Cate Blanchett on W Magazine cover; and Nominations for Nightmare Alley and Don’t Look Up Performance
Posted on
Jan 13, 2022

Cate Blanchett on W Magazine cover; and Nominations for Nightmare Alley and Don’t Look Up Performance

Great day, Blanchetters!

Cate is on one of the covers of W Magazine’s Best Performances this year. She has also received her 16th and 17th nomination from SAG (Screen Actors Guild) Awards for both Nightmare Alley and Don’t Look Up. BAFTA released their longlist which includes Cate’s performance in Don’t Look Up in the supporting role category. We also added a behind the scene photo, still, and some scans from Nightmare Alley on our gallery. Check them below!

Critics Choice FYC

Behind the scene and still from Nightmare Alley

The Hollywood Reporter – January 12th 2022 (Beware of spoilers!)

Cate Blanchett Keeps on the Sunny Side

The plot of Guillermo del Toro’s Nightmare Alley could be boiled down to a game of cat and mouse. Cate Blanchett’s Lilith is hell-bent on exposing Bradley Cooper’s Stan as a quack, and she sure doesn’t mind taking the purported mentalist’s girlfriend, played by Rooney Mara, down with him. (Suffice to say, this is not the Carol reunion we envisioned.) For W’s annual Best Performances issue, Blanchett shares how starring in the film brightened her pandemic experience—along with a bit of gardening on the side.

Production on Nightmare Alley was stopped for six months during lockdown.

Yes—and that was fine. I love the project. I saw Tod Browning’s Freaks at an impressionable age, and it was so full of humanity. I’ve always been fascinated by the circus or carnival world. I saw the original [1947] Nightmare Alley with Tyrone Power, and I loved that in the film, everything was a game. [In this version], I play the traditional femme fatale—I draw men to their doom. But I saw my character, Lilith, as a beacon of truth in a perverted way. Someone who was able to excavate the truth from a person who did not want the truth revealed.

The film is set in the world of fortune-telling and “carny” workers. Have you ever had your fortune told?

Years ago, I played a psychic in a Sam Raimi film called The Gift. I’d never even had a reading, so I thought I should. She said some very strange things that didn’t make sense at the time, including that I would have four children. Much of what she said came to pass—and here I am with four children! Part of me wanted to rush back and see her again, and part of me never wanted to see her again. [Laughs]

What were your Covid activities during the film’s six-month break?

I gardened for England! Couldn’t stop planting! We had a derelict greenhouse on our property that we brought back to life. I practiced the piano. And I also watched every episode of The Sopranos, which I had never seen. I can’t look at a screen now—I have PTSD about watching anything at home. I want to be out: in a cinema, a concert hall, a theater, experiencing something with strangers. I miss that communal bond.

Do you think Nightmare Alley has a larger message?

Yes. The more one tries to conceal one’s true nature, the more those tendencies will have an impact on your life. It’s one thing to lie—it’s another thing to believe your lies. (And my character reveals the truth.)

2022 EE British Academy Film Awards Longlist

Supporting Actress

15 performances will progress to Round Two of voting, and six will be nominated. To determine this longlist, in Round One the acting chapter voted; the top 12 were automatically longlisted. The remaining three places have been voted on by the Longlisting jury, who have considered the next 10 placed performances from the chapter vote. Round Two is voted on by a jury who will vote for the six nominations. In Round Three, the general voting membership will select the winner in this category. 202 performances were submitted for consideration.

Caitríona Balfe Belfast
Cate Blanchett Don’t Look Up
Jessie Buckley The Lost Daughter
Ana de Armas No Time To Die
Ariana DeBose West Side Story
Ann Dowd Mass
Judi Dench Belfast
Kirsten Dunst The Power of the Dog
Aunjanue Ellis King Richard
Kathryn Hunter The Tragedy of Macbeth
Rita Moreno West Side Story
Ruth Negga Passing
Vinette Robinson Boiling Point
Meryl Streep Don’t Look Up
Anya Taylor-Joy Last Night in Soho

SAG Nomination

Cate has been nominated for Outstanding Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role (Nightmare Alley) and Outstanding Performance by a Cast in Motion Picture (Don’t Look Up). She is now the most nominated actor in the ensemble category with 7 nominations and 1 win — Lord of the Rings Trilogy (won for Return of the King), The Aviator, Babel, The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, and the latest is Don’t Look Up.

After going virtual last year amid the pandemic, the SAG Awards are returning to an in-person event, though this year’s ceremony will be held in the spacious Santa Monica Barker Hangar and follow COVID safety protocols. The show will simulcast live on Feb. 27 on TNT and TBS on at 8 p.m. ET / 5 p.m. PT.

Meryl Streep & Cate Blanchett Continue Record Streaks For SAG Award Film Nominations

Overall, including TV noms, Meryl Streep counts 19 SAG nominations in her career including noms from such TV series as Big Little Lies (ensemble drama) in 2020 and a 2004 win for female lead actor in a TV movie/miniseries for HBO’s Angels in America.

Cate Blanchett isn’t far behind, taking her SAG nom running total to second place among all feature performers from 14 to 16 today with a supporting female actor nomination for Searchlight’s Nightmare Alley and an ensemble feature cast nomination for Don’t Look Up. In total for her career, including SAG nom recognition from TV roles, Blanchett counts 17 SAG nominations, tying with Allison Janney’s overall count.

Blanchett won three times prior, for Film Best Female Lead Actor (2014 for Blue Jasmine), Supporting Female Actor (2005 for The Aviator) and Ensemble Feature cast (2004 for Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King).

Source: W Magazine, BAFTA, Variety, Deadline

Cate Blanchett in Pedro Almodóvar’s First English-Language Feature; & Nightmare Alley and Don’t Look Up Updates
Posted on
Jan 8, 2022

Cate Blanchett in Pedro Almodóvar’s First English-Language Feature; & Nightmare Alley and Don’t Look Up Updates

Happy weekend, Blanchetters!

Cate will produce and star in Pedro Almodóvar’s First English-Language Feature — A Manual for Cleaning Women. She also appeared on #FallonTonight last Wednesday to promote Nightmare Alley. We updated the FYC Campaign folder and uploaded the scans from latest issue of Total Film with a short interview with Cate. You can also check a behind the scene footage from the movie. The conversation with cast of Don’t Look Up is also out. Check them below. Beware of spoilers!

We would like to thank Susann for her donation to the site!

Cate Blanchett to Star in Pedro Almodóvar’s First English-Language Feature ‘A Manual for Cleaning Women’

Cate Blanchett has officially signed on to star in Pedro Almodóvar’s first English-language feature film, “A Manual for Cleaning Women.”

The film is an adaptation of Lucia Berlin’s short story collection of the same name, which includes 43 stories about women in multiple types of demanding jobs.

It was confirmed to Variety exclusively that the project is in the early stages of development, with Blanchett’s production company Dirty Films producing the feature for New Republic Pictures, in association with El Deseo. Andrew Upton and Coco Francini are producing alongside Blanchett for Dirty Films. Brian Oliver and Bradley Fischer are producing for New Republic Pictures alongside Almodóvar.

Almodóvar spoke with Variety for our “Up Next” series in December about the project, saying he was writing the script in Spanish before translating it to English.

FYC

Total Film – January 2022

The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon

Screencaptures

Screencaptures

Special behind-the-scenes look at powerful casting in Guillermo del Toro’s ‘Nightmare Alley’

Adam McKay + Cast In Conversation for Don’t Look Up

Source: Variety, ABC7

Cate Blanchett AACTA International Nomination; 032c Magazine Photos; & New Interview and Nightmare Alley Featurette
Posted on
Dec 19, 2021

Cate Blanchett AACTA International Nomination; 032c Magazine Photos; & New Interview and Nightmare Alley Featurette

Hi, Blanchett fans!

Cate has been nominated at the AACTA International for her performance in Don’t Look Up. A new Nightmare Alley featurette has been released. Check out some of the photos from 032C photoshoot below.

AACTA International Nomination

The 2021 AACTA International Awards will be presented virtually at 7 a.m. AEDT on Thursday, Jan. 27 (12 p.m. PT on Wednesday January 26).

Nightmare Alley Featurette

Screencaptures

A double dose of the great Cate for the holidays

This morning I had the opportunity to interview Cate Blanchett, whose latest film Nightmare Alley opens today. I got to see that in a packed preview screening earlier this month at the spectacular Academy Museum theater and it looked stunning (not sure howI would have reviewed its considerable visual glories off a link). I brought up the fact that it is so great to see this Guillermo del Toro film opening exclusively in theaters, and it is great to see people going back, however cautiously.

“It is crazy times but I doubt there is going to be a non-crazy time in the near future,” she said. “I really think people, well I can speak for myself, but I think the one thing I missed, even though we are not out of the woods yet, the one thing I missed in the epicenter of the pandemic was gathering in the dark with strangers, because it does add to the experience when other people you don’t know are all joined in that experience.”

Blanchett had high praise for her director, working with del Toro for the first time, saying, “Guillermo is a singular filmmaking creature. There is no one like him making movies.” This two-time Oscar winner has obviously worked with a lot of great directors, so that is saying something.

Nightmare Alley is a delicious period film noir in which the psychiatrist she portrays goes toe to toe on the dark side with a devious Bradley Cooper in this remake of the 1947 Tyrone Power classic and reimagining of the controversial book that came out in 1946. It is a film that has strong entertainment value but also a timely message. In some ways you could say, even though this film is set in 1939 and early ’40s, it talks about things Blanchett thinks are a global problem today, including the Big Lie.

“It is a big problem today, this relationship with the truth, and something that obviously the film deals with absolutely is the most dangerous part is when the liar starts to believe the lie,” she said. “It is sort of relevant to the old Soviet era, the systems we labored under, where we know they are lying, they know that we know and don’t give a damn, and we don’t give a damn either…I think it is very nightmarish.”

Usually film noir is in black and white, but this was shot in color. However, as we were chatting this morning I told Blanchett, who was Zooming in from England, that it was just announced there will be a special black-and-white version of the movie released to select theaters in January. I for one can’t wait. “Guillermo talked about it when we were shooting saying ‘Oh maybe this should be in black and white but they’ll kill me,’ but it is so great they finally are getting to do that,” she said. “I don’t enjoy watching myself on screen, but I loved watching this movie so I will queue up and buy a ticket.”

Blanchett not only has Nightmare Alley this holiday season, but also the hilarious, timely and pertinent Don’t Look Up, the all-star Adam McKay comedy in theaters and hitting Netflix next week. The pic uses the premise of an impending comet about to destroy Earth as a wry comment on the lack of urgency by many for the distinct dangers of climate change.

I wondered if she was now picking movies like these two that not only have great entertainment value, but also have something important to say; both films were nominated this week for Best Picture by the Critics Choice Association. “It is very rare that two movies come along like this in relatively quick succession and you get to be a part of it,” she said. “Both of them have such exceptional casts, with two incredibly distinctive directorial voices, and you’ve got all of these people working at the top of their game in films that deal with very contemporary relevant issues but doing it in a way through allegory and metaphor and satire, so that there’s no agitprop preaching quality to either film at all. They are there to hold the audience’s hand and entertain them and hopefully leave them feeling more deeply, connecting maybe. It is very rare. I feel pretty blessed to have been a small part of both.”

032c Magazine

Source: Variety, Deadline

Cate Blanchett covers 032C Issue #40; & Don’t Look Up and Nightmare Alley updates
Posted on
Dec 9, 2021

Cate Blanchett covers 032C Issue #40; & Don’t Look Up and Nightmare Alley updates

Hi, Blanchett fans!

Cate appears in one of the covers of 032c Issue #40 with Riccardo Tisci, who is the current chief creative officer of Burberry. A new character poster of Cate as Brie Evantee in Don’t Look Up has also been released plus a new clip from Nightmare Alley. Both movies are on National Board of Review (NBR) and American Film Institute (AFI) top 10 movies of 2021. There’s also a short interview with Cate published by The Guardian.

032c Issue # 40 – Winter 2021/2022

The 032c Issue #40 cover dossier, “The Road to Burberry,” explores how 47-year-old Italian creative director Riccardo Tisci came to the 165-year-old British heritage label Burberry. Joining along the way are actress and two-time 032c cover star CATE BLANCHETT, photographers Mert & Marcus, artist Thomas Jeppe, and poet Caconrad, for an 80-page journey charting the course of 21st century fashion. Elsewhere, two generations of UK Rap Royalty collide as Skepta and Little Simz don Bottega Veneta in London for a shoot by Gabriel Moses. Ilya Lipkin shadows the Supreme team as they skate Berlin. Political scientist Mark Leonard explains The Age of Unpeace – and how the global systems that once connected us have come to tear us apart. Bodies revolt in the works of German artist Alexandra Bircken, outerwear reaches peak genius in the hands of Moncler CEO Remo Ruffini, and the films of Michael Mann flood our world with blue in a treatise by Mahfuz Sultan. Jordan Barrett is airbrushed to bootlegged perfection for a countryside shoot with Bruno Staub and Vittoria Ceretti sparkles in the night for Vito Fernicola in two features styled by Marc Goehring. Power duo Ana and Danko Steiner couple architecture and desire. Ana Ofak revives the legacy of Svetlana Kana Radevic, the unsung heroine of Balkan brutalism. Voices from the 032c.com cosmos reflect on the monstrous, alien, infectious, clairvoyant, shape-shifting, devious, and transcendent present in our new X-FILES section.

The magazine is now available for order on 032c website.

Click image for bigger size:

Don’t Look Up and Nightmare Alley on NBR and AFI Top 10 films of 2021

NBR – The honorees will be feted at the NBR Awards Gala, hosted by Willie Geist, on Tuesday, January 11, 2022.

Top Films (in alphabetical order)

Belfast
Don’t Look Up
Dune
King Richard
The Last Duel
Nightmare Alley
Red Rocket
The Tragedy of Macbeth
West Side Story

AFI AWARDS – The honorees include 10 outstanding films and 10 outstanding TV programs deemed culturally and artistically representative of this year’s most significant achievements in the art of the moving image. The honorees will be celebrated on January 7, 2022, at a private reception, and beginning on January 8, 2022.

Here’s a short clip from Nightmare Alley:

Don’t Look Up Character Poster – Brie Evantee

Cate Blanchett on her end-of-the-world plans

If a massive meteor were expected to collide with Earth in six months’ time, what would our leaders do? Everything in their power to stop it? Or everything possible to leverage it for political and financial gain?

How about the rest of us? How would we cope with the prospect of impending apocalypse? By facing the end of the world with sobriety and compassion? Or drowning ourselves in sex, drugs and celebrity gossip? Might some of us even enjoy the drama?

Adam McKay’s new film, Don’t Look Up, is a starry satire addressing these questions with a broad brush – and fresh urgency. It is that rare thing: a mainstream movie that seeks genuinely to engage with the issues dominating the news and plaguing our dreams.

Jennifer Lawrence and Leonardo DiCaprio play the misfit scientists who spot the comet; Meryl Streep is the Trumpian president who seeks to sweep this species-ending event under the carpet until it is expedient.

Cate Blanchett and Tyler Perry are the remorselessly lightweight hosts of a US daytime talkshow on which the news is broken, Mark Rylance the creepy tech billionaire with ambitions to be the messiah who saves humanity.

Here, Blanchett answers questions about how she would face the end of the world as we know it.

If extinction were imminent, which daily chore would you stop immediately?

Stockpiling toilet paper. I do find routine strangely comforting, though. So I might, sadly, go into routine overdrive. Baking like there’s no tomorrow – when there actually wouldn’t be one.

Where would you want to see in the apocalypse – and with whom?

I guess dancing up a storm in the living room with my husband and children, and the farmer from across the way. Man, that farmer can dance.

What do you find terrifying?

Leaf blowers. They encapsulate all that is wrong with us as a species.

Do you think Covid has brought into focus how rich many people’s lives used to be?

I’m not really a believer in “the good old days”. Richer before? I’m not so sure. Things weren’t working for millions of people before the pandemic. Systems were already broken, or breaking open. You could say the pandemic just made these fissures and inequities undeniable. It certainly brought into focus how possible it would be to implement a basic living wage.

Do you subscribe to any conspiracy theories?

Conspiracy theories freak me out; I mean, the fact that they are believed at all keeps me awake at night. I relish them in movies and novels – where they belong.

What is the most propulsive thing that has ever happened to you?

Giving birth. That and spending 36 hours in the eye of a hurricane off the coast of Greenland.

Source: The Guardian, NBR, AFI

Cate Blanchett in Porter Magazine; & New Nightmare Alley Clips, and Don’t Look Up Still
Posted on
Nov 29, 2021

Cate Blanchett in Porter Magazine; & New Nightmare Alley Clips, and Don’t Look Up Still

Hello, everyone! Feeling ecstatic with this new Cate update!

Cate covers Porter Magazine. We have updated the gallery with the editorials and the outtakes. There are new footage from Nightmare Alley clips, and Vogue published an article on the costumes in the movie. Also, new still from Don’t Look Up has been released.

Leading Light with Cate Blanchett

Few actors have the cachet of CATE BLANCHETT, but what really drives the multi-Oscar-winning star these days? She talks to AJESH PATALAY about choosing projects that provoke, overcoming parenting challenges and why she’s not interested in ‘winning’ the scene

Click image for higher resolution

When Cate Blanchett finds her groove, it’s like a wind catching in her sails – and a wonderful thing to behold. She’s currently in Berlin, where she’s shooting Tàr, a movie written and directed by Todd Field, in which she plays an eminent music conductor. Having just come off a night shoot when we speak, the actor takes a few minutes to revive. Talking about Berlin, a city she adores, instantly warms her up. “There are so many expat Australians living here,” she effuses. “I feel very at home.”

Next, Blanchett moves into enthusiastic discussion about Tàr, in which she gets to conduct (or pretend to) a full orchestra: “It’s been astonishing. Just to be vibrating in that space with that many musicians.” This leads her on to a rhapsody about a National Trust performance that was broadcast live during the first UK lockdown in 2020, for which five musicians in different locations began playing as daylight broke where they were, building from a solo to a quintet. “My husband and I lay there – we’re sort of on a hill…” Blanchett says of the manor estate in East Sussex (which includes an orchard where, naturally, she presses apples in her downtime), where she lives with her playwright/director husband Andrew Upton and their four children. “We just watched the dawn, in russet mantle clad, emerging,” she says, quoting Shakespeare, “knowing there were about 5,000 other people listening to this music. It was the most beautiful gift that came out of the pandemic.”

Five minutes later, we’re on to climate change and Blanchett is firing on all cylinders. The subject is her next release, Don’t Look Up, a boisterous satire from writer/director Adam McKay about two astronomers (played by Leonardo DiCaprio, himself a fierce advocate for climate action, and Jennifer Lawrence) who try to warn mankind about an approaching comet that will destroy Earth. Everyone, from clickbait pundits and tech billionaires to inept presidents, is subject to ridicule in a story that becomes an obvious metaphor for global warming. Blanchett plays a TV talk-show host, a model of artificiality with bleached-blonde hair, blinding white teeth and impossibly bronzed skin. “Actually, it’s a revolting moment when you wash that makeup off and see the sludge going [down the drain],” she recalls. “It’s quite confronting.”

On the environmental matters that inform the film, she doesn’t sugar any pills. “Everyone is trying to be positive, talking about 1.5 degrees of global warming,” she says. “But 1.5 would still be disastrous. We need to be fucking scared… and demand change; be collectively courageous enough to face that fear and do something about it.” The movie, for all its doomsday messaging, is actually a laugh a minute. And there’s a particular thrill in seeing so many Hollywood stars onscreen at the same time. One pivotal scene in the White House Situation Room brings together five Oscar winners and one Oscar nominee: Blanchett, DiCaprio, Lawrence, Meryl Streep (who plays a catastrophically useless president), Mark Rylance and Jonah Hill.

What was it like being in that room? “It did feel like a Last Supper,” Blanchett says, but this was less a measure of the star wattage than of the strict Covid protocols that were in place, along with the film’s apocalyptic plot. Still, she concedes, getting to high-five Streep (which is the extent of their interaction onscreen) “was great”.

At the same time, Blanchett stars opposite Bradley Cooper in Guillermo del Toro’s Nightmare Alley, a period noir set in the world of a traveling carnival that follows the “rise and fall of a liar”, according to del Toro. Many will see the film (like Don’t Look Up) as a response to the Trump era. “I definitely think this was something boiling in Guillermo,” says Blanchett. “[The film] is a real dark night of the soul. You watch a man breaking the rules, getting away with it… and refusing to show sympathy or compassion.”

McKay has said Don’t Look Up was inspired by a litany of “disastrous presidents”. And Blanchett points to other populist leaders, remarking on the common thread. “I’m hoping it’s a white-male ghost dance,” she says. “They realize they’re on the edge of extinction and they’re panicking. We’re witnessing them in their death throes, which is why it’s so aggressive and destructive.” I ask if, on the contrary, such leaders could see a resurgence. “That’s why people have to vote,” she fires back. “And exercise their power. I’m sounding like I’m on a soapbox, which I’m not interested in, but it’s important to not give in. I’m not giving up hope. As I say to my kids [on climate change], if we’re going out, how do we choose to go out? It’s a terrible conversation to have with your 13-year-old, isn’t it? But anyway. We do laugh around the dinner table. That’s what’s good about Adam’s film. You have to laugh.”

Understandably, Blanchett prefers discussions about her work and not to be caught soapboxing. “I couldn’t be less interested in agitprop [or] telling people what to think,” she says. But she is drawn to films that “ask provocative questions” and she isn’t afraid to get behind causes she believes in, such as Prince William’s Earthshot Prize, which awards contributions to environmentalism. She also recognizes how fraught being outspoken in public can be. “You have to be judicious,” she says. “I’ve been asked to do things by people and I’ve said, ‘I think I’m going to be a liability’.” Her presence can derail a debate, she acknowledges, as she draws the focus over the issues.

She also sees how polarized – and mired by point-scoring – public discourse has become. “I’m very sad about the loss of genuine debate,” she says, “where leaders, public intellectuals and everyday citizens try to find common ground, try to understand the issue, rather than try to win… Even in acting, people talk about [how] to ‘win’ the scene. No, we have to make the scene come alive. And we might have to lose a bit here, win a bit there.”

iven how social media is sharpening the debate, I wonder how much that comes up in conversations with her teenage children Dashiell, Roman and Ignatius, and her youngest, Edith. “A lot,” she says. “Because so much of our so-called information comes through social media. I’m old enough to have been taught at school what a primary, secondary and tertiary source is. I say to the children when they mention something, ‘Where did you read it? Who has [authenticated] that? You have to learn how to read an image and article. And if you’re going to share something, you’d better make sure you have checked the sources.’ Of course, they roll their eyes. But when you hear them talk to their friends, I think they’re responsible. My son is studying physics and philosophy, so he is really interesting to talk to about [technology]. I don’t want to become a separated generation, because I also feel responsible for the landscape he is about to emerge into as an adult.”

On to lighter topics and there’s still one question of vital, global importance I have yet to ask: what did Blanchett make of Adele holding her up as ‘her style icon’ in a recent interview for Vogue? The actor laughs. “I was absolutely chuffed! I think she is amazing. So down to earth. Our paths crossed when she came to Australia on tour.”

As for her own style icons, Blanchett cites Iris Apfel and Fran Lebowitz. And her regard for fashion can be traced back to her early years playing dress-up with her sister: “My sister would dress me up and I would pretend to be whatever the costume told me to be,” she recalls.

She’s clearly not lost her appetite for childish play because, when asked to name the role she’s most enjoyed playing across her illustrious career, it isn’t the historical dramas, fantasy epics or action blockbusters that first spring to mind. It’s “voicing a monkey” in Guillermo del Toro’s upcoming version of Pinocchio. “That was hilarious,” she says. “I’d listen to a lot of different chimpanzees, then try everything out. You go back to being six years old. I mean, I have a six-year-old, so [I did] a bit of work with [her] too.” That must have been fun for her daughter. “Actually, she got rapidly sick of my noises,” Blanchett smiles. “Hopefully, the audience won’t.” As if we ever could.

‘Don’t Look Up’ is in cinemas from December 10 and on Netflix from December 24. ‘Nightmare Alley’ is in cinemas from December 17 (US) and January 21 (UK)

Porter Magazine

Creating the Costumes for the Charlatans, Hustlers, and Con Artists of Guillermo del Toro’s Nightmare Alley

Nightmare Alley is Del Toro’s homage to classic film noir, where a character’s alluring façade can mask ulterior motives. Take Dr. Lilith Ritter, a glamorous psychiatrist who attempts to expose Stanton as a fraud before getting tangled in his web of deception. She’s played by Cate Blanchett in full femme fatale mode, and her collection of stylish gowns and velvet capes reveals more about the character than any verbal description.

“Luis designed a reality with his costumes that reflect personality and help tell the story,” Del Toro says. “Leather, wool, embroidery—they all define character and integrate visually to a color and texture palette, seamlessly.”

Ahead of Nightmare Alley’s December 17 premiere in theaters, Sequeira shared some of his costume sketches with Vogue and spoke about bringing Del Toro’s sinister world to life.

Dr. Ritter represents the world of distinguished old money that Stanton wishes to inhabit. Sequeira cites her as his favorite character to dress in Nightmare Alley, drawing inspiration from Paris fashion sketches from the ’40s for Blanchett’s designs. “It was all about working with Cate’s body frame and making her look as beautiful as possible, which isn’t difficult,” he says. The designer culled materials from various archives across Spain, Italy, and the U.K., pulling different types of velvet for Dr. Ritter’s collection of glamorous eveningwear. “There’s one gown that had little brass stitching throughout, so in the low lighting of the Copa, any kind of movement really made the fabric sing.”

Click image for higher resolution and more concept art photos:

Check these two new clips with some unseen clips from the movie.

 

Vogue

Don’t Look Up

Don’t Look Up offers plenty of comedic knives for Trumpism (the title is the rallying cry of science deniers), but it’s also a brutal send-up of the media. Cate Blanchett’s take on a morning show anchor for a show called The Daily Rip is as close to Mika Brzezinski as one could get without being an impersonation. Even The New York Times comes in for a spanking.

Vanity Fair

Empire – December 2021 Issue Scan; & new Apple+ TV series directed by Alfonso Cuaron
Posted on
Oct 27, 2021

Empire – December 2021 Issue Scan; & new Apple+ TV series directed by Alfonso Cuaron

Hello, blanchetters!

New stills from Nightmare Alley has been released and scan from Empire UK – December 2021 Issue is now available where Nightmare Alley and Don’t Look Up are featured. At the recent Rome Film Festival, director Alfonso Cuaron said that Apple will be releasing more information about their new series where it is mentioned Cate will be starring in with Gary Oldman.

Empire – December 2021 Issue

We have also upgraded these two images to higher resolution:

Nightmare Alley: Guillermo Del Toro On Creating An ‘American Nightmare’ Noir

Click image for larger size:

From the caverns inhabited by the Pale Man in Pan’s Labyrinth, to the ghostly apparitions of Allerdale Hall in Crimson Peak, to the jaw-flapping Reapers in Blade II, chances are something that Guillermo del Toro has created has conjured up nightmares for you at some point in time. But with his next movie, the appropriately-titled Nightmare Alley, he’s creating a different kind of nightmare – a noir movie without any literal monsters, but filled with characters who might be considered monstrous. Take, for instance, Bradley Cooper’s central Stanton Carlisle and Cate Blanchett’s Lilith Ritter – a carnival worker and psychologist, respectively, who are caught up in a twisted plot.

Speaking to Empire in the upcoming Spider-Man: No Way Home issue, del Toro spoke about how his adaptation of William Lindsay Gresham’s 1946 novel strays differs from the former film version that came hot on the book’s heels in 1947 – and how he’s imbuing it with his own nightmarish sensibilities. “We’re wilfully allowing that movie to exist in its own space,” the director explains. “One of the things we decided is to not watch that movie again. We both liked what existed in it, we think it has terrific things in it, but what I wanted to do was, no pun intended, closer to a nightmare. It belongs to a genre only in that it deals with the underbelly or the flip side of the American Dream, which is always a nightmare.”

Don’t Look Up

As McKay tells Empire in the Spider-Man: No Way Home issue, Streep’s character is “an amalgam of all the ridiculous, ineffective Presidents that the United States has had over the past 40, 50 years.” And she’s far from the only big name in an astonishingly star-studded cast – one that features leads in Leonardo DiCaprio and Jennifer Lawrence (an astronomer duo warning of an approaching comet), plus Jonah Hill, Mark Rylance, Tyler Perry, Timothée Chalamet, Cate Blanchett, Himesh Patel, and appearances from Ariana Grande and Scott ‘Kid Cudi’ Mescudi.

It’s a stacked line-up that even McKay can’t believe. “Of course, it’s great to get tremendous actors in your movie, but I never expected it to be this many, and to this degree,” he says. “Initially I had a couple of people in mine – ‘Well, if we could get them, that would be great’ – and it just kind of kept snowballing.”

Source: Empire, Empire – DLU

Cate Blanchett to star in the upcoming Apple TV Mini-Series directed by Alfonso Cuarón

Oscar winner Alfonso Cuarón was a guest at the 16th Rome Film Fest: in the capital to talk about his relationship with Italian cinema, the director made a preview of Guillermo Del Toro’s Nightmare Alley , but also talked about the cinema of Federico Fellini, Paolo and Vittorio Taviani, Marco Ferreri, up to the contemporaries Emanuele Crialese, Valeria Golino and Alice Rorwacher.

On the red carpet of the Rome Film Fest 2021 he told us that soon Apple will announce something more detailed about the TV series, starring Cate Blanchett and Gary Oldman, which is making for the streaming platform AppleTV +.

We also asked him if he has seen his friend and colleague Guillermo Del Toro’s film Nightmare Alley before and the answer is yes: “It’s a masterpiece! Nightmare Alley is a wonderful masterpiece. I think it’s Guillermo Del Toro at his best: he really is. marvelous.”

Source: MoviePlayer

First trailer for Nightmare Alley; Eli Roth’s History of Horror Season 3 Appearance
Posted on
Sep 16, 2021

First trailer for Nightmare Alley; Eli Roth’s History of Horror Season 3 Appearance

Hi, dear blanchetters!

The long-awaited trailer of Nightmare Alley has been released with the movie poster! Cate will also appear in the season 3 of Eli Roth’s History of Horror which will premiere in October 2021. The series will feature Sam Raimi’s The Gift which Cate starred in. Lastly, they have recently made Vogue Australia’s June/July 2020 cover, where Cate graced the cover, available in print. Check the details about it below.

Nightmare Alley trailer and poster

Screencaptures

Cate Blanchett to appear in Eli Roth’s History of Horror Season 3

The third season of Eli Roth’s History of Horror will return to AMC on Friday, October 1 at 10 pm ET/9c. The premiere episode will be available early on Saturday, September 25 on AMC+. The remaining episodes will be available to AMC+ subscribers on the same day they premiere on air. The upcoming season of Eli Roth’s History of Horror continues to explore the fun and the fear of scary films – both timeless classics and wildly frightening films that flew under the radar. This season will tackle the topics of “Sequels (That Don’t Suck),” “Infections,” “Psychics,” “Apocalyptic Horror,” “Holiday Horror,” and “Mad Scientists.”

Master of Horror Eli Roth, who also executive produces the series, returns as host with an all-star lineup of interviewees including (in alphabetical order) Cate Blanchett, Margaret Cho, Jeffrey Combs, Jamie Lee Curtis, Geena Davis, Lex Scott Davis, Robert Englund, Vanessa Hudgens, Elliott Knight, David Koechner, Christopher Landon, Meat Loaf, Greg Nicotero, Jonah Ray, Giovanni Ribisi, Jessica Rothe, Madeleine Stowe, Quentin Tarantino, Jennifer Tilly, Edgar Wright, Rob Zombie, and many others.

Episode 303 – “Physics” – Premieres Friday, October 15 at 10 pm ET/9c on AMC and AMC+

What’s the downside of having psychic powers? The idea of being able to read minds or manipulate objects without moving a muscle is an attractive fantasy. But what if those powers showed you things you wished you hadn’t seen? What if people wanted to exploit your gift for their own sinister ends? Worse than that: what if someone with psychic abilities turned their powers against you?

Movies about psychics play on the ego of our species – humans rose to the top thanks to their large, multilayered brains – but they also exploit our insecurities. We understand little about cognition and the nature of free will, and we know we’re just a brain tumor away from radical personality shifts and psychotic behavior. The fear of psychic powers gone wrong is the fear of our own turbulent minds.

This episode features a wide range of psychic films made by superstar creators, including David Cronenberg’s Scanners and The Dead Zone, Mike Flanagan’s thrilling adaptation of Stephen King’s Doctor Sleep, Brian DePalma’s The Fury, Sam Raimi’s The Gift, Peter Jackson’s The Frighteners and Tim Burton’s horror/comedy masterpiece Beetlejuice.

Vogue Australia’s June/July 2020 cover with Cate Blanchett now on print

Fiona Lowry is an Archibald Prize-winning artist and has painted Blanchett to create an image that spoke about the moment in time for both artists. Lowry explored the option of painting her work mid-Covid, and her initial thoughts about anxiety about the future, constant cleaning of ourselves and our homes, to becoming an opportunity for reflection and personal change. ‘My initial thought was to see Cate coming out of the water, reflecting an idea of cleansing and renewal. But after we emailed back and forth about what we were experiencing felt, it became about stillness and the idea of solitude and how it can make us reflect. In retrospect it was such a fleeting moment, and the chaos was still swirling around us, but it was a moment I’m sure we will always remember.’

Cate was photographed by her husband, Andrew Upton, at their home in the UK and Fiona describes how ‘I imagined Cate wearing a Vampire’s Wife dress and wonderfully, designer Susie Cave sent some dresses to use for the shoot. Her dresses are so dreamy and nostalgic, and I had read somewhere that she described the dresses as having a ‘subversive mystery’. I also like my paintings to sit within that mystery and often what painting can do is try to unravel or understand the structure of the underlying dream or mystery that we are embedded in.”

Lowry’s paintings are done with acrylic spray paint and have an ethereal and soft dreamy effect. Cate has described the work as wonderful, matching the serenity of her expression.

If you would like to purchase, you can go to FINEPRINT.

Source: Bleeding Cool

May 2021 magazine scans and new Armani Beauty promotional photo
Posted on
Aug 29, 2021

May 2021 magazine scans and new Armani Beauty promotional photo

Hi, blanchetters!

While we are waiting for recent news on Cate, here are some magazine scans from May 2021 which our former admin, Mary, found. Also a never before seen promotional photo for Armani Beauty. Enjoy!

Click image for higher resolution:

MAITÊ – May 2021

Vanity Fair Italia – May 12th 2021