Additional Photos from Pinocchio London Film Festival premiere
Posted on
Oct 16, 2022

Additional Photos from Pinocchio London Film Festival premiere

Hello, Blanchett fans!

We have added more photos from the world premiere of Pinocchio.

On October 17th, Cate Blanchett is set to participate at AIB Sustainability Conference. You can find the info on how to register for the virtual event here.

BFI London Film Festival – Pinocchio Premiere

66th BFI London Film Festival – Pinocchio Premiere Red Carpet
 
66th BFI London Film Festival – Pinocchio Premiere
 

TÁR to go to Venice & The School for Good and Evil Release Date
Posted on
Jul 22, 2022

TÁR to go to Venice & The School for Good and Evil Release Date

Happy Friday!

Some great news today, our most anticipated Cate movie this year – TÁR, will have it’s world premiere at the 79th Venice Film Festival. You can also follow the movie’s official social media accounts below. The School for Good and Evil where Cate is the narrator will drop on Netflix on October 21st 2022.

Cate Blanchett Set to Bring New Movies to Venice

Focus Features will be on the Lido with Todd Field’s “Tár,” which teams the “In the Bedroom” director with Cate Blanchett as the fictional Lydia Tár, one of the world’s greatest conductors and the first female conductor of a major German orchestra. Blanchett is a Venice regular who presided over the festival’s main jury in 2020.

Full line up of movies premiering at this year’s festival will be unveiled on July 26th with screening schedule to be released at the middle of August. The festival will run from August 31st to September 10th 2022.

You can followmovie for updates on both instagram and twitter.

Click image to follow

The School for Good and Evil

 

First Look at Guillermo del Toro’s Pinocchio
Posted on
Jun 14, 2022

First Look at Guillermo del Toro’s Pinocchio

Hello! Vanity Fair has released the first look at Guillermo Del Toro’s stop-motion animated version of Pinocchio. Cate is voicing a monkey named Spazzatura, the lead puppeteer of one of the main villains in the movie, Count Volpe.

Guillermo del Toro’s Pinocchio tells this truth about its otherworldly title character: he can be a little unsettling, or even scary, before you get to know him. In the Oscar-winning filmmaker’s upcoming stop-motion animated movie from Netflix, even Geppetto gets the willies when he first encounters the cheerful wooden boy clamoring around his workshop. A hallmark of del Toro’s storytelling, from Pan’s Labyrinth to Hellboy to his best-picture-winning The Shape of Water, is that beings who are initially seen as freakish, or frightening or unnatural, are often even more humane and sympathetic than the seemingly normal people who fear or scorn them.

The director always brings a slight chill before warming the heart, so his take on the living puppet comes from a gothic direction. “I’ve always been very intrigued by the links between Pinocchio and Frankenstein,” del Toro tells Vanity Fair for this exclusive first look. “They are both about a child that is thrown into the world. They are both created by a father who then expects them to figure out what’s good, what’s bad, the ethics, the morals, love, life, and essentials, on their own. I think that was, for me, childhood. You had to figure it out with your very limited experience.”

Despite that monstrous inspiration, Del Toro’s movie was crafted to be family friendly. He knows it will be challenging, but hopes his Pinocchio connects across generations and brings out a sense of compassion. “These are times that demand from kids a complexity that is tremendous. Far more daunting, I think, than when I was a child. Kids need answers and reassurances.… For me, this is for both children and adults that talk to each other. It tackles very deep ideas about what makes us human.”

His approach to this story is a significant departure from what audiences have seen previously in movies about the puppet who yearns to be a real boy.  In this version, “real” is a given. “To me, it’s essential to counter the idea that you have to change into a flesh-and-blood child to be a real human,” del Toro says. “All you need to be human is to really behave like one, you know? I have never believed that transformation [should] be demanded to gain love.”

The formally titled Guillermo del Toro’s Pinocchio aims to stand apart. For one thing, the production quality of his film is self-evident in the ornate detail of the sets and textures of the characters. And he has reinterpreted Collodi’s tale in a way that distances it from the formidable Disney adaptations. “I have been very vocal about my admiration and my great, great love for Disney all my life, but that is an impulse that actually makes me move away from that version,” del Toro says. “I think it is a pinnacle of Disney animation. It’s done in the most beautiful, hand-drawn 2D animation.”

By contrast, he notes that his own film is “a story about a puppet, with puppets—trying to seek acting from the animators in a different medium completely. We couldn’t be more different than any other version of Pinocchio in our spiritual or philosophical goals, or even the setting.”

Del Toro’s Pinocchio takes place not in a fairy-tale world, but in Italy between World War I and World War II, during the rise of fascism and authoritarian rule in the country. The wooden boy happens to come to life “in an environment in which citizens behave with obedient, almost puppet-like faithfulness,” del Toro says.

Pinocchio (voiced by newcomer Gregory Mann) is a silly, sunny personality, eager to learn about the world and meet the people who inhabit it. But his roots, quite literally, are in sadness. In del Toro’s retelling, he is carved from a tree that grew over the grave of Geppetto’s son, Carlo, whose life was cut agonizingly short years before. (In the shot at the top in which del Toro is peeking through the window, you can see the lost child’s photo in a frame on the woodcarver’s workbench.)

The heartbroken Geppetto (voiced by David Bradley of Game of Thrones and the Harry Potter movies) is still too blinded by grief to realize that his wish has come true. “He begs for another chance at being a father, but he doesn’t recognize that the essence of his own child comes back in the form of this indomitable boy,” the filmmaker says. “The main conflict within Geppetto and Pinocchio is that Geppetto wanted Carlo, who was a very well-behaved, very docile kid, and he doesn’t quite get Pinocchio, who is rowdy and wild and exuberant.”

A creature who does understand Pinocchio’s heart is Sebastian J. Cricket (voiced by Ewan McGregor), the eloquent purple insect who built a home in his trunk and continues to reside there when he comes to life. In the image below, you see not just the erudite insect, but also the tree still standing over the lost child’s resting place. “That’s the arrival of the cricket, who has been crisscrossing the world, and this is where he discovers the perfect home,” del Toro says.

Once the tree becomes a living puppet, Sebastian aspires to be a conscience for the boy (just like his alter ego in the Disney version, Jiminy Cricket) But in del Toro’s adaptation he more or less…bugs the kid. “In the beginning of the story, the cricket is full of self-importance,” the director says. “And towards the end, he’s movingly humbled and he understands that it’s not about teaching Pinocchio how to behave, but about himself learning how to behave.”

Sebastian will need more than one lesson about getting out of the way—and he gets more than one lesson. Fortunately for him he is a survivor. “One of the things I liked in the book when I read it as a kid is that the cricket keeps getting killed over and over again and crushed and maimed,” del Toro says. “In our story, the cricket gets smushed often, but it’s a journey also for the cricket to find love and humility.”

The cricket is one of the only other mystical beings in the story. “I didn’t want magical creatures other than the wood spirit that gives him life, and Pinocchio himself,” del Toro says. “I didn’t want a talking fox and a talking cat and the magic of transforming him into a donkey. I wanted everything else to feel as close as we can to the real world.”

With that in mind, one of the story’s main villains, Count Volpe (voiced by Christoph Waltz), is not an actual anthropomorphic fox, but a human whose wing-like sideburns flare up like a fox’s ears. Del Toro describes him as “a grand aristocrat that has fallen into misfortune.”

“The three main villains in the original story are the cat, the fox, and the puppeteer, and we wanted to fuse them into one,” the director says. “This is a puppeteer that has regaled the courts of Europe, and now is traveling in a down and dirty little carnival. In Pinocchio, he finds the hope to be a king, again, you know? To recreate his grand, golden years.”

He fashions an ironclad and lengthy contract, then recruits Pinocchio to join his act, performing alongside other marionettes who are controlled by Volpe’s lead puppeteer—a monkey named Spazaturra, voiced by Cate Blanchett, worships Volpe, even though he is awful to her.

Source: Vanity Fair

 

 

 

Empire – December 2021 Issue Scan; & new Apple+ TV series directed by Alfonso Cuaron
Posted on
Oct 27, 2021

Empire – December 2021 Issue Scan; & new Apple+ TV series directed by Alfonso Cuaron

Hello, blanchetters!

New stills from Nightmare Alley has been released and scan from Empire UK – December 2021 Issue is now available where Nightmare Alley and Don’t Look Up are featured. At the recent Rome Film Festival, director Alfonso Cuaron said that Apple will be releasing more information about their new series where it is mentioned Cate will be starring in with Gary Oldman.

Empire – December 2021 Issue

We have also upgraded these two images to higher resolution:

Nightmare Alley: Guillermo Del Toro On Creating An ‘American Nightmare’ Noir

Click image for larger size:

From the caverns inhabited by the Pale Man in Pan’s Labyrinth, to the ghostly apparitions of Allerdale Hall in Crimson Peak, to the jaw-flapping Reapers in Blade II, chances are something that Guillermo del Toro has created has conjured up nightmares for you at some point in time. But with his next movie, the appropriately-titled Nightmare Alley, he’s creating a different kind of nightmare – a noir movie without any literal monsters, but filled with characters who might be considered monstrous. Take, for instance, Bradley Cooper’s central Stanton Carlisle and Cate Blanchett’s Lilith Ritter – a carnival worker and psychologist, respectively, who are caught up in a twisted plot.

Speaking to Empire in the upcoming Spider-Man: No Way Home issue, del Toro spoke about how his adaptation of William Lindsay Gresham’s 1946 novel strays differs from the former film version that came hot on the book’s heels in 1947 – and how he’s imbuing it with his own nightmarish sensibilities. “We’re wilfully allowing that movie to exist in its own space,” the director explains. “One of the things we decided is to not watch that movie again. We both liked what existed in it, we think it has terrific things in it, but what I wanted to do was, no pun intended, closer to a nightmare. It belongs to a genre only in that it deals with the underbelly or the flip side of the American Dream, which is always a nightmare.”

Don’t Look Up

As McKay tells Empire in the Spider-Man: No Way Home issue, Streep’s character is “an amalgam of all the ridiculous, ineffective Presidents that the United States has had over the past 40, 50 years.” And she’s far from the only big name in an astonishingly star-studded cast – one that features leads in Leonardo DiCaprio and Jennifer Lawrence (an astronomer duo warning of an approaching comet), plus Jonah Hill, Mark Rylance, Tyler Perry, Timothée Chalamet, Cate Blanchett, Himesh Patel, and appearances from Ariana Grande and Scott ‘Kid Cudi’ Mescudi.

It’s a stacked line-up that even McKay can’t believe. “Of course, it’s great to get tremendous actors in your movie, but I never expected it to be this many, and to this degree,” he says. “Initially I had a couple of people in mine – ‘Well, if we could get them, that would be great’ – and it just kind of kept snowballing.”

Source: Empire, Empire – DLU

Cate Blanchett to star in the upcoming Apple TV Mini-Series directed by Alfonso Cuarón

Oscar winner Alfonso Cuarón was a guest at the 16th Rome Film Fest: in the capital to talk about his relationship with Italian cinema, the director made a preview of Guillermo Del Toro’s Nightmare Alley , but also talked about the cinema of Federico Fellini, Paolo and Vittorio Taviani, Marco Ferreri, up to the contemporaries Emanuele Crialese, Valeria Golino and Alice Rorwacher.

On the red carpet of the Rome Film Fest 2021 he told us that soon Apple will announce something more detailed about the TV series, starring Cate Blanchett and Gary Oldman, which is making for the streaming platform AppleTV +.

We also asked him if he has seen his friend and colleague Guillermo Del Toro’s film Nightmare Alley before and the answer is yes: “It’s a masterpiece! Nightmare Alley is a wonderful masterpiece. I think it’s Guillermo Del Toro at his best: he really is. marvelous.”

Source: MoviePlayer

First Look at Cate Blanchett in Don’t Look Up; and TÁR updates
Posted on
Sep 8, 2021

First Look at Cate Blanchett in Don’t Look Up; and TÁR updates

Hello, everyone!

We finally have our first look at Cate Blanchett as Brie Evantee in Don’t Look Up. Netflix has released the first stills and teaser which features Cate. Don’t Look Up’s runtime is 2 hours and 25 minutes.

We also have some news on Todd Field’s TAR which is currently in production in Berlin. Check them below.

First Look at Don’t Look Up

Click the image for higher resolution:

 

Cate Blanchett to play a chief conductor of an orchestra in TÁR

Production is now getting underway in and around Berlin for Todd Field’s first film in fifteen years, TAR. Led by Cate Blanchett, the first announcement for the long-awaited new feature by the director of In the Bedroom and Little Children was slim on details, but now after a logline was revealed, more of the cast has been announced.

A pair of international cinema’s greatest talents, Nina Hoss (Barbara, Phoenix, My Little Sister) and Noémie Merlant (Portrait of a Lady on Fire, Paris 13th, District), have joined Blanchett in the drama, according to the German outlet Diesachsen. Icelandic composer Hildur Guðnadóttir (Joker, Sicario: Day of the Soldado) will provide the score, with filming confirmed at performances of the Dresden Philharmonic this month.

The actress will play the role of the first woman (Lydia Tár) ever to be invited as chief conductor of a large German orchestra, announced the Dresden Philharmonic. The shooting will start on September 16 in the concert hall of the Kulturpalast. 93 musicians from the Dresden Philharmonic are involved in the film project.

This filming also includes two regular concerts by the Dresden Philharmonic on September 18 and 19, for which tickets are still available. Gustav Mahler’s Symphony No. 5 in C sharp minor will be performed under the direction of Stanislav Kochanovsky. Pictures are shot with the audience – according to the Philharmonie, however, “no close-ups”. Several tents and trucks will be set up around the Kulturpalast for the 120-strong film team.

Source: The Film Stage, MDR

Cate Blanchett news compilation
Posted on
Sep 5, 2021

Cate Blanchett news compilation

Happy Sunday, everyone!

Some Cate related news. A new boxset of the The Lord of the Rings trilogy and The Hobbit trilogy will be released in October 2021 for the 20th anniversary of The Lord of the Rings: Fellowship of the Ring. It’s a 31-disc boxset that will have both theatrical and extended version of the movies, it will  include the (virtual) cast reunion that was shown post screening at Alamo Drafthouse cinemas early this year.

Cate is also in a cover for a new book titled Portrait of an Artist: Conversations with Trailblazing Creative Women by Hugo Huerta Marin which will be released on October 5th 2021. We will also have first look on Don’t Look Up on September 25th 2021.

Portrait of an Artist

From legendary visual artists Yoko Ono and Tracey Emin, to groundbreaking musicians like Annie Lennox and Debbie Harry, to fashion giants such as Miuccia Prada and Diane von Fu?rstenberg, this collection of original interviews and Polaroid photographs of almost 30 trailblazing women spans creative industries, nationalities and generations to bring together a never-before- published collection of leading voices. Featuring an astounding range of names including FKA Twigs, Isabelle Huppert and Rei Kawakubo, this book creates both a portrait of each individual woman and – collectively – a powerful portrait of the impact of women on the creative industries. Each pioneering creative is interviewed and photographed by the Mexican artist Hugo Huerta Marin. The women speak openly with Huerta Marin about their challenges and joys; their vulnerabilities and their triumphs. Cate Blanchett reflects on the differences between acting on stage and in film; Marina Abramovic discusses her most radical piece of performance art; Annie Lennox reminisces about London in the 1970s; Carrie Mae Weems discusses the relationship between race and photography —these and other conversations are further brought to life by Huerta Marin’s candid, intimate Polaroid images. These photographs, which allow readers to lock eyes with their subjects, reflect the natural tone of each conversation, allowing the reader rare insight into the lives of these renowned artists. Inspiring and revealing, this collection of interviews and photographs gives readers an unparalleled connection with some of the most fascinating women working in the arts today.

Click image for higher resolution:

First look on Don’t Look Up on September 25th

Netflix will be holding a free virtual event on September 25th 2021 to give us first look, updates, and new trailers for their upcoming series and movies which would include Don’t Look Up where Cate plays Brie Evantee. You can go to Tudum to watch the virtual event.

The three-hour Netflix TUDUM virtual event begins Saturday, September 25 at 9am PST / 12pm EST / 4pm GMT / 1am JST and KST.

There will be special pre-shows spotlighting Korean and Indian series and films along with fantastic Anime content that will kick-off at 5am PST / 8am EST / 12pm GMT / 9pm JST and KST on specific channels. (See below for more channel information.)

Source: Penguin Random House, The Digital Bits

Cate Blanchett series ‘Stateless’ Premieres July 8 on Netflix
Posted on
May 28, 2020

Cate Blanchett series ‘Stateless’ Premieres July 8 on Netflix

Hi everyone!

Six-Episode Limited Series “Stateless” is coming to Netflix July 08.
Time to see Pat Masters (Cate Blanchett) again!

Netflix acquired Stateless in February ahead of its original premiere in Australia in March.

The streaming service released the first look photos yesterday.

‘Stateless’
Netflix
Picture, if you will, coming into contact with a predatory cult — and being recruited by cult leaders who look just like Cate Blanchett and Dominic West! That’s only one subplot of this Australian mini-series — whose creators include Blanchett and the producer Tony Ayres (“The Slap”) — about desperate lives intersecting at a bleak detention camp for immigrants. The cast is an Australian all-star team that includes Marta Dusseldorp (“A Place to Call Home”), Asher Keddie (“Offspring”) and, in the central role of the cult victim, Yvonne Strahovski (“The Handmaid’s Tale”). (July 8)

Sources:NYTimes

Mowgli: Legend of the Jungle to open in selected cinemas ahead Netflix release
Posted on
Nov 8, 2018

Mowgli: Legend of the Jungle to open in selected cinemas ahead Netflix release

This is a great news! Mowgli, now called Mowgli: Legend of the Jungle, is going to be release in few selected cinemas (Los Angeles, New York, San Francisco, and London) on November 29, 2018, followed by the global relased on Netflix set for December 7,2018.
A new trailer and a new poster have been released today: you can hear Cate’s voice as Kaa (the serpent) at 2:05. Enjoy!

Official InstagramOfficial Facebook

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Netflix Acquires ‘Mowgli’ , Andy Serkis-Directed movie featuring Cate Blanchett
Posted on
Aug 1, 2018

Netflix Acquires ‘Mowgli’ , Andy Serkis-Directed movie featuring Cate Blanchett

Hello everyone!

Some important news about the movie Mowgli in which Cate Blanchett plays the snake Kaa. Take a look:

Netflix Acquires Andy Serkis-Directed ‘Mowgli’ From Warner Bros & Plans 2019 Global Streaming Release

Welcome to the jungle that is this fast-shifting movie meld between theatrical release and streaming. In the biggest acquisition of a finished film it has made so far, Netflix has acquired from Warner Bros the worldwide rights to Mowgli, the CGI live action film directed by Andy Serkis based on the Jungle Book stories of Rudyard Kipling. Instead of an October 19 theatrical release by Warner Bros, the film will be released globally on Netflix next year, with a theatrical component built in so that audiences can see the 3D version that Serkis has been working so hard on.

The film has a cast that includes Christian Bale as the cunning panther Bagheera, Cate Blanchett as the sinister snake Kaa, Benedict Cumberbatch as the deadly tiger Shere Khan, Moonlight‘s Naomie Harris as the female wolf Nisha, and Serkis as the wise bear Baloo. Surrounding them in live action roles are The Americans‘ Matthew Rhys, Freida Pinto and Rohan Chand, who after appearing in the films The Hundred-Foot Journey and Bad Words, plays Mowgli, the boy raised by wolves.

In buying worldwide rights from Warner Bros, Netflix gets a first-rate studio-caliber film made by Serkis, who has turned in groundbreaking performance capture and CGI work in films like The Lord of The Rings as Gollum, King Kong, and The Planet Of The Apes films. Serkis and Warner Bros get out from under the inevitable stigma that would have haunted a full scale theatrical release of a film that would inevitably be compared to Disney’s The Jungle Book, which grossed $966 million worldwide. At one point, there was a race between that film and Mowgli — both based on Kipling’s public domain work — but it is never good to be runner up, especially when the other one became such a big hit.

Serkis made Mowgli with 3D effects he hopes can be displayed in a theatrical component that will be part of Netflix’s release plans. But here, he will get an enormous global audience and see through his vision for a story that is darker and more dangerous than the one Jon Favreau directed for Disney.
[…]

Once the ticking clock stopped and they stopped worrying about beating their rival, Serkis and his film making team took their time to focus on the strengths of their film. They sought guidance from outsiders, like when Oscar winning Gravity director Alfonso Cuaron spent a couple weeks dispensing wisdom, while Serkis was off shooting War for the Planet of the Apes. “We took our time with the performance capture, allowing the animators to make the most of the great performances by Blanchett, Cumberbatch and Christian Bale, to bring them to life in the most extraordinary way we could,” Serkis said.

The movie was shot in South Africa and made to reflect the jungles of India and its civilization during the 19th Century.

“I wanted to make it of its time and reflect Kipling’s own journey,” Serkis told Deadline. “His first language was [Hindi], and he was brought up in India, and then came to live in England. There, he suffered brutality and bullying because he was an outsider, and I think that sense of otherness came through in his Jungle Book stories and the character of Mowgli. Kipling’s work has been interpreted in a lot of different ways, and his writing since his glory days back then has been somewhat vilified for his depiction of globalism. There is a racist element to many of his stories and poems. You cannot ignore, though, that he wrote and reflected the political situation at the time, and in a mild way, the film examines emotions of class and colonialization of India.” Class comparison metaphors are there in contrasting the relationship between the British, the villagers, and the animals of the jungle.

“All these themes are attached to a live action movie that has the real feel of being shot on location of real jungle sets in South Africa,” Serkis said.
[…]

“I’m really excited about Netflix for Mowgli,” Serkis said. “Now, we avoid comparisons to the other movie and it’s a relief not to have the pressure. I’ve seen the 3D version, and it’s exceptional, a different view from the 2D version, really lush and with great depth, and there will be some kind of theatrical component for that. What excites me most is the forward thinking at Netflix in how to present this, and the message of the movie. They understand this is a darker telling that doesn’t fit it into a four quadrant slot. It’s really not meant for young kids, though I think it’s possible that 10 or above can watch it. It was always meant to be PG-13, and this allows us to go deeper, with darker themes, to be scary and frightening in moments. The violence between animals is not gratuitous, but it’s definitely there. This way of going allows us to get the film out without compromise.

[…]

This takes to a new level the deals that Netflix has been making with movie companies looking to lay off risk on their projects. That included buying rights to Paramount’s Cloverfield sequel God Particle, advertising it as a surprise on the Super Bowl and launching it right after the game, to acquiring the foreign rights to New Line’s new Shaft movie from Warner Bros and New Line, which will play on Netflix’s offshore service two weeks after the domestic theatrical release, and offshore rights on the Alex Garland-directed Natalie Portman-starrer Annihilation from Paramount, which began running 17 days after its domestic theatrical launch. It is eyed as a new model for films that have a hard time gaining traction overseas, but the Mowgli deal is much different in scope and scale.

Callie Kloves wrote the script. Pic is an Imaginarium Productions film that is produced by Steve Kloves, Jonathan Cavendish and David Barron, with Nikki Penny exec producing. Peter Mullan, Jack Reynor, Eddie Marsan and Tom Hollander rounds out the voice and live action cast.

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