Additional photos from Chaplin Awards and Articles
Posted on
Apr 28, 2022

Additional photos from Chaplin Awards and Articles

Hi, blanchetters!

We have added some photos from Chaplin Awards and there are articles released the past few days since the gala.

Cate Blanchett Honored by Film at Lincoln Center

It took Film at Lincoln Center (née Film Society of Lincoln Center) 47 years to get around to honoring “the Meryl Streep from Down Under,” Australia’s own chameleon-in residence, Cate Blanchett. To give you an idea of her range: not only is she able to get away with impersonating Bob Dylan and Katharine Hepburn, she gets Oscar-nominated and even an Oscar for the effort.

The Chaplin Award (named for its first recipient back in 1972) used to come with a phalanx of the honoree’s name-brand co-stars, who’d introduce a group of film clips they appeared in, then retire to glitter up the after-party. Times have changed, and the celebrity count is way down.

Todd Haynes, who directed the actress to two Academy Award shots (Carol and I’m Not There, the movie that saw Blanchett’s turn as Dylan), was to lead “A Conversation with Cate Blanchett” on stage, but tested positive the day of and had to cancel. Strike Two: Guest Speaker Bradley Cooper, her Nightmare Alley co-star, likewise was “not feeling well and unable to attend the festivities.”

It fell (upward) to Daniel H. Stern, President of Film at Lincoln Center, to bring this brimming bad news to the Alice Tully Hall crowd. They, of course, responded en masse with a primal moan.

“I’m here!” trilled a statuesque celeb in the orchestra section. It was the evening’s honoree, and the moans turned immediately and memorably into roars of delight. She proved quite enough.

Blanchett was not entirely abandoned on her big night. Several of her directors sent filmed testaments to her considerable worth. Austin filmmaker Richard Linklater, who guided her through Where’d You Go, Bernadette, took it upon himself to do The Big Reveal: that she’s half-Texan, half-Australian. Her dad was a US Navy officer who settled in Australia after World War II.

Martin Scorsese admitted he didn’t just love making a movie with Blanchett, he felt a bit blessed by the experience. (His movie was the Howard Hughes bio The Aviator and Cate was Kate—Hepburn.) “The role called for her to do something that I think is extraordinarily difficult, which was to take a very famous and extremely recognizable person and bring her to life as a character in our film,” he said. “I found out that this was exactly the kind of challenge Cate was up for, and to watch her taking it on was really a learning experience. Did you ever see an actor who is so brave and so daring on the one hand and at the same time so confident in her ability to meet that problem head on?”

Fellow Aussies Hugh Jackman and wife Deborra-Lee Furness chimed in with cheery sentiments. “We were at drama school around the same time, and everyone was talking about Cate Blanchett,” he remembered. “You were, for us, the north star—your courage, your range of the work that you do, your commitment to theater and to your community. You are extraordinary.”

Such testimonials served as punctuation for the film clips that illustrated the depth and range of Blanchett’s performances. After the clips had run their course, the evening went into the chat portion of the program. Co-deputy editor of FALC’s Film Comment Devika Girish, having chalked up an earlier podcast with Blanchett, took on the interview duties that Haynes was to do.

The blast of Blanchett Concentrate in the film clips left the actress a little shaky. “Sorry, I’m still reeling from the reel,” she said as she joined Girish on stage for the sit-down grilling.

The blast of Blanchett Concentrate in the film clips left the actress a little shaky. “Sorry, I’m still reeling from the reel,” she said as she joined Girish on stage for the sit-down grilling.

How has growing up in Australia affected her as an artist? Blanchett greeted that question with remarkable candor: “Artists in Australia are not particularly valued by the government. There’s been a long history of Australians not consuming their own cultural products, so there’s a wonderful lack of interest in what you have to offer as an artist—which is right, because you expect the oranges to be thrown at you, and, when they’re not, you go, ‘Okay, it’s working.’

“If you have a chance to go overseas, you wouldn’t say to Rameau, ‘Thou shalt not travel.’ You do get inside other cultures by getting inside their filmmaking culture or their theatrical practice, or their literary practice, whatever it is. Australia is a very interesting place to grow up in, but I never once thought I would be an actor. I certainly didn’t feel I would be sitting here tonight. I’m sorry if I appear a bit strange, but I am massively overwhelmed about tonight’s honor.”

She pointed to the “Cate Blanchett” sign above her. “I’m not quite sure who that person is.”

Blanchett may have a right to wonder who that person is, given how many richly varied other people she has inhabited on the screen in some 90 films. They all, she was quick to confess, have the same constant: “Fear. Absolute fear. I’ve been married for quite a long time now, and so I can no longer ask my husband. I just turn over and go, ‘Andrew?’ And he goes, ‘It’ll be fine.’

“This notion of working out how you do it, working out who you are or working out your relationship to the work—it’s just nonsense, I think. When things are working, it’s all about flow, and you don’t need to ask questions until the flow stops. If it’s flowing, it’s easy, so you don’t think about the process. I think each project, each group of people that you’re with, each director, each script—reveals everything you need to do. There’s more inconsistency than consistency, but, if there was anything, it would probably be the fear of finally being found out.”

And what keeps Blanchett going back for more? “It’s the conversation with people. I’m not being disingenuous when I say that every time a film comes to an end, I feel profoundly what Liv Ullmann describes of Ingmar Bergman’s last moment on a set. She worked with him on Scenes from a Marriage, and they literally did not say goodbye to one another. He just walked out the door and left. It’s hard to say goodbye to those things. Every time I finish, I think, ‘That’s it. It’s done. I’m moving on to another chapter. There’s so much else to do in the world.’ Then you have a conversation with someone. It’s a wonderful idea. What they’re asking you to do is weird and impossible, and you think, ‘Oh, okay,’ and you do it again. You start thinking about time left.”

This thought led Blanchett to remember the 2010 Chaplin Award winner, director Robert Altman: “Years ago, we were talking about making a version of Mata Hari, and we were talking about dates, and I was trying to wiggle something around,” she recalled. “Do you remember that wonderful documentary that Laurie Anderson made about the face where you split the face in half, and each half projects something different? I said, ‘I don’t know if we can do it in the next six months,’ and he looked at me with the death side of his face, and he said, ‘Cate, I don’t have a lot of time.’ You do start thinking, ‘Well, how much time do I have?’”

Stage
Dinner
Arrivals
Outside

Cate Blanchett, mask with message: “Stop bombing hospitals”

Cate was seen recently wearing a mask that says “STOP Bombing Hospitals”. Last Sunday, she had moderated a Q&A for FOR SAMA — the filmmakers of this documentary are also advocating for the targeted bombing at hospitals to stop. They have started the campaign #StopBombingHospitals. You can find more information about the campaign on their official website.

April 27th 2022 marks 6 years since the brutal attack on Al Quds hospital in Aleppo – an attack you see in For Sama Film. It is on this anniversary that we are launching a global action to show solidarity with all brave medical colleagues who are saving lives under fire.

The international community has failed to hold the perpetrators of these war crimes to account. This is why Russia has been allowed to repeat these crimes over and over again – testing their war tactics over many years and now targeting healthcare facilities in Ukraine.

Dr. Hamza al-Kateab

The actress was photographed at New York’s JFK airport. Always, even on social media, she has been urging people to donate and help those who fled Ukraine due to the war.

The reference to the situation between Russia and Ukraine seems evident, also because Blanchett, UNHCR Goodwill Ambassador (United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees), has always expressed herself clearly on the ongoing war. “As the conflict and tragedy hit Ukraine, the world is watching,” she said in a video posted on the organization’s Twitter: Cate Blanchett has repeatedly called for donations to help UNHCR give life-saving aid to people fleeing Ukraine.

Her appeal did not go unheeded by the private sector which donated $200 million to help fleeing people. “Right now, all eyes in the world are on Ukraine. We stand in solidarity with people who are fleeing for their lives, whose families have been destroyed. We thank the private sector for their overwhelming generosity,” Blanchett said.

Cate Blanchett’s kids totally ‘disinterested’ in mom’s fame

Cate Blanchett’s kids couldn’t care less that their mom is a movie star.

“They have no idea, no idea,” the Australian actress told Page Six at Lincoln Center’s Alice Tully Hall Monday night, where she was honored with the prestigious Chaplin Award.

“I told them, ‘Oh I’m going to New York for 36 hours. I’ll be back on Wednesday…’ One of them is getting an award at school, and they went, ‘Oh, OK, have a good time.’”

Blanchett shares four children – Dashiell, 20, Roman, 18, Ignatius, 14, and Edith, 7 – with husband Andrew Upton.

The “Don’t Look Up” star, 52, told Page Six that her kids are totally “disinterested” in her fame, but “in the best possible, healthiest way.”

Regardless of how her children feel, Blanchett’s accolades are highly impressive and she’s regarded as one of the finest actresses of her generation.

In her years in the spotlight, she’s won two Oscars – for her roles in “The Aviator” and “Blue Jasmine” – and doesn’t seem to be slowing down any time soon.

“I was talking to somebody about the notion of arriving somewhere and how dangerous that can be when you think you’ve arrived. Without wanting to sound pretentious, I think it’s about a process of constantly becoming, like there’s a flow to it,” she told us.

“Every time someone wins an Oscar, there are five or six, maybe 15 other people who were equally deserving. It just happens to be your timing,” she continued.

“But, you know, not being from this filmmaking culture, and being recognized by this filmmaking culture tonight at the Chaplin Awards – such an international set of previous recipients – it’s such a deep and profound honor.”

Film at Lincoln Center Tributes Chaplin Winner Cate Blanchett

Glittering in flowing black sequins, two-time Oscar-winner Cate Blanchett, the second-youngest recipient of Film at Lincoln Center’s coveted 47th Chaplin Award, was ushered to her seat at Alice Tully Hall to resounding applause. As Film at Lincoln Center president Daniel H. Stern intoned the usual litany of praise and tribute to “one of the most versatile and talented actresses working today,” he eventually had to inform the crowd that the two starry presenters of the night, “Carol” filmmaker Todd Haynes (“Ooooh,” groaned the audience) and “Nightmare Alley” star Bradley Cooper (“ughh,” they moaned), couldn’t make the event due to a direct COVID hit, in Haynes’ case. Cooper was under the weather, he said. (A Searchlight source said Cooper’s daughter had COVID.)

A voice pierced the darkness. “I’m here!” cried Blanchett. The audience cheered.

Over the course of the night, between videos of former winners (including Bette Davis, Barbara Stanwyck, Sidney Poitier, Alfred Hitchcock, James Stewart, Robert Altman, and Meryl Streep) and Blanchett stans like fellow-Aussie Hugh Jackman, Martin Scorsese (“The Aviator”), and Richard Linklater (“Where’d You Go, Bernadette?”) who explained how Blanchett was a good ol’ Texas name, Blanchett and others had fun throwing a bit of shade on Cooper.

And later, when the co-deputy editor of Film Comment, Devika Girish, gracefully took over the career interview from Haynes, Blanchett responded charmingly to the younger woman’s queries about running the gamut of characters from Queen Elizabeth and Katharine Hepburn to a Middle Earth elf and Norse villain and working for directors Peter Jackson, Gillian Armstrong, Terrence Malick, Steven Soderbergh, and David Fincher. Like many actresses, it turns out that Blanchett is motivated by a combination of confidence, fear, and going with the flow. And if she’d had another career, she might have studied dance with Pina Bausch.

Finally, Blanchett loves cinema. “We have had a collective experience over the last two years to a greater or lesser degree that has been deeply, profoundly confronting,” she said,  “and dealing with our situation through allegory and metaphor, which is what film is. It has been providing us with a collective catharsis. Our cinema is ripe for an enormous lift, because we want to be together in a room, we want to be experiencing something in the dark together with strangers and with friends, and being united by something that we’re seeing together.”

After a rough weekend, Film at Lincoln Center’s Lesli Klainberg and Eugene Hernandez were relieved that the event went smoothly after scrambling to pull it together. At the end of the night, Haynes’ producer Christine Vachon took on the presenting role. And at the elegant sponsor and patron black-tie dinner at Lincoln Center’s David H. Koch Theatre, Vachon explained how Haynes arrived from Portland, Oregon not feeling at all well. She got him tested, and sure enough, he was positive.

As for Blanchett, these days she just rolls with the punches, she told me, as she looks forward to getting back to work in London on Alfonso Cuaron’s Apple TV+ mini-series “Disclaimer,” about television documentary journalist Catherine Ravenscroft, in which she and Sacha Baron Cohen play the parents of Kodi Smit-McPhee.

Cate Blanchett Says Elon Musk’s Twitter Takeover Is ‘Very Dangerous’

Director Adam McKay’s Netflix film “Don’t Look Up,” which starred Leonardo DiCaprio, Jennifer Lawrence, Meryl Streep, Cate Blanchett, Mark Rylance and more A-listers, made a splash last winter for how the dark, political comedy eerily mirrored real life. The film tackled issues of climate change and media misinformation, and one fictional tech billionaire character hit even closer to home after Elon Musk and Twitter agreed to a $44 billion deal on Monday.

“It’s dangerous,” Blanchett told Variety about Musk’s Twitter takeover, at the Chaplin Award Gala in New York on Monday. “That’s all I have to say, it’s very, very dangerous.”

Rylance’s character, Peter Isherwell, an eccentric tech CEO who profits off a comet hurtling toward Earth, was based partly on Musk, Jeff Bezos, Mark Zuckerberg and Steve Jobs. In “Don’t Look Up,” the comet becomes a politicized and misinformed issue, as Isherwell helps spin the catastrophe into a cash-grab and job-creating scheme that picks up widespread support. After Musk’s shocking Twitter deal, the “Don’t Look Up” character seems even more ripped from the headlines.

“I think the future is often imagined in the mind of the artist,” Blanchett told Variety. “Adam wrote this well and truly pre-pandemic. It was really interesting to see how much meaning an audience brings to a work. If the audience viewed the same script, the same story performed in exactly the same way, pre-pandemic, it would’ve been a very different response to the takeaway than the audience has now. That speaks to the power of the zeitgeist and the times in which we live.”

In “Don’t Look Up,” Blanchett played a talk-show host who dismissed the urgency of the comet disaster live on air. Earlier this month, a “Good Morning Britain” interview went viral after the TV anchor downplayed a climate activist’s serious concerns about the world’s growing oil use.

The Oscar best picture-nominated film was one of many on display at the 47th Chaplin Award Gala, where Blanchett was being honored. The two-time Academy Award winner became the second-youngest recipient of the Chaplin Award. Past honorees include Spike Lee, Helen Mirren, Robert De Niro, Morgan Freeman, Streep, Tom Hanks and other film icons.

The Lincoln Center celebration included several montages of Blanchett’s work, including “Blue Jasmine,” “The Aviator,” “Carol,” “Elizabeth: The Golden Age,” “Thor: Ragnarok,” “Lord of the Rings,” “Nightmare Alley” and more. There were also video tributes from some of her directors and collaborators, like Martin Scorsese, Hugh Jackman, Richard Linklater and James Gray.

However, the celebration was not without a few hitches; presenters Todd Haynes and Bradley Cooper were unable to attend, as planned. Haynes, who directed Blanchett in “Carol,” tested positive for COVID on Monday morning, and Cooper, her “Nightmare Alley” co-star, was “not feeling well,” Film at Lincoln Center chair Dan Stern announced at the beginning of the ceremony. Blanchett was quick to poke fun at Cooper’s absence.

“There’s a few empty seats there; there’s a few people who either didn’t want to come up and said they had COVID or actually really had COVID — Bradley!” Blanchett joked. During her acceptance speech, she went after her co-star again. “I want to thank all those people who’ve been paid to say such wonderful things about me this evening. And to all of those who offered to be here, but couldn’t due to contracting COVID — rest up — or laziness, whatever.”

Sources: The Observer, Corriere, Page Six, Indiewire, Variety

Nightmare Alley available now to stream on HBO Max and Hulu
Posted on
Feb 5, 2022

Nightmare Alley available now to stream on HBO Max and Hulu

Great day, everyone!

Nightmare Alley is now available to stream on HBO Max and Hulu in the US. We have updated the gallery with some behind the scenes photos, FYC campaign posters, and screencaptures from the movie and behind the scene look. The black and white version of Nightmare Alley is also playing nationwide in the US and selected theatres in UK and Mexico. Check out some interviews as well.

Screencaptures

Behind the Scenes


4K Trailer Screencaptures

On the Red Carpet Presents: Nightmare Alley Behind the Scenes

FYC Campaign

Black and White version release

Interview

Star-Gazing: In Conversation With Cate Blanchett

It’s a strange feeling to stare into the void of a Zoom loading screen, waiting for a two-time Oscar winner to join the call. But that’s what I did one Sunday morning, counting the seconds until my interview with Cate Blanchett began. Her schedule was packed—plenty of news services wanted interviews regarding her recent roles in Nightmare Alley and Don’t Look Up, two movies considered likely to receive Oscars nominations—but she found the time for a half-hour audio call.

I take a deep but not quite calming breath as she joins; knowing time is limited, we briefly exchange greetings and begin. The first thing I want to know is how she was cast in Nightmare Alley, a film noir about the rise and fall of Stan Carlisle, a carnival mentalist in 1940s America. In the movie, Blanchett plays Dr. Lilith Ritter, a cunning psychologist who seems to partner with Stan, but has an agenda of her own.

She tells me that she and director Guillermo del Toro had previously spoken about working on a project together; while that original project never bore fruit, he kept her in mind when it came time to cast Nightmare Alley. “I read the script, and was blown away by it, because it felt so distinct and obviously was drawing from deep recesses of not only the novel,” she says (referring to the 1946 novel by William Lindsay Gresham which the movie adapts), “but things that Guillermo and [co-writer] Kim Morgan had been thinking about for a long time.” I agree with her, saying that the movie’s clearly inspired by del Toro’s personal interests, such as his fondness for filming weird things in jars.

Laughing, she tells me that she and del Toro have a shared love of the horror genre—“I was gripped by that all through my adolescence…I now can’t watch a horror movie without peeing my pants”. But Nightmare Alley doesn’t just rely on the sinister visuals that del Toro is often associated with; rather, halfway through the film the setting shifts from a seedy, exploitative carnival to the elegant ballrooms and offices of New York. While beautiful, it’s ultimately an equally dark and destructive realm—“there’s blood in the panels of those walls,” Blanchett says of that setting.

So what makes film noir relevant as a genre these days? There are so many archetypes of the genre that can be used in a sloppy way, Blanchett notes, and a mere replica of its conventions can just end up being a “cinematic history lesson”. But what del Toro has done is to harness the tropes of the genre—characters haunted by a dark past, spaces that are claustrophobic and confining—and show how they remain pertinent to the psychology of the modern world.

Gresham’s novel was previously adapted as a black-and-white film in 1947 by director Edmund Goulding, and while Blanchett likes the film and had seen it prior to signing on to this project, she does point out a limitation in its storytelling. For her, the 1947 adaptation’s characterization of Dr. Ritter felt “hazy”, less memorable than some of its other components—but this, in a way, was useful.

Without the fear of being held back by Dr. Ritter’s portrayal in the previous version, she could put her own spin on the character. “She had to be a little Sphinx-like, in the sense that she’s asking the question, but you sense that there’s a power and weight of experience behind those questions,” she says. Del Toro prepared a detailed biography for the character, which Blanchett tells me was headed by a quote from Hamlet: “I am very proud, revengeful, ambitious, with more offences at my beck than I have thoughts to put them in, imagination to give them shape, or time to act them in”.

However, because she knew that to explicitly show her character’s past would be saying too much, the movie only hints at her true self and history. Blanchett especially praises the film’s production design, by Tamara Deverell, as a means of implying Dr. Ritter’s true nature—“I’ve never walked onto a set that so absolutely represented the character I was playing”. Ultimately, she didn’t want the character to be a stereotypical femme fatale, who sought to destroy men “simply because”; rather, Dr. Ritter had been physically and mentally scarred by a cruel world, and was trying to bring about a twisted form of justice.

But that goal wouldn’t be achieved without Stan Carlisle, played by Bradley Cooper, who her character simultaneously works with and undermines. “I adore Bradley”, she says, as an actor as well as a producer and director. They found that they had similar rhythms as actors, so that performing alongside him was enjoyable even in the darkest and most complex scenes—“it’s a dance of death…it’s a matador and a bull,” she says of their characters’ dynamics.

On the topic of the actor’s craft, does she see acting more as telling the truth or telling lies? She reflects on the question, telling me that for her, ultimately, “acting is revealing”. The things revealed can range from being pleasant to repulsive—“but it’s never, ever telling an audience what to think…I suppose that’s what art is, isn’t it? It does more and resonates more than what it seems to do on the surface.” Maybe that’s why some people think that art and acting is deception, she says.

With this film and Don’t Look Up (a disaster movie by Adam McKay that satirizes the inaction and misinformation surrounding the climate crisis) speaking to the uncertainty of the modern world, I ask her what it’s like to try and make sense of truth in a time where nothing seems to be known. She agrees that it’s become difficult to hunt the truth out, to get at the things that are foundational to a democracy. “I feel for students at the moment,” she says, wondering when it was that truth became degraded into nothing more than competing information sources—in the last six years? since the Cold War? “Certainly in the last four years, that word itself has been so destroyed”.

As for the function of art in general, she says, “I don’t think art is political; it’s wilfully not”. Whereas politics focuses on the here and now, artists have the freedom to look backwards or forwards in time, such as how del Toro’s film uses the 1940s to reflect modern cultural questions back at us. For her, art is a provocation, a space for dangerous ideas: “art is a much more irresponsible medium—it has to be”.

This leads the conversation to current affairs, specifically the experience of making movies during COVID–apart from her two aforementioned projects, last year she finished filming TÁR, a drama film by Todd Field, and is about to begin filming Disclaimer, a seven-part series by Alfonso Cuaron, as well as an adaptation of Lucia Berlin’s short stories, directed by Pedro Almodóvar, next year. Noting the importance of how stories and films provided escapism amidst the pandemic’s stresses, Blanchett tells me that she felt privileged to be part of the film industry. However, she also notes that “there are millions of out-of-work performers, particularly in the live performing arts” who’ve not been as lucky as her and have struggled because of the pandemic.

Blanchett also stresses that the film industry also hasn’t fully processed other key cultural moments such as Black Lives Matter or MeToo, and the need to address these systemic issues in an uncompromising way. “The pandemic revealed just how broken everything was,” she concludes this train of thought by saying, “as you put the pieces back together, the upside is that there’s an understood necessity in our industry to fix it.”

My final question for her is to ask, on behalf of our readers (and myself), for any film recommendations she might have. She replies that while she hasn’t been able to see anything in a cinema yet, she rewatched the 1981 TV miniseries adapting the novel Brideshead Revisited, singling out Jeremy Irons’ performance for particular praise. More recent works she singles out for praise include Long Day’s Journey Into Night, by Bi Gan—recommended to her by her son—the movies of Josephine Decker and Lucrecia Martel, and Pedro Almodóvar’s Parallel Mothers. It’s clear from how she speaks that these are movies she genuinely feels passionate about.

With that, she answers my final question—or so I assume. Because, later that day, she messages me with one final recommendation: “The other film to see is RED ROCKET. Unforgettable”.

Note: We have added the countries where the black and white version of Nightmare Alley is released.

Source: Nightmare Alley, Cherwell

 

Nightmare Alley Streaming Release Date; Behind the scenes and featurette
Posted on
Jan 22, 2022

Nightmare Alley Streaming Release Date; Behind the scenes and featurette

Hello!

Nightmare Alley will soon be released on streaming services in the US. A special behind the scenes look on the movie which is almost 23 minutes long and the featurette on the movie’s cinematography were released. Martin Scorsese also wrote on an op-ed on LA Times on why you should give Nightmare Alley a watch. Like we always remind, beware of spoilers if you have not seen the movie. Enjoy!

Nightmare Alley Will Be Streaming on Hulu and HBO Max in February

Guillermo del Toro’s R-rated thriller “Nightmare Alley” is heading to streaming sooner than many expected. The film, which stars Bradley Cooper and Cate Blanchett, will be available to stream on both Hulu and HBO Max starting February 1, 2022.

The streaming release comes less than two months after the Searchlight Pictures film was released exclusively in theaters, on Dec. 17.

Nightmare Alley Cinematography FYC

In the video, del Toro even offers a clue to his motivation for releasing the whole film, which also stars Cate Blanchett, Rooney Mara, and Richard Jenkins, in a black-and-white version, which opened in select Los Angeles theaters last week. Del Toro and Laustsen shared their thoughts on this version with TheWrap: “I kept saying, ‘Oh, my God, I wish I could do both releases,’” the director raved.

Cinematography FYC Featurettes Screencaptures

Behind the Scenes

Martin Scorsese wants you to watch ‘Nightmare Alley.’ Let him tell you why

A few weeks ago, I caught up with Guillermo del Toro’s “Nightmare Alley.” I was impressed and moved. I look forward to watching anything that Guillermo does, but this particular picture had a special power and resonance for me.

Then I came to realize that people just weren’t coming out for it, which was distressing. Obviously, this past holiday season was a tricky moment to release any movie. But I also wonder if there has been a real appreciation of Guillermo’s accomplishment.

I would bet that the term “noir” has appeared in most of the reviews and comments about “Nightmare Alley,” and with good reason. The characters are all haunted, many are doomed, and the film is based on a novel with the kind of wild labyrinthine plot that is a hallmark of film noir. On top of that, the novel was filmed once before, right after its publication in 1946, and the earlier version directed by Edmund Goulding has long been considered a classic of the genre.

But the term “noir” has been used so often and in such a cheeky way that it seems more like a flavor than anything else, and it might just lead someone seeking information about the picture in the wrong direction. They might be expecting a noir “pastiche,” of which there have been many. That doesn’t even begin to do justice to Guillermo and Kim Morgan’s adaptation.

The majority of the picture takes place in the ‘30s, and it seems to grow out of the bitterness and despair of the depression: You can feel it in the images and in the body language of the actors. All the characters in this film are feeling real pain, a sense of spiritual desolation rooted in everyday life. This isn’t just a matter of “style” or “visuals,” exquisite as the film is. It’s a matter of Guillermo’s complete commitment to the material, to bringing his vision to life with his production designer, his costume designer, his DP and his amazing cast, led by Bradley Cooper and Cate Blanchett. They work together to create a dead-end universe from out of the American past, and they do it inside and out, through and through.

In that sense, the film is truer to the animating spirit of film noir than the many “homages” that have been made over the years and are still being made now. Guillermo is certainly speaking from and to his own time, but he’s doing so in the idiom of a time gone by, and the urgency and despair of then overlaps with the urgency and despair of now in a way that’s quite disturbing. It’s like a warning bell.

Disturbing, but exhilarating at the same time. That’s what art can do.

COVID-19 has also been extremely tough on the cinema in general. It’s added time-consuming protocols and extremely expensive insurance packages to the budgets of all films, big and small. It’s resulted in the closure of many theaters and a resistance to going back to the ones that are still open. And on top of everything else … Omicron.

If you decided to just file “Nightmare Alley” away under “noir” or some other category, I would urge you to take a second closer look. And if you decided to skip it altogether, for whatever reason, please reconsider. In essence, what I’m trying to say is that a filmmaker like Guillermo, who gives us pictures this lovingly and passionately crafted, doesn’t just need our support: he deserves it.

Source: The Wrap, The Wrap FYC, ABC7, LA Times

Cate Blanchett on W Magazine cover; and Nominations for Nightmare Alley and Don’t Look Up Performance
Posted on
Jan 13, 2022

Cate Blanchett on W Magazine cover; and Nominations for Nightmare Alley and Don’t Look Up Performance

Great day, Blanchetters!

Cate is on one of the covers of W Magazine’s Best Performances this year. She has also received her 16th and 17th nomination from SAG (Screen Actors Guild) Awards for both Nightmare Alley and Don’t Look Up. BAFTA released their longlist which includes Cate’s performance in Don’t Look Up in the supporting role category. We also added a behind the scene photo, still, and some scans from Nightmare Alley on our gallery. Check them below!

Critics Choice FYC

Behind the scene and still from Nightmare Alley

The Hollywood Reporter – January 12th 2022 (Beware of spoilers!)

Cate Blanchett Keeps on the Sunny Side

The plot of Guillermo del Toro’s Nightmare Alley could be boiled down to a game of cat and mouse. Cate Blanchett’s Lilith is hell-bent on exposing Bradley Cooper’s Stan as a quack, and she sure doesn’t mind taking the purported mentalist’s girlfriend, played by Rooney Mara, down with him. (Suffice to say, this is not the Carol reunion we envisioned.) For W’s annual Best Performances issue, Blanchett shares how starring in the film brightened her pandemic experience—along with a bit of gardening on the side.

Production on Nightmare Alley was stopped for six months during lockdown.

Yes—and that was fine. I love the project. I saw Tod Browning’s Freaks at an impressionable age, and it was so full of humanity. I’ve always been fascinated by the circus or carnival world. I saw the original [1947] Nightmare Alley with Tyrone Power, and I loved that in the film, everything was a game. [In this version], I play the traditional femme fatale—I draw men to their doom. But I saw my character, Lilith, as a beacon of truth in a perverted way. Someone who was able to excavate the truth from a person who did not want the truth revealed.

The film is set in the world of fortune-telling and “carny” workers. Have you ever had your fortune told?

Years ago, I played a psychic in a Sam Raimi film called The Gift. I’d never even had a reading, so I thought I should. She said some very strange things that didn’t make sense at the time, including that I would have four children. Much of what she said came to pass—and here I am with four children! Part of me wanted to rush back and see her again, and part of me never wanted to see her again. [Laughs]

What were your Covid activities during the film’s six-month break?

I gardened for England! Couldn’t stop planting! We had a derelict greenhouse on our property that we brought back to life. I practiced the piano. And I also watched every episode of The Sopranos, which I had never seen. I can’t look at a screen now—I have PTSD about watching anything at home. I want to be out: in a cinema, a concert hall, a theater, experiencing something with strangers. I miss that communal bond.

Do you think Nightmare Alley has a larger message?

Yes. The more one tries to conceal one’s true nature, the more those tendencies will have an impact on your life. It’s one thing to lie—it’s another thing to believe your lies. (And my character reveals the truth.)

2022 EE British Academy Film Awards Longlist

Supporting Actress

15 performances will progress to Round Two of voting, and six will be nominated. To determine this longlist, in Round One the acting chapter voted; the top 12 were automatically longlisted. The remaining three places have been voted on by the Longlisting jury, who have considered the next 10 placed performances from the chapter vote. Round Two is voted on by a jury who will vote for the six nominations. In Round Three, the general voting membership will select the winner in this category. 202 performances were submitted for consideration.

Caitríona Balfe Belfast
Cate Blanchett Don’t Look Up
Jessie Buckley The Lost Daughter
Ana de Armas No Time To Die
Ariana DeBose West Side Story
Ann Dowd Mass
Judi Dench Belfast
Kirsten Dunst The Power of the Dog
Aunjanue Ellis King Richard
Kathryn Hunter The Tragedy of Macbeth
Rita Moreno West Side Story
Ruth Negga Passing
Vinette Robinson Boiling Point
Meryl Streep Don’t Look Up
Anya Taylor-Joy Last Night in Soho

SAG Nomination

Cate has been nominated for Outstanding Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role (Nightmare Alley) and Outstanding Performance by a Cast in Motion Picture (Don’t Look Up). She is now the most nominated actor in the ensemble category with 7 nominations and 1 win — Lord of the Rings Trilogy (won for Return of the King), The Aviator, Babel, The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, and the latest is Don’t Look Up.

After going virtual last year amid the pandemic, the SAG Awards are returning to an in-person event, though this year’s ceremony will be held in the spacious Santa Monica Barker Hangar and follow COVID safety protocols. The show will simulcast live on Feb. 27 on TNT and TBS on at 8 p.m. ET / 5 p.m. PT.

Meryl Streep & Cate Blanchett Continue Record Streaks For SAG Award Film Nominations

Overall, including TV noms, Meryl Streep counts 19 SAG nominations in her career including noms from such TV series as Big Little Lies (ensemble drama) in 2020 and a 2004 win for female lead actor in a TV movie/miniseries for HBO’s Angels in America.

Cate Blanchett isn’t far behind, taking her SAG nom running total to second place among all feature performers from 14 to 16 today with a supporting female actor nomination for Searchlight’s Nightmare Alley and an ensemble feature cast nomination for Don’t Look Up. In total for her career, including SAG nom recognition from TV roles, Blanchett counts 17 SAG nominations, tying with Allison Janney’s overall count.

Blanchett won three times prior, for Film Best Female Lead Actor (2014 for Blue Jasmine), Supporting Female Actor (2005 for The Aviator) and Ensemble Feature cast (2004 for Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King).

Source: W Magazine, BAFTA, Variety, Deadline

Cate Blanchett in Pedro Almodóvar’s First English-Language Feature; & Nightmare Alley and Don’t Look Up Updates
Posted on
Jan 8, 2022

Cate Blanchett in Pedro Almodóvar’s First English-Language Feature; & Nightmare Alley and Don’t Look Up Updates

Happy weekend, Blanchetters!

Cate will produce and star in Pedro Almodóvar’s First English-Language Feature — A Manual for Cleaning Women. She also appeared on #FallonTonight last Wednesday to promote Nightmare Alley. We updated the FYC Campaign folder and uploaded the scans from latest issue of Total Film with a short interview with Cate. You can also check a behind the scene footage from the movie. The conversation with cast of Don’t Look Up is also out. Check them below. Beware of spoilers!

We would like to thank Susann for her donation to the site!

Cate Blanchett to Star in Pedro Almodóvar’s First English-Language Feature ‘A Manual for Cleaning Women’

Cate Blanchett has officially signed on to star in Pedro Almodóvar’s first English-language feature film, “A Manual for Cleaning Women.”

The film is an adaptation of Lucia Berlin’s short story collection of the same name, which includes 43 stories about women in multiple types of demanding jobs.

It was confirmed to Variety exclusively that the project is in the early stages of development, with Blanchett’s production company Dirty Films producing the feature for New Republic Pictures, in association with El Deseo. Andrew Upton and Coco Francini are producing alongside Blanchett for Dirty Films. Brian Oliver and Bradley Fischer are producing for New Republic Pictures alongside Almodóvar.

Almodóvar spoke with Variety for our “Up Next” series in December about the project, saying he was writing the script in Spanish before translating it to English.

FYC

Total Film – January 2022

The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon

Screencaptures

Screencaptures

Special behind-the-scenes look at powerful casting in Guillermo del Toro’s ‘Nightmare Alley’

Adam McKay + Cast In Conversation for Don’t Look Up

Source: Variety, ABC7

Conversation with the Cast of Nightmare Alley
Posted on
Dec 27, 2021

Conversation with the Cast of Nightmare Alley

Good day, Blanchetters!

An hour conversation with the cast of Nightmare Alley moderated by Laura Dern has been released. Watch below.

Warning: There are spoilers in the conversation

To follow up his Best Picture-winning “The Shape of Water,” Guillermo Del Toro pulled together an enviable ensemble of accomplished A-list actors for the noirish 1930s drama, “Nightmare Alley.” Adapted from the 1946 novel, the film tracks the hubristic rise of drifting con artist Stanton Carlisle (Bradley Cooper, also a producer on the project). Carlisle parlays a show-stopping mentalist act to ascend from itinerant carnival sideshows to Chicago high society. From carnies to the upper-crust, the vibrant characters that move throughout Carlisle’s orbit will test his mettle and his moral compass.

Cooper, in particular, delves into the personal and creative kinship developed with Del Toro, as COVID delays allowed for extended prep work. The movie provided numerous firsts for the actor-producer, including the vulnerability of filming an intimate scene with Toni Collette’s veteran seer character, Zeena. Cate Blanchett, who portrays a frosty psychoanalyst keen to Carlisle’s deceptions, details how she situated a ‘laser-focused’ part within Del Toro’s collective vision. She recalls a crucial one-on-one scene with Carlisle: “You were amazing, Bradley. It was like suddenly the temperature dropped. All I had to do was let it come out of you; I didn’t have to do anything!” The candid chat among peers offers a fascinating glimpse into masterful creative processes—resulting in a film that exceeds the sum of its considerable parts.

In this mega-starry group chat organized by Searchlight, Laura Dern moderates a sprawling discussion with the bulk of the principal cast, including Cooper, Blanchett, Rooney Mara, Toni Collette, Willem Dafoe, Richard Jenkins, David Strathairn, Mary Steenburgen, and Ron Perlman. With evident warmth and mutual respect, each actor shares their experiences collaborating with Del Toro to nail their role in his meticulously realized world

Source: Backstage

Conversation with Cate Blanchett; Nightmare Alley Clip and Featurette
Posted on
Dec 22, 2021

Conversation with Cate Blanchett; Nightmare Alley Clip and Featurette

Hello, everyone!

A new interview between Cate and Pete Hammond from Deadline has been released plus Nightmare Alley clips and featurettes. Costume designer, Luis Sequiera also talked about working with Cate in Nightmare Alley.

Costume designer Luis Sequeira speaks to L’OFFICIEL about outfitting Cate Blanchett

Guillermo del Toro’s new film, Nightmare Alley, sees Bradley Cooper as con man Stan Carlisle, who learns the tricks of faking clairvoyance at a rundown carnival. His ambitions take him and his girlfriend Molly, played by Rooney Mara, to the big city, where his drive for fame and fortune become entwined with the delusions of his act, leading to dangerous consequences. Cate Blanchett, Toni Colette, and Willem Dafoe round out the stellar cast.

Based on a William Lindsay Gresham novel from 1946 that was made into a film noir the following year, the dark story returns to the big screen in an adaptation that retains a vintage quality. This is largely thanks to costumes by Luis Sequeira, who reunites with del Toro following their Academy Award-winning work on 2017’s The Shape of Water, which snagged four Oscars, including Best Picture, and was nominated in nine other categories, including Best Costume Design. 

L’O: The other character who perhaps has the most striking costumes is Dr. Lilith Ritter, played by Cate Blanchett. How closely did you work with Cate to create her wardrobe?

LS: I’ve collected a lot of references in hopes of doing a ’30s movie one day. So I had a pair of sketchbooks that I had collected some years ago and we looked through those. There are specific details to that two year period that we both felt was right for the character. I was also lucky to have her in Toronto filming Miss America and we were able to have a preliminary measurement-taking and create a block for her, which was quite instrumental. We created the suits, blouses, and dresses knowing exactly what the fit was, which you don’t often have. You get an actor a few weeks before they go to camera and you’re trying to get it all together very quickly. With this film, we had the luxury to have a bit of time to really refine those lines.

L’O: The fit really is impeccable, and it shows on-screen.

LS: Here’s the thing about Cate. She knows how to wear the clothing. It didn’t wear her, she wore it. And then she moved; I was quite taken in the fitting when she would kind of doing some movement to feel how the clothing felt in the way she would recline, or the way she would sit. And that would inform us about how tight we could go without being too tight or was there gonna be a problem when you foreshorten the front of your body when you sit, so that suit had to sit pretty in a very distinctive way to not buckle up. Those are all things that were really helpful from the standpoint of Cate and I working those things out in the fitting room.

Source: L’Officiel

Cate Blanchett AACTA International Nomination; 032c Magazine Photos; & New Interview and Nightmare Alley Featurette
Posted on
Dec 19, 2021

Cate Blanchett AACTA International Nomination; 032c Magazine Photos; & New Interview and Nightmare Alley Featurette

Hi, Blanchett fans!

Cate has been nominated at the AACTA International for her performance in Don’t Look Up. A new Nightmare Alley featurette has been released. Check out some of the photos from 032C photoshoot below.

AACTA International Nomination

The 2021 AACTA International Awards will be presented virtually at 7 a.m. AEDT on Thursday, Jan. 27 (12 p.m. PT on Wednesday January 26).

Nightmare Alley Featurette

Screencaptures

A double dose of the great Cate for the holidays

This morning I had the opportunity to interview Cate Blanchett, whose latest film Nightmare Alley opens today. I got to see that in a packed preview screening earlier this month at the spectacular Academy Museum theater and it looked stunning (not sure howI would have reviewed its considerable visual glories off a link). I brought up the fact that it is so great to see this Guillermo del Toro film opening exclusively in theaters, and it is great to see people going back, however cautiously.

“It is crazy times but I doubt there is going to be a non-crazy time in the near future,” she said. “I really think people, well I can speak for myself, but I think the one thing I missed, even though we are not out of the woods yet, the one thing I missed in the epicenter of the pandemic was gathering in the dark with strangers, because it does add to the experience when other people you don’t know are all joined in that experience.”

Blanchett had high praise for her director, working with del Toro for the first time, saying, “Guillermo is a singular filmmaking creature. There is no one like him making movies.” This two-time Oscar winner has obviously worked with a lot of great directors, so that is saying something.

Nightmare Alley is a delicious period film noir in which the psychiatrist she portrays goes toe to toe on the dark side with a devious Bradley Cooper in this remake of the 1947 Tyrone Power classic and reimagining of the controversial book that came out in 1946. It is a film that has strong entertainment value but also a timely message. In some ways you could say, even though this film is set in 1939 and early ’40s, it talks about things Blanchett thinks are a global problem today, including the Big Lie.

“It is a big problem today, this relationship with the truth, and something that obviously the film deals with absolutely is the most dangerous part is when the liar starts to believe the lie,” she said. “It is sort of relevant to the old Soviet era, the systems we labored under, where we know they are lying, they know that we know and don’t give a damn, and we don’t give a damn either…I think it is very nightmarish.”

Usually film noir is in black and white, but this was shot in color. However, as we were chatting this morning I told Blanchett, who was Zooming in from England, that it was just announced there will be a special black-and-white version of the movie released to select theaters in January. I for one can’t wait. “Guillermo talked about it when we were shooting saying ‘Oh maybe this should be in black and white but they’ll kill me,’ but it is so great they finally are getting to do that,” she said. “I don’t enjoy watching myself on screen, but I loved watching this movie so I will queue up and buy a ticket.”

Blanchett not only has Nightmare Alley this holiday season, but also the hilarious, timely and pertinent Don’t Look Up, the all-star Adam McKay comedy in theaters and hitting Netflix next week. The pic uses the premise of an impending comet about to destroy Earth as a wry comment on the lack of urgency by many for the distinct dangers of climate change.

I wondered if she was now picking movies like these two that not only have great entertainment value, but also have something important to say; both films were nominated this week for Best Picture by the Critics Choice Association. “It is very rare that two movies come along like this in relatively quick succession and you get to be a part of it,” she said. “Both of them have such exceptional casts, with two incredibly distinctive directorial voices, and you’ve got all of these people working at the top of their game in films that deal with very contemporary relevant issues but doing it in a way through allegory and metaphor and satire, so that there’s no agitprop preaching quality to either film at all. They are there to hold the audience’s hand and entertain them and hopefully leave them feeling more deeply, connecting maybe. It is very rare. I feel pretty blessed to have been a small part of both.”

032c Magazine

Source: Variety, Deadline

Cate Blanchett To Receive Honorary Cesar Award; Good Morning America Appearance; & more Nightmare Alley updates
Posted on
Dec 17, 2021

Cate Blanchett To Receive Honorary Cesar Award; Good Morning America Appearance; & more Nightmare Alley updates

Happy Friday, everyone! Nightmare Alley is now released in US cinemas.

We have some ecstatic news! Cate is to be honored with an honorary César award next year. She also appeared on Good Morning America to promote Nightmare Alley, and we have the latest issue of Sight and Sound which featured the movie. She will be a guest on The Graham Norton Show next year. Check the updates below.

Cate Blanchett To Receive Honorary Cesar Award

Australian actress Cate Blanchett will receive French cinema’s top honor, the César d’Honneur, a lifetime achievement award, from the French Film Academy.

The French academy on Friday said it had picked the two-time Oscar winner to be the 2022 César d’Honneur winner. Blanchett will receive the prize in Paris on Friday, Feb. 25 as part of the 47th César ceremony, France’s equivalent to the Academy Awards.

In a statement, the academy said the 2022 honoree had an “absolutely remarkable career and personality.”

Blanchett is among the most successful and acclaimed actors of her generation. Since her international breakthrough as the titular Queen in Shekhar Kapur’s Elizabeth (1998), a role that earned her a best actress nomination at the Oscars, as well as best actress, wins at the BAFTAs and Golden Globes, Blanchett has been a force on the global cinema scene. Alongside her two Oscar-winning performances — in 2005 in the best-supporting actress category for playing Katharine Hepburn in Martin Scorsese’s Aviator and for best actress in 2014 for Woody Allen’s Blue Jasmine — Blanchett has collected a trophy case of awards and nominations, among them the best actress honor in Venice for playing Bob Dylan in Todd Haynes’ I’m Not There (2007) and BAFTAs for both Aviator and Blue Jasmine (for best supporting and best lead actress, respectively).

Good Morning America

Cate Blanchett on The Graham Norton Show

Cate will be a guest on the 14th episode of Series 29 which will air on January 14th 2022 at 10:35pm (London time).

Comedy superstar Ricky Gervais, promoting the third series of his black comedy-drama After Life; Oscar winner Cate Blanchett, starring in film noir remake Nightmare Alley; top TV duo Ant and Dec, hosting new ITV game show Ant & Dec’s Limitless Win; and musical guest Elvis Costello and the Imposters, who perform their new single Paint the Red Rose Blue.

Black and White Version of Nightmare Alley to be released for a limited run

Guillermo del Toro’s “Nightmare Alley” is already getting a rerelease in a special new format. Los Angeles audiences will get the chance to see Del Toro’s ’40s noir film in black & white.

Searchlight Pictures will host a limited run engagement for “Nightmare Alley: Vision and Darkness and Light,” which will be a black & white print of the film screened on 35mm film stock.

The black & white version of the film will run in select repertory and specialty theaters across LA in January, following the film’s release on Dec. 17.

“Although we shot ‘Nightmare Alley’ in color, we lit it as if it were black & white,” del Toro said in a statement. “You can see exactly the same level of design, and we wanted to give viewers this special vantage as a take of the classic noir genre that the film is part of.”

“As a cinematographer, it is a total privilege, a huge artistic satisfaction and a dream come through to have the possibility to tell Guillermo’s amazing story first in a rich and colorful version and then in this beautiful black & white version as well,” added “Nightmare Alley’s” director of photography Dan Laustsen. “When we designed and shot we were always thinking color and black & white. The classic lighting I have used is an homage to all the incredible masters of cinematography who have inspired me.”

Below, you can find a list of where and when to watch the black and white print of “Nightmare Alley.”
– The New Beverly Cinema on January 15 and 16 – Beverly Blvd, Los Angeles
– AMC The Grove from January 14 through 20 – The Grove Drive, Los Angeles
– The Landmark from January 14 through 20 – W Pico Blvd, West Los Angeles
– The Los Feliz Theater, American Cinematheque, from January 21 through 23 – N Vermont Ave, East Los Angeles

Anatomy of a Scene: Nightmare Alley

(SPOILER – a clip from Nightmare Alley) The sequence features Cooper as Stan, a carny who has moved to the city to perform his mentalism and clairvoyance act with his professional and romantic partner, Molly (Rooney Mara). Stan is blindfolded but able to guess the objects that belong to audience members.

One attendee has doubts about the act. Lilith (Cate Blanchett) believes that Stan and Molly are using verbal signals. Narrating the scene, the director Guillermo del Toro discusses how he sets up the cat-and-mouse game between Lilith and Stan, partly by the way he shines searchlights on them, and partly by how he positions them within the performance space.

 

Sight and Sound – Winter 2021-22 – Vol 32 Issue 1

Guillermo Del Toro Found ‘Nightmare Alley’s’ Godzilla In Cate Blanchett

Guillermo Del Toro is not as prolific as some of his peers when it comes to feature films, but it’s still somewhat surprising it’s taken this long for him to work with Cate Blanchett. They both had their breakthrough moments in the mid-to-late-1990s and Blanchett could have easily stepped into the worlds of any “Hellboy” movie, “The Shape of Water,” or “Crimson Peak” without a second glance. Thankfully, the pair have finally collaborated in Del Toro’s latest epic, “Nightmare Alley,” and the result is, well, electric.

Interviewer: I think I was smiling underneath my mask during the entire scene when Bradley and Cate’s character’s meet for the first time. Kate is just killing it. It’s one of the best scenes from an actress or actor I’ve seen in a long time. How did you know that Cate would be so electric with Bradley in this role?

GDT: Well, we talked. Cate and I had developed a project together in the past, that was a noir TV series. And we were very interested in working in that world together. And it never came to pass, but I knew that this was in her by everything [she’d done before]. It’s sort of indicated by when she plays “Carol” or she plays a harder edge character, more self-contained character. But I thought even in “Blue Jasmine” when she’s playing the wife of Alec Baldwin, there are moments there that indicate that flintiness. That was interesting. And I wrote it with that in mind with Kim. Kim And I agreed that we were writing it for Cate. And I approached her and I said to Bradley, “Look, King Kong, I need to get you your Godzilla.” And I knew that I needed somebody of that stature to, what has been up until then, a guy that has run on unopposed for half the movie. And you need to feel when the vineyard comes in. And the other thing is, very important here, is the ramp of the movie needs to be slow, but continuous. And you need to feel “O.K.. I get the world, I get the act. I get the guy. Now what?” And the answer to “Now what?” Is Lilith, it’s Cate.

In Nightmare Alley, Art Deco Furniture Stars Alongside Cate Blanchett and Bradley Cooper

Nightmare Alley is classic film noir with a modern-day twist. It was key for the film’s director Guillermo del Toro to create a spicy adaptation of William Lindsay Gresham’s 1946 novel that reveals the corrupt underbelly of showbiz and the American Dream.

With nods to Old Hollywood, the film follows Stanton Carlisle (Bradley Cooper), a down and out carnival magnate who cons the rich with his cunning ways. He meets Lilith Ritter (Cate Blanchett), a psychologist, who helps him, but inevitably traps him. The film, which hits theatres December 17, looks like a 20th-century Edward Hopper painting draped in shadowy gloom. There is Art Deco furniture, a 1920s carnival, and vintage accents that feel fresh. In other words, it doesn’t look like a dusty antique shop.

Tamara Deverell, the film’s production designer, says that Del Toro didn’t use CGI (except for falling snow and flying bullets) because he wanted all the sets to have real architecture and props. “We created a contemporary version of a noir film—a Guillermo del Toro version, which has its own visual range and parameters,” says Deverell, who previously worked on Star Trek: Discovery.

One key piece is Blanchett’s office, which was inspired by furniture in the Brooklyn Museum’s Weil-Worgelt Study, an Art Deco study designed by Henri Redard in the 1920s for a wealthy client. “I wanted to keep it reflective, sharp, and with clean lines,” Deverell says. “It’s a combination of straight Art Deco lines and curves, which is very much a Guillermo thing.”

The architecture helped define each character in the film, like Blanchett’s golden hued-office with angelic light, as her character sometimes makes heroic gestures. “We mostly see Lilith in her office, so we wanted to make it the setting of a powerful woman, the woman who out-cons the con man,” Deverell says. “She’s smarter, more beautiful, and more sinister than Stan.”

Blanchett was blown away by her office, which featured Art Deco chairs with “amazing angular lines that remind me of Cate,” Vieau says. The Oscar-winner actress expressed her admiration to Deverell while decked out in her 1930s-style hair and makeup. “I was speechless,” the production designer says. “It was a tricky set, but her office gave her so much character.

Source: THR, Architectural Digest, BBC One, The Playlist, The Wrap

Nightmare Alley and Don’t Look Up Updates
Posted on
Dec 15, 2021

Nightmare Alley and Don’t Look Up Updates

Hi, blanchetters!

We’ve made some updates with the gallery — screencaptures, behind the scenes, stills, FYC campaigns for both Nightmare Alley and Don’t Look Up have been added to their respective folders. There’s also new featurette and clips released as we are nearing the US release (December 17th) of Nightmare Alley. Check them below.

Cate on GMA

According to ABC News Public Relations Cate is set to appear on Good Morning America on December 17th as part of the promotion for Nightmare Alley.

Friday, Dec. 17—Actress Marisa Tomei (“Spider-Man No Way Home”); actress Cate Blanchett (“Nightmare Alley”); 12 Days of Cookies with Trisha Yearwood

Nightmare Alley Updates

HBO First Look: Nightmare Alley which is a 12-minute behind the scene look on the Guillermo Del Toro’s Nightmare Alley is now available on HBO Max in the US. Here’s Cate’s commentary and Lilith behind the scenes/clips.

Screencaptures

Behind the scenes

Stills

Critics Choice and Screen Actors Guild Awards FYC Campaign

 

Cate has been nominated for Best Supporting Actress from two different critics associations for her portrayal of Dr. Lilith Ritter

Don’t Look Up News

The cast of Don’t Look Up has been nominated for Best Acting Ensemble in the 27th annual Critics Choice Awards. The ceremony will be held on Sunday, January 9, 2022 and will be broadcast live on The CW television network.

BEST ACTING ENSEMBLE

Belfast

Don’t Look Up

The Harder They Fall

Licorice Pizza

The Power of the Dog

West Side Story

Source: ABC, Critics Choice