formidable career. Lydia Tár’s remarkably bright and charming six-year-old adopted daughter Petra has a key role to play here. And when elements seem to conspire against Lydia, the young girl is an important emotional support for her struggling mother.

The casting notice is specifically for Petra, who is of Syrian origin. “The girl was adopted into privileged circumstances a few years ago where she happily leads the normal life of a young school girl,” the notice says. “She is very bright, self-confident and rather mature for her age. She has already experienced a lot. However her positive charisma supports her mother where she needs it most.”

With the makings of a complex leading role for Blanchett, we can’t wait to see Field return behind the camera. It also looks like the reported September start will occur as Blanchett has already been spotted in Berlin.

Sources: Deadline, The Film Stage, The Film Stage – Megalopolis