First look at TÁR and Borderlands shown at CinemaCon
Posted on
Apr 29, 2022

First look at TÁR and Borderlands shown at CinemaCon

Happy Friday, everyone!

Attendees of CinemaCon 2022 in Las Vegas were treated to a first look at TÁR and Borderlands which will be both released this year. There is also an additional article with interview with Cate from The Hollywood Reporter for Chaplin  Awards.

TÁR Reaction

First footage of TÁR was specifically created to be shown at the event on Wednesday (April 27th). The movie is on the upcoming slate of Focus Features and is schedule to be released on October 7th 2022.

Cate Blanchett Smokes The Competition As A World-Famous Conductor

According to Deadline, the film will follow Blanchett’s Lydia Tár, a (fictional) renowned and groundbreaking conductor who becomes the first woman to lead a major German orchestra. “Joker” composer Hildur Guðnadóttir will score the picture, while Field is writing and producing in addition to directing. Nina Hoss, Noémie Merlant, Julian Glover, Mark Strong, Allan Corduner, Sylvia Flote, and cellist and Royal Academy of Music alum Sophie Kauer are among the announced cast.

The film is in post-production, but CinemaCon audiences were treated to an exclusive first look at the footage so far.

The footage shown at CinemaCon was brief, albeit striking. A woman (Cate Blanchett with her face obscured) stands against a black background, slowly opening her mouth to let smoke pour out. I know, I know, smoking is bad, but Blanchett makes it look like the coolest, sexiest thing in the world. The shot is presented with a narration discussing how the pandemic has had a massive impact on our culture and belief systems.

“But there are other plagues,” the narrator says.

The narration continues, talking about nature, but the camera remains on this single shot of smoke leaving her lips, and pulsating into a strange form that continues obscuring her face. The narration takes a turn for the intense, and says that you must “stand in front of God and obliterate yourself.” Finally, the camera cuts to a different image, one of a woman conducting the orchestra. Lydia Tár may not be a real person, but whomever this woman is that Blanchett is bringing to life, seems like an absolute badass.

Official plot details about “TÁR” are scarce, but Focus Features says it’s “set in the world of classical music, starring the incomparable Cate Blanchett.”

Focus Features shows the new Todd Field movie at CinemaCon

Audiences got a look at TÁR, the first film from Todd Field (Little Children) in 16 years. Not much is known about the film just yet, only that it takes place in the world of classical music and stars Cate Blanchett. That should be enough. The footage shown at CinemaCon was created exclusively for the event and consisted of Blanchett exhaling smoke in slow motion while a monologue about the nature of power played underneath. 

Borderlands Reaction

On the last day of CinemaCon 2022, Lionsgate has presented their 2022 slate which includes Borderlands starring Cate Blanchett, Kevin Hart, Jamie Lee Curtis, Jack Black, Ariana Greenblatt and Florian Montaneau. There is no release date for the yet. Based on the reports from the attendees, a clip for Borderlands that run for one minute was shown during Lionsgate sizzle reel.

IGN Southeast Asia — The first look at the Borderlands movie was revealed at CinemaCon 2022, and it looks to be a faithful adaptation of the beloved video game franchise. While we only saw about a minute of footage, it was immediately clear that this film is set in the Borderlands universe. From the artstyle to hearing Jack Black as Claptrap to seeing Cate Blanchett as Lilith, Jamie Lee Curtis as Dr. Patricia Tannis, and Kevin Hart as Roland, all the familiar beats from Borderlands are being hit, albeit with a bit of Hollywood starpower being thrown in.

The Hollywood Reporter — The first footage for Borderlands has arrived — and just like the immensely popular video game series, it was spectacular.

The highly-anticipated film, based on the blockbuster gaming series developed by Gearbox Software and published by 2K, got a sneak peek Thursday during the Lionsgate panel at CinemaCon.

Lionsgate showed approximately a minute of electric footage that showcased Oscar-winner Cate Blanchett as she’s never been seen before, in a fire-engine-red wig, toting a gun and fighting her way through a vibrantly colored cityscape. Kevin Hart also appeared as did Jack Black voicing the robot Claptrap that unexpectedly takes a bullet from Blanchett’s gun with a punchline to follow.

SlashFilm — The “Borderlands” footage came as part of a sizzle reel from Lionsgate, which also showcased footage from “The Hunger Games” prequel “The Ballad of Songbirds and Snakes” and the upcoming “Dirty Dancing” sequel. In the footage, we see Cate Blanchett as Lilith in a killer bright red wig, which seems worth the price of admission alone. Kevin Hart’s character Roland says, “Nothing better than a little wham, bam, thank you, man.” There’s a robot (fans of the games will recognize as Claptrap) voiced by Jack Black, who says, “Whoopsie, you accidentally shot me in the face again.”

And that’s about all there was to see! It isn’t much, just enough to give a little tease of the upcoming “Borderlands” movie, which looks like it will maintain the humorous tone of the game.

JoBlo — A small amount of footage from the live-action adaptation of Borderlands was also teased, with Bumbray saying that the colour scheme looks insane. Cate Blanchett stars as Lilith, an infamous treasure hunter with a mysterious past who reluctantly returns to her home planet to find the missing daughter of the universe’s most powerful S.O.B. The footage showcased Blanchett fighting across a cityscape, gun in hand, with Kevin Hart also appearing as Roland and Jack Black voicing Claptrap.

Cate Blanchett “Completely and Utterly Overwhelmed” by Chaplin Award Honor

On Monday night Cate Blanchett became the second-youngest recipient of Film at Lincoln Center’s Chaplin Award. And though Blanchett is a two-time Oscar winner and has worked with Scorsese, Steven Spielberg, Guillermo del Toro and Wes Anderson, among other luminaries, she was “completely and utterly overwhelmed,” she told The Hollywood Reporter, to have received this year’s honor.

“I don’t even know how to express it because you look at the look of previous honorees, and they’re so eclectic, but to a woman, they’re all of them are people who’ve had a deep influence on the American cultural landscape and on filmmaking at large internationally,” she added. “They’re people who I have individually revered, but collectively it’s like entering some sort of strange pantheon.”

She continued, laughing, “Hopefully, I can make it out of the building without them taking the award away from me.”

The honor is Film at Lincoln Center’s second Chaplin Award to be presented in the past 12 months, with Spike Lee receiving his honor in a delayed ceremony that took place in September.

Yet Monday night’s proceedings weren’t totally unaffected by the COVID-19 pandemic. It was announced at the top of the gala that director Todd Haynes, who was set to conduct a Q&A with Blanchett, would not be there since he had tested positive for COVID that morning. Then, the audience was told, presenter Bradley Cooper, who recently starred with Blanchett in Nightmare Alley, was also “not feeling well.” These two announcements, greeted with groans from the audience, were quickly followed by Blanchett shouting from the audience, “I’m here,” which prompted cheers.

The evening featured tributes from Scorsese, Richard Linklater, Hugh Jackman and producer Christine Vachon, who presented Blanchett with her award and shared with the audience that Haynes, though “devastated” not to be there, was apparently still feeling well enough to be frequently texting her throughout the event, wondering what they were doing. Film Comment co-deputy editor Devika Girish filled in for Haynes.

Prior to the gala, Film at Lincoln Center president Lesli Klainberg shared that despite Blanchett perhaps not being old enough for a lifetime achievement award, she had amassed enough impressive, diverse work over her nearly 30 years in the industry to make her worthy of this honor.

“I think Cate really embodies a really extraordinary artist of this time who has worked in independent films; she has worked on studio films; she works on blockbuster studio films,” Klainberg told THR. “The extraordinary variety of directors that she’s worked with, it’s just amazing to think about how many of the finest directors of our time she has been able to work with and all of her projects — we felt that she was also a person who was so active still, still working—this is not intended as an end of your career award.”

As for what’s next for her, Blanchett said she doesn’t have a particular type of project she hasn’t done that she wants to do, but she looks forward to getting a “strange ask.”

“I always think that the job I just finished is my last, and I will finally go and grow orchids in my greenhouse,” she said of her career plans. “I guess if I look back, it’s that I’ve always gravitated towards the strange ask or the ask that’s just an antidote to what I’ve done in some way. It’s an undeniable ask, and the directors I’ve worked with have usually made those asks of me. Not necessarily that I’ve achieved what I’ve wanted to achieve through that role or that production or that they have either, but the ask has been really undeniable.”

Sources: SlashFilm-TAR, JoBlo-TAR, THR-Borderlands, IGN, SlashFilm-Borderlands, JoBlo-Borderlands, THR

Cate Blanchett podcast interviews; & conversation with Bradley Cooper
Posted on
Jan 21, 2022

Cate Blanchett podcast interviews; & conversation with Bradley Cooper

Happy Friday, blanchetters!

We continue to get awesome interviews with Cate as part of promotion for Nightmare Alley. Searchlight Pictures released new interview with Cate and Bradley Cooper. She also talked about Don’t Look Up and her upcoming projects. Sirius XM uploaded another short video which was part of the podcast interview with them. Listen to the podcast interviews below. Beware of spoilers, especially at the second half of the conversation with Bradley Cooper!

Cate Blanchett on playing a murderous psychoanalyst in Nightmare Alley

‘It’s about unlocking the human monster’: The actor discusses her role in Guillermo del Toro’s new film noir, which takes us into the bizarre world of carnivals

Guillermo del Toro is known for his grotesque creations. In Pan’s Labyrinth, the Mexican director dreamed up a child-eating demon with eyes in its palms; in Cronos, a vampire licks blood off a public bathroom’s floor. For his 11th feature, Nightmare Alley, his first without fantastical elements, del Toro deploys the noir genre to showcase a new type of monster: Cate Blanchett as a psychoanalyst with a murderous edge.

Mixing fraud with Freud, Lilith Ritter (Blanchett) upends the 1940s-set thriller on its painterly head. For the first hour, Stan (Bradley Cooper) toils at a carnival before fleeing with a romantic partner, Molly (Rooney Mara). He then moonlights as a mentalist, faking an ability to read wealthy minds – except Lilith can out-scheme a schemer. In 1999, Blanchett depicted a naïve socialite who’s duped in The Talented Mr Ripley; two decades later, Lilith may as well be renamed The Talented Ms Ritter.

“Guillermo, more than any other director, is fascinated by monsters,” Blanchett, 52, tells me over the phone from London in mid-January. “But in this one, it’s about unlocking the human monster. There’s a dark, monstrous creature inside Bradley that he’s in absolute denial of. My character encourages him to face that monster. It’s a dance of death. She knows that one of them’s going to be destroyed by it.”

Del Toro is the second director to adapt William Lindsay Gresham’s 1946 novel for the screen. In the book, Gresham wrote that Lilith bears “the smile of a well-fed kitten” and laughs with “the bark of a fox”; in del Toro’s screenplay, which he penned with Kim Morgan, Lilith is “an icy woman of indeterminate age”. Helen Walker’s interpretation in the 1947 movie is more of a fake friend – a nightmare ally, if you will.

“Hopefully Lilith is an enigma,” Blanchett says. “Someone who’s completely unknowable. Anyone who’s been in psychoanalysis is desperately trying to unlock the recesses of their therapist’s mind. It’s a magnetic pull, because they seem to be like the Sphinx – they hold the answer to all the riddles they ask you. But in the end, they hold a mirror up to yourself.”

In a jagged, microphone-rigged office decorated like an image from a captcha test, Lilith welcomes Stan into her lair. As she treats numerous upper-class patients, Lilith provides Stan with their deepest, most sordid secrets, enabling him to continue his con; often these exchanges unfold in whispers, both leaning in for a kiss but settling for a flirtatious, breathy conversation that, coincidentally, propels the story along. At circuses, a geek – a performer who bites live chickens – is typically an alcoholic in need of booze; here, the psychoanalyst drip-feeds Stan with sex and romance, knowing he’ll do anything if the affection suddenly evaporates.

Then again, Lilith feeds off Stan, too, because everyone in Nightmare Alley self-medicates. It could be opium, it could be love. “Or maybe it’s acting!” Blanchett interjects. “The set was incredibly claustrophobic. I didn’t leave that office for four weeks. It’s like I was in the Amber Room, buried three storeys underground. Apart from the Copacabana, you never see her outside, whereas Stanley’s out in the world. He’s an instrument. A blunt instrument, unfortunately. She’s hoping he’s a Stradivarius, but it turns out he’s just an Okie with straight teeth.”

Blanchett is both a modern A-lister – her recent credits include a Leo DiCaprio-seducing TV host in Don’t Look Up, and the CGI-contorting Hela in Thor: Ragnarok – and a performer suited to period pieces. Comfortable as a young Bob Dylan in I’m Not There and Katharine Hepburn in The Aviator, Blanchett inhabits Lilith as a classical femme fatale of the black-and-white era. “But normally the motivations of a femme fatale are in service of the plot, whereas I felt with Lilith there’s a higher purpose to it. Stan believes his lies, and my character is trying to unlock the truth in all its terrifying hideousness.”

Because I welcomed Blanchett “into my office” at the start of the phone call, the interview is littered with references as to how I’m the Lilith Ritter of our chat – until I describe Lilith’s voice as seductive and motherly. “Ooh, seductive and motherly,” she says. “Does that say more about you or me? Who’s on the couch now! Well, I think the room’s a psychic space as much as a physical office. It was important to have a voice that felt like it was inside Stan’s head, because he’s in such denial about who he is, what’s motivating him, and his ineptitude.” She also sought to create a hybrid between how people speak now and in the forties. “Hopefully the voice is timeless.”

In 2019, Stanley Kubrick’s assistant, Leon Vitali, revealed that Blanchett did uncredited voice work on Eyes Wide Shut. When Tom Cruise attends the orgy, the masked woman played by Abigail Good was overdubbed by Blanchett. “That happened after the fact,” she recalls. “I wasn’t allowed to see the film. It’s always a strange thing, when you’re asked to voice somebody else.”

So were Cruise and Nicole Kidman, who both recommended Blanchett, searching for someone vocally seductive (the character is nude) and motherly (she also rescues Cruise)? “They didn’t use the word ‘motherly’.” So just seductive? “Yeah. I mean, if you look at the sequence, it’s very strange and dreamlike and otherworldly – and a psychic space. Maybe that’s what they were after.”

In Britain, BAFTA longlisted Blanchett for Don’t Look Up; in America, SAG nominated her for Nightmare Alley. When I ask if there’s a cultural divide, she opts to skip the question and instead emphasise that Nightmare Alley is intended for the big screen. “It’s cinematic,” she continues. “There’s nothing like sitting with strangers in the dark, watching things. A master like Guillermo, having big, big, epic thoughts, in all of this glorious visual wonderment? It’s delicious.” Do people in the UK have a moral duty to see it in theatres? “A moral duty? Uh… OK, I’ll let you say that. That’s a good one.”

However, Blanchett describes Nightmare Alley, and its deconstruction of the American Dream, as a topical film, even if it’s set in the forties. “But it couldn’t be further from agitprop. It’s set in a circus and a world that feels familiar but strange. It provides us with a space, in an entertaining way, to reflect on what’s going on, without having it banged over our heads.”

So if it gets remade in 50 years’ time when the planet is underwater, will it still resonate? “Guillermo might be right for that remake – he’s good with underwater creatures. Look, you can’t view anything at the moment without reflecting on what we’re going through as a species. But this had been brewing for Guillermo and Kim for quite a long time. He’s really obsessed with how monstrous we’ve become when we start to believe our own lies. And that feels like an incredibly resonant theme to explore.”

The Pat Kenny Show

5 Minutes On – Cate Blanchett – “how we’ve lost the meaning of truth”

The Australian’s latest role as a psychoanalyst in Guillermo del Toro’s ‘Nightmare Alley’ has already secured her a nomination at next month’s Screen Actors Guild Awards. The film is a neo-noir psychological thriller set in the 1940s about a conman, played by Bradley Cooper, who starts believing his own lie. Cate Blanchett thinks it’s a theme that will resonate in today’s world, in which she says the truth has been politicised – and the confusion between fact and fiction has created a challenging environment for us all. For 5 Minutes On, she’s been talking to our entertainment correspondent, Colin Paterson, about the film, the future of cinema – and how during lockdown the only way she could engage her seven-year-old in home schooling was to dress up as her teacher and impersonate her voice.

 

BBC

Cate Blanchett on Her Double Oscar Buzz, Skipping ‘Ricardos’ and New Pedro Almodóvar Movie

Cate Blanchett delivers two outstanding performances that are both in the awards conversation this year: “Don’t Look Up” and “Nightmare Alley.” The star shepherds grace and a hypnotic trance that has the viewer hanging on every single word she releases.

With another impressive turn in Adam McKay’s “Don’t Look Up,” Blanchett is a contender in what is easily our strongest field of supporting actress contenders in the last 30 years. Blanchett was shortlisted at BAFTA for “Don’t Look Up,” and also picked up a SAG Award nod for Guillermo del Toro’s “Nightmare Alley.”

Variety’s Awards Circuit Podcast recently spoke with Blanchett about her double dip in the awards arena this season, and having to turn down the role of Lucille Ball in Aaron Sorkin’s “Being the Ricardos,” which ultimately went to Nicole Kidman. Plus, the Australian actor talks about her next project with Pedro Almodóvar and why she thinks it’s important to get back to movie theaters.

In what was reported exclusively on Variety, Blanchett will next work with Almodóvar on “A Manual for Cleaning Women,” his first English-language feature, which she will star in and also produce.

She also discusses her other upcoming movies like “TÁR” from Todd Field, “Pinocchio” from Guillermo del Toro and “Borderlands” from Eli Roth. Another possible project in the works is Francis Ford Coppola’s “Megalopolis,” which she’s been rumored to be circling alongside other stars such as Oscar Isaac and Zendaya. Isaac was said to be in discussions to play Desi Arnaz in Aaron Sorkin’s “Being the Ricardos” around the time that Blanchett was being eyed to play Lucille Ball.

“It became the movie it needed to be,” she says of what ultimately transpired with “Ricardos.” “Those things happen in the right way, at the right time. In the best possible way, you don’t always envisage the same thing; and then it goes on to become a different entity.” As for the possibility of working with Coppola she says, “When Francis calls, you just have to say yes. Because you’re on the epic, life-changing adventure ride. You’re on that roller coaster. I’m ready for that.”

“Don’t Look Up” is distributed by Netflix and is now streaming on the platform. “Nightmare Alley” is distributed by Searchlight Pictures and is now playing in theaters.

 — Variety

Sirius XM

 

Cate Blanchett in Eli Roth’s History of Horror; Earthshot London 2021; & BBC’s Inside Culture
Posted on
Oct 19, 2021

Cate Blanchett in Eli Roth’s History of Horror; Earthshot London 2021; & BBC’s Inside Culture

Hello, blanchetters!

Cate’s episode from Eli Roth’s History of Horror has finally aired. She also appeared in a tiny clip from Earthshot London 2021. And will also appear in the final episode of series 4 of BBC’s Inside Culture. Check the details and screencaptures below.

BBC’s Inside Culture Series 4 Episode 5 – Down Under

This will air on October 22nd 2021, 7:30pm BST at BBC Two and will later be available at BBC iPlayer.

Mary Beard investigates the ongoing history of creative connection and cultural exchange between Britain and Australia and asks what that relationship looks like today.

Mary visits The Box in Plymouth, where the National Museum of Australia’s groundbreaking exhibition Songlines: Tracking the Seven Sisters has just been installed. She will speak to the exhibition’s curator, Margo Neale, about how Songlines takes visitors on a journey across the Australian desert, telling the foundation stories of the country’s indigenous people through the work of their artists. In London, Mary catches up with musician and comedian Tim Minchin as he embarks upon a new UK tour.

Mary also meets creatives and leaders who have lived and worked both in Britain and down under, including the 27th Prime Minister of Australia, Julia Gillard, actor Cate Blanchett and journalist Stan Grant. Playing out the episode with a track from her new album is ex-Neighbours actress and musician Natalie Imbruglia.

Eli Roth’s History of Horror

Cate appeared in Season 3 Episode 3 – Psychics which is now available to stream at AMC.

Screencaptures:

Earthshot London 2021

Screencaptures:

Full Show


Source: Inside Culture

Cate Blanchett stands with IATSE; & new podcast interview for Eli Roth’s History of Horror Uncut
Posted on
Oct 4, 2021

Cate Blanchett stands with IATSE; & new podcast interview for Eli Roth’s History of Horror Uncut

Hi, blanchetters!

Morag Ross, Cate’s make-up artist and friend, shared a photo of Cate in support IATSE – International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees. And a new podcast for Eli Roth’s History of Horror Uncut is out. Cate will probably appear on the third episode “Psychics” of season 3 airing on October 15th 2021.

The International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees, Moving Picture Technicians, Artists and Allied Crafts of the United States, Its Territories and Canada (IATSE) was founded in 1893 when representatives of stagehands working in eleven cities met in New York and pledged to support each others’ efforts to establish fair wages and working conditions for their members.

Today, we work in all forms of live theater, motion picture and television production, trade shows and exhibitions, television broadcasting, and concerts as well as the equipment and construction shops that support all these areas of the entertainment industry.

We are more than 150,000 workers strong in virtually all arts, media, and entertainment crafts, and our mission is to improve all entertainment workers’ lives both inside and outside the workplace.

Source: IATSE

Eli Roth’s History of Horror Uncut

ELI ROTH’S HISTORY OF HORROR: UNCUT brings together the masters of horror to explore the genre’s biggest themes and reveal the inspirations and struggles behind its past and present.

Cate Blanchett is unquestionably one of the greatest actors of our time…and she’s also a horror fan. Cate tells Eli Roth all about it:

First trailer for Nightmare Alley; Eli Roth’s History of Horror Season 3 Appearance
Posted on
Sep 16, 2021

First trailer for Nightmare Alley; Eli Roth’s History of Horror Season 3 Appearance

Hi, dear blanchetters!

The long-awaited trailer of Nightmare Alley has been released with the movie poster! Cate will also appear in the season 3 of Eli Roth’s History of Horror which will premiere in October 2021. The series will feature Sam Raimi’s The Gift which Cate starred in. Lastly, they have recently made Vogue Australia’s June/July 2020 cover, where Cate graced the cover, available in print. Check the details about it below.

Nightmare Alley trailer and poster

Screencaptures

Cate Blanchett to appear in Eli Roth’s History of Horror Season 3

The third season of Eli Roth’s History of Horror will return to AMC on Friday, October 1 at 10 pm ET/9c. The premiere episode will be available early on Saturday, September 25 on AMC+. The remaining episodes will be available to AMC+ subscribers on the same day they premiere on air. The upcoming season of Eli Roth’s History of Horror continues to explore the fun and the fear of scary films – both timeless classics and wildly frightening films that flew under the radar. This season will tackle the topics of “Sequels (That Don’t Suck),” “Infections,” “Psychics,” “Apocalyptic Horror,” “Holiday Horror,” and “Mad Scientists.”

Master of Horror Eli Roth, who also executive produces the series, returns as host with an all-star lineup of interviewees including (in alphabetical order) Cate Blanchett, Margaret Cho, Jeffrey Combs, Jamie Lee Curtis, Geena Davis, Lex Scott Davis, Robert Englund, Vanessa Hudgens, Elliott Knight, David Koechner, Christopher Landon, Meat Loaf, Greg Nicotero, Jonah Ray, Giovanni Ribisi, Jessica Rothe, Madeleine Stowe, Quentin Tarantino, Jennifer Tilly, Edgar Wright, Rob Zombie, and many others.

Episode 303 – “Physics” – Premieres Friday, October 15 at 10 pm ET/9c on AMC and AMC+

What’s the downside of having psychic powers? The idea of being able to read minds or manipulate objects without moving a muscle is an attractive fantasy. But what if those powers showed you things you wished you hadn’t seen? What if people wanted to exploit your gift for their own sinister ends? Worse than that: what if someone with psychic abilities turned their powers against you?

Movies about psychics play on the ego of our species – humans rose to the top thanks to their large, multilayered brains – but they also exploit our insecurities. We understand little about cognition and the nature of free will, and we know we’re just a brain tumor away from radical personality shifts and psychotic behavior. The fear of psychic powers gone wrong is the fear of our own turbulent minds.

This episode features a wide range of psychic films made by superstar creators, including David Cronenberg’s Scanners and The Dead Zone, Mike Flanagan’s thrilling adaptation of Stephen King’s Doctor Sleep, Brian DePalma’s The Fury, Sam Raimi’s The Gift, Peter Jackson’s The Frighteners and Tim Burton’s horror/comedy masterpiece Beetlejuice.

Vogue Australia’s June/July 2020 cover with Cate Blanchett now on print

Fiona Lowry is an Archibald Prize-winning artist and has painted Blanchett to create an image that spoke about the moment in time for both artists. Lowry explored the option of painting her work mid-Covid, and her initial thoughts about anxiety about the future, constant cleaning of ourselves and our homes, to becoming an opportunity for reflection and personal change. ‘My initial thought was to see Cate coming out of the water, reflecting an idea of cleansing and renewal. But after we emailed back and forth about what we were experiencing felt, it became about stillness and the idea of solitude and how it can make us reflect. In retrospect it was such a fleeting moment, and the chaos was still swirling around us, but it was a moment I’m sure we will always remember.’

Cate was photographed by her husband, Andrew Upton, at their home in the UK and Fiona describes how ‘I imagined Cate wearing a Vampire’s Wife dress and wonderfully, designer Susie Cave sent some dresses to use for the shoot. Her dresses are so dreamy and nostalgic, and I had read somewhere that she described the dresses as having a ‘subversive mystery’. I also like my paintings to sit within that mystery and often what painting can do is try to unravel or understand the structure of the underlying dream or mystery that we are embedded in.”

Lowry’s paintings are done with acrylic spray paint and have an ethereal and soft dreamy effect. Cate has described the work as wonderful, matching the serenity of her expression.

If you would like to purchase, you can go to FINEPRINT.

Source: Bleeding Cool

First Look of Cate Blanchett in Borderlands and Official Movie Website
Posted on
Jun 2, 2021

First Look of Cate Blanchett in Borderlands and Official Movie Website

Hello, blanchetters!

Jamie Lee Curtis has teased us the first look of Cate as Lilith in the movie adaptation of the video game Borderlands. They are still in production which officially began last April 1st 2021. Also, check the official movie website link below too.

Jamie Lee Curtis via instagram: Welcome to BORDERLANDS and a secret BTS shot I took of Lilith, our legendary heroine, psycho blasting, vault hunting, vixen with a bad attitude and two Oscars to add to the baddasery in her tool belt, the once and future Queen of EVERYTHING, #cateblanchett Maybe next week, if you’re nice and let them know you want MORE and they don’t fire me for posting this, I’ll post other pictures of Roland @kevinhart4real Tiny Tina @ariana_greenblatt Krieg @bignasty Claptrap @jackblack and moi, Tannis and soon you will get to see the amazing mix of adventure and badonkadonk action and comedy from the brilliant minds of @borderlandsfilm director @realeliroth and game creator Randy Pitchford and the creative teams of @gearbox @picturestart @Lionsgate Arad Productions #shutterbugger

 

Click on the image to be redirected to the official website of the movie: