Disclaimer Update & Not Now, Not Ever Book
Posted on
Jun 14, 2022

Disclaimer Update & Not Now, Not Ever Book

Hi, everyone! It has been slow news day as we await for release of Cate’s projects this year and other news — according to Screen Daily the AppleTV+ series, Disclaimer, is still filming in London. On a more recent news, former Prime Minister (Australia) Julia Gillard is releasing a new book which would have a contribution from Cate and other feminist figures.

Disclaimer

Leslie Manville was recently announced as part of the cast of the 7-episode AppleTV+ series. Italian newspaper, il Fatto Quotidiano, is reporting that two episodes of the series will be filmed at Forte dei Marmi in Tuscany, Italy.

Here’s the list of characters the announced cast will be playing in the series:

Cate Blanchett – Catherine Ravenscroft; a successful and respected television documentary journalist whose work has been built on revealing the concealed transgressions of long-respected institutions.

Kevin Kline – Stephen Brigstocke; a widower who wrote an intriguing novel that was sent to Catherine Ravenscroft which reveals a story she had hoped was long buried in the past.

Sacha Baron Cohen – Robert Ravenscroft; Catherine’s husband who is a lawyer (role is not confirmed yet).

Kodi Smit-McPhee – Nicholas Ravenscroft; Catherine and Robert’s son (role is not confirmed yet).

Hoyeon Jung – Kim; Catherine’s assistant who is ambitious, hardworking and eager-to-please, she knows that working for Catherine is going to be her big break.

Louis Partridge – Jonathan Brigstocke; a teenager on his gap year traveling through Italy who allows himself to give in to his deeper desires with unexpected consequences.

Lesley Manville – Nancy Brigstocke, a woman devastated by her young son’s untimely death. Her life has been defined by her grief, and she lives a quiet life with her husband, Stephen.

Not Now, Not Ever Book

Julia Gillard has just announced her explosive new book Not Now, Not Ever set for release this year on 5 October 2022.

Ten years on from her famous Misogyny Speech, Gillard’s new book explores the history and culture of misogyny, while laying out a roadmap for the future. While the past ten years have undeniably seen many changes – and improvements – there is still a long way to go.

With contributions from several authors and experts, the book explores the reality of misogyny in 2022 and provides a look back at how the Misogyny Speech has inspired women since 2012.

With plenty to explore, the book is a well-rounded and highly-anticipated read for anyone hoping to understand the effects of misogyny on modern society. Kathy Lette looks into how the speech has resurfaced on TikTok, while Cate Blanchett, Brittany Higgins and more recall their first time hearing it. Next-generation feminists Sally Scales, Chanel Contos, and Caitlin Figuerado provide inspiring insight, and of course, the echoes of the rallying cry ring through each page: Not now, not ever!

Sources: ScreenDaily; il Fatto Quotidiano; Penguin Books; Variety

VR Project ‘Evolver’ narrated by Cate Blanchett
Posted on
Jun 9, 2022

VR Project ‘Evolver’ narrated by Cate Blanchett

Hi, everyone! The trailer for Evolver which is a “VR Journey of Life and Breath” has been released. The VR project is narrated by Cate Blanchett and is showing at Tribeca Film Festival. She is also an executive producer through Dirty Films.

Cate Blanchett (“Carol”) and Terrence Malick (“The Tree of Life”) have reteamed on “Evolver,” a VR free-roaming, music-filled interactive and transcendental experience which is world premiering at the Tribeca Film Festival.

Produced by the artist collective Marshmallow Laser Feast (“We Live in an Ocean of Air”) in the U.K., Atlas V (“Spheres”) in France and Pressman Film (“The Crow”) in the U.S., “Evolver” is a pioneering experience taking audiences inside the landscape of the body, following the flow of oxygen through a branching ecosystem, to a single ‘breathing’ cell. The experience has been conceived to be replicated and sized up in festivals and museums around the world and can host up to 100 people at the same.

Veteran producer Edward R. Pressman is executive producing with his long-time friend Malick as well as Blanchett, Coco Francini and Andrew Upton through their banner Dirty Films. Pressman and Malick’s first creative collaboration dates back to 1973 with Malick’s feature debut “Badlands.”

Blanchett, who previously worked with Malick on “Knight of Cups” and “Voyage of Time,” was approached by the filmmaker to join “Evolver” and has given it a greater spiritual depth. Blanchett narrates the experience, starting meditation phase during which she reads a poem created by Daisy Lafarge and guides audiences as they connect with their own bodies and the natural world through a cycle of respiration.

“Voicing Evolver was not so much building a character but creating an atmosphere or a state of mind,” Blanchett told Variety. “Working with Marshmallow Laser Feast, I responded not only to the arresting visuals but the resonant poetry of Daisy Lafarge’s text,” Blanchett added.

Blanchett said “Evolver” shares similar themes as “Voyage of Time” as it reflects on the meaning of life. “It’s been an extraordinary thing to be in Terry’s orbit. The thrum of his world view is intoxicating and any chance to be in a dialogue with him I leap towards with open arms,” said Blanchett about reuniting with Malick. “Giving voice to ‘Voyage of Time’ was an eye-opening meditation and Evolver is a wonderful extension of that conversation,” said the Oscar-winning actor.

While Blanchett has voiced several animated features in the past, this marked her first time narrating a VR experiment.

“VR is obviously a much more immersive experience than conventional animation, which the Evolver team has harnessed to a spectacular degree.”

Blanchett described “Evolver” as an “immersive experience on a metaphysical level that” and said she thinks it will “take the participants on a dynamic journey as the work is simultaneously inward and outward facing, encouraging deep introspection and reflection but also inviting people to connect, not only to their own bodies but to the natural world around them.”

Source: Variety

 

 

 

Dirty Films with Origma 45 to produce Noora Niasari’s ‘Shayda’
Posted on
May 22, 2022

Dirty Films with Origma 45 to produce Noora Niasari’s ‘Shayda’

Happy Sunday, everyone!

Dirty Films is going to be producing another movie which is the directorial debut Iranian/Australian writer and director Noora Niasari. It will be led by Iranian actress Zar Amir-Ebrahimi.

Being sold in Cannes by HanWay Films, Niasari’s directorial debut follows a young Iranian mother who finds refuge in an Australian women’s shelter with her six-year-old daughter.

Iranian actress Zar Amir-Ebrahimi (Tehran Taboo, Morgen sind wir frei) is set to star in Shayda, the directorial debut of Iranian/Australian writer/director Noora Niasari. HanWay Films has come on board to handle international sales and distribution, while UTA Independent Film Group is representing the U.S. sale.

Shayda follows a young Iranian mother (Amir-Ebrahimi) and her six-year-old daughter who find refuge in an Australian women’s shelter during the two weeks of Iranian New Year (Nowrooz), which is celebrated as a time of renewal and re-birth. Aided by the strong community of women at the refuge, they seek their freedom in this new world of possibilities, only to find themselves facing the violence they tried so hard to escape.

Shayda is produced by Vincent Sheehan (The Hunter, Jasper Jones, Animal Kingdom, Lore) through his new production venture Origma 45. Cate Blanchett, Andrew Upton and Coco Francini at Dirty Films (Apples, Carol, Little Fish) are executive producers.

“We first encountered Noora’s talent watching her short films, The Phoenix and Tâm. We were blown away by her precise, emotionally-driven filmmaking and her capacity to draw out gripping performances,” said Dirty Films in a statement. “We are excited to be working alongside Vincent again to help Noora fulfil her bold and distinct vision for Shayda.”

Melbourne-based Niasari is well known for her award-winning short films including Waterfall which screened at the 66th Melbourne International Film Festival (MIFF) where it was nominated for best short film, Tâm and feature documentary Casa Antúnez.

Heads of production on the film will include cinematographer and Niasari’s closest collaborator, Sherwin Akbarzadeh (Stories From Oz). Osamah Sami (Ali’s Wedding), Leah Purcell (The Drover’s Wife: The Legend of Molly Johnson), Mojean Aria (The Enforcer), Jillian Nguyen (Expired) and Rina Mousavi (Alexander) will star alongside Amir-Ebrahimi. Production will commence on July 11 in Australia.

“We are delighted to be part of an incredible team supporting Noora Niasari’s feature debut,” said HanWay Films managing director Gabrielle Stewart. “Noora has written a beautiful piece that reflects much of her own experience of moving to Australia as a child. There is an intimacy to her storytelling that brings to life what it is to honor the traditions of the culture you have left behind as a mother raising her young child, whilst together bravely embracing a whole new one.”

Source: THR

Cate Blanchett greets ABC Australia on their anniversary; & boards VR project Evolver
Posted on
May 21, 2022

Cate Blanchett greets ABC Australia on their anniversary; & boards VR project Evolver

Hi, everyone!

Cate has sent a video message greeting ABC Australia on their 90 years. She has also signed on as executive producer, with her co-exec producers at Dirty Films – Andrew Upton and Coco Francini, for Evolver which will also be narrated by her and set to premiere at Tribeca Film Festival in June 2022.

Thank you to Erzsébet for the donation to the site.

Cate Blanchett boards Tribeca-bound VR project ‘Evolver’ as narrator and executive producer

Cate Blanchett is narrating virtual-reality project Evolver and has signed on as an executive producer alongside Terrence Malick and Edward R. Pressman.

Billed as a free-roaming, immersive journey through the breathing body, Evolver is world premiering in competition at the Tribeca Immersive programme at the 2022 Tribeca Festival where it will be presented at 120 Broadway from June 9-19.

The VR experience drops audiences inside the human body, following the flow of oxygen from first intake of breath.

Dirty Films’ Cate Blanchett, Coco Francini and Andrew Upton have boarded Evolver as executive producers. Fellow executive producers Edward R. Pressman and Terrence Malick first collaborated on the independent classic Badlands nearly 50 years ago.

Click the image for more information on the screening time

Sources: Screendaily; Tribeca

Cate Blanchett on Climate of Change Podcast
Posted on
Apr 14, 2022

Cate Blanchett on Climate of Change Podcast

Good day, everyone!

The Climate of Change with Cate Blanchett and Danny Kennedy, which was co-created, co-produced, and co-hosted by Cate, is now available on Audible UK. An outtake from the podcast interview with Prince William was also released. Check them below.

Click image for higher resolution

The six-part series, Climate of Change with Cate Blanchett and Danny Kennedy, will see the Oscar winner explore eco-anxiety and optimism with environmental activist Kennedy, as the pair raise awareness of the emerging technological revolution with the help of some special guests.

“Throughout the series, Cate and Danny speak directly to visionaries and trendsetters who are making innovative strides to turn the tide on climate change, from the Navajo Nation in Arizona to the Australian Outback,” Audible teases.

The guests on the podcast ranges from different backgrounds: former President of Ireland Mary Robinson, social historian Rutger Bregman, Prince William, 2021 Earthshot Finalists and Winners, economic thought leader and author Tony Seba and Agamemnon Otero, Katy Milkman, author and inventor Saul Griffith, director Adam McKay (Don’t Look Up), artist Luke Jerram (Gaia), fashion activist Livia Firth and musician Imogen Heap.

Click the image to be redirected to Audible UK where you can listen to clips or full episodes.

Climate of Change

Climate of Change Promotional

Promotional Screencaptures

Source: Radio Times, Audible UK

Stateless wins at Screen Producers Australia Award; & New Magazine Scan
Posted on
Mar 30, 2022

Stateless wins at Screen Producers Australia Award; & New Magazine Scan

Hi, everyone!

Slow news day on Cate but Stateless won at this year’s (SPA) Screen Producers Australia’s Award. Stateless is based on the idea by Cate, she is a co-creator and co-executive producer on the series. The series is available to stream on Netflix (outside Australia). There’s also a new magazine scan from Palace Scope.

Screen Producers Australia Awards 2022 Winners

“Every year, the SPA Awards are an acknowledgement of Australian screen industry excellence, uplifting diverse, locally-made productions with cultural impact and worldwide reach. Alongside the Queensland Government as Principal Partners, Screen Queensland is proud to have brought Screen Forever back to the Gold Coast — a globally renowned screen industry hub and a dazzling setting for tonight’s celebrations,” said Screen Queensland CEO Kylie Munnich.

“SPA members continuously raise the global bar for creativity and skillful producing, and tonight that talent was on full show. The task at hand is storytelling, and the winners of our 2022 Awards take this task seriously. They understand the significance of their work and the contribution it makes to the Australian economy, generating jobs for local creatives, and showcasing Australia and its unique heritage to millions around the world,” said SPA CEO Matthew Deaner.

Telemovie or Mini-Series Production of the Year (Tie)
• A Sunburnt Christmas – Every Cloud Productions
• Alice-Miranda Friends Forever – SLR Productions
• Hungry Ghosts – Matchbox Pictures
• Operation Buffalo – Porchlight Films
Stateless – Matchbox Pictures
• The Gloaming – The Two Jons
• The Secrets She Keeps – Lingo Pictures
• The Unusual Suspects – Aquarius Films

Palace Scope – March 23rd 2022

Source: TVTonight

Cate Blanchett: “I want to spend more time being myself”
Posted on
Mar 13, 2022

Cate Blanchett: “I want to spend more time being myself”

Happy Sunday, everyone!

A new interview with Cate has been released. This is a Google translated interview from Spanish to English.

Cate Blanchett: “I spend most of my time being someone else. I want to spend more time being myself.”

Other than her two Oscars, Cate has added in recent weeks from Europe the first International Goya and a César for her entire career. Actress, producer, and farmer, the versatile Australian performer, also an ambassador for Armani fragrances, she confesses that with age she feels more limitations when it comes to acting. She laments that she is sometimes still the only woman on a shoot and she fears that the platforms will become monopolies.

Cate Blanchett (Melbourne, 52 years old) thinks there are too many awards. And she knows what she’s talking about. Because she has almost all of them: two Oscars, three Baftas, three Golden Globes and three from the Screen Actors Guild. As if they weren’t enough, she has now embarked on the conquest of Europe. She has just received an Honorary César in Paris and a month ago she picked up the International Goya from Pedro Almodóvar, with whom she is going to shoot the first film in English by the Spanish director, A Manual for Cleaning Women. She welcomes us in Valencia, hours before hugging him and thanking him for a recognition that serves to strengthen ties with the Latin film industry. She wears trainers and a metallic pink suit by Giorgio Armani, the firm whose line of fragrances is an ambassador. Under the jacket, the skin, and around her neck, several golden chains with padlocks and snake heads that she plays with as she speaks. After premiering Nightmare Alley last February under the direction of Guillermo del Toro and dazzling the world with her false teeth in Don’t Look Up, she says she wants to spend more time playing herself. Normal: the character is exciting.

In an interview Julia Roberts did for Interview Magazine, you said that as you gets older, you find acting more and more humiliating.

It gets more difficult. Why? I think that when you work in the artistic field — also if you are, for example, a writer—, this field becomes more and more entangled in your life. I spend most of my time being someone else, and I think I want to spend more time being myself. Also, as an actor you are very exposed. I do not know how to explain it. Six years ago [photographer and artist] Cindy Sherman started using digital effects to create her works [in which she often appears]. And people threw their hands in their heads because she had always used prosthetics and had worked her body as if it were a malleable object. She simply explained that she had reached an age where she was less malleable. And that she had to resort to digital technology to maintain the same skill.

Is it the same as an actor?

You feel a bit the same, that your palette is getting smaller and smaller. But the truth is that I am not very interested in digital advances. What I like are magic tricks, I still scream when someone does one in front of me. Because with magic you become an accomplice: you know you are being deceived, but in the digital universe you don’t know what is real and what isn’t. It’s like when you see Gary Oldman without prosthetics or digital treatment, the interpretation of him is something that he builds from the inside and you believe it. He is really inspiring. I’ve worked with digital retouching on The Curious Case of Benjamin Button and, yes, it can be liberating, but in the end, as you get older, you face more and more of your limitations, and that’s humbling.

Is the film industry easier for women now than when you started?

If we keep talking about it, the problem still exists. But we have to keep talking and working on it until it is no longer a topic of conversation. Sometimes I keep walking on set and there are 30 men and I’m the only woman, and I think, “This is so out of sync with what’s going on in society. How is it possible for us to connect with the audience like this?” When you’re in a predominantly male or white work environment, it feels old-fashioned and you feel like it’s also starting to be irrelevant. I think there has been a big change. But you have to stand firm and understand that changes are very fragile, as is democracy. So you have to persevere.

You were artistic director of the Sydney Theater Company. Has that experience influenced your way of understanding her work as an actress?

We were not only artistic directors [and her husband, screenwriter and playwright Andrew Upton], but also CEO, so we were responsible for the financial and creative health of the company. And many times these two aspects are conceived as mutually exclusive. But they don’t have to be: throughout my career I’ve worked with producers who are amazing at keeping finances in order while also helping with creative decisions.

Is that producer profile in danger of extinction?

Yes, unfortunately, because it is something I aspire to. It’s not all about being in front of the camera. I don’t feel obligated. No longer. I’ve already done it. I’ve bored the audience enough already. I do not need it. No more.

Throughout your career you have played everything from action characters to femme fatales, through comedic roles or even men, such as Bob Dylan. How do you choose your characters? Is there any kind of woman you would never play?

Many decisions are based on instinct and timing. I have a wonderful and great life, with a lot of commitments and things that interest me, starting with my farm, with my sheep, my pigs, my cows, and with my children, of course. So sometimes not all projects fit into my schedule. But nothing happens. There is no need to bleed for it. You have to let them go. It’s one of the best things the film industry has taught me.

The fact that?

You make a film and you let it go because after your work comes post-production work and finally, if you’re lucky, it reaches the public. And by that time you will have already done one or two other things. And that film happens to become a kind of second cousin. And then, hopefully, you can see it again with fresh eyes and appreciate it.

What do you expect now from A Manual for Cleaning Women, your project with Almodóvar?

We had talked many times about working together, but it was never the right time. He is a man of incredible taste and insight. He is very precise and, like his films, very free. We are very aligned and excited about the project. I love it because he works with his heart and with his hands. And with his head, of course. He is a person very connected with what happens in the world, but at the same time someone who follows his own path. So I think this project will be unique. His work has a clearly Spanish framework, but it has always transcended and has been recognized internationally because it connects very well with American concerns: the family, being outside the majority culture, being an outcast. I think it’s going to be a fascinating journey in search of that hybrid between the American and the Latin experience.

You have a master’s degree in that Latino perspective. You have worked with Alejandro Cuarón, Guillermo del Toro and now Almodóvar. Is there something that differentiates Latino directors from the rest?

They all have incredible hearts and a certain brutality, but not in the bad sense of the word. I mean they don’t run away from things that others prefer not to name. And they are profoundly plastic artists. His intellectual pursuits are very sumptuous to digest visually. Latino and Australian directors have a very special, unique vision of the world, and that is why they have more and more weight in the US film industry.

I said before that Almodóvar was a very precise director. Is he the kind of director you like to work with, someone who gives a lot of directions and controls every detail?

I think the project is what dictates how you have to work. For me, the perfect thing is to have a clear line of communication with the director based on trust, because there are moments in the shoot when you have to say that something is rubbish, and you have to know that it comes and is said from respect. Rehearsals and filming are not always friendly. They are not disrespectful, but sometimes you have to fight a thing to the bottom and it’s not comfortable.

Woody Allen even told you on the first day of shooting Blue Jasmine that the take was horrible, and so were you.

But in the end I realized that the location was wrong, the camera was wrong… so we changed everything. And then the scene was cut, it was never in the final footage. You can’t take it personally, you have to listen to it and think that it’s teamwork, that sometimes a director can say something challenging but it doesn’t necessarily have to be about you, but about the product.

How do you feel that the film and fiction industry has changed in recent years with the emergence of platforms and the rise of series? Are you interested in that new channel?

Well, I did Mrs. America (Hulu) with a group of fabulous women. And there are a couple of projects in development that look very good. But in the end, what interests me are really lasting experiences, although only time can tell which ones will be. On the one hand, streaming platforms represent a wonderful opportunity for the audience and also for a lot of people in the industry who have stayed afloat for these two years thanks to them. But this model cannot go forward without being examined.

What is the perceived risk?

It is necessary to analyze the potential monopolies that are emerging from this format, and that are not good for anyone. They are not good creatively and neither for the public. And, of course, they have never been good for the industry. We do not want to replicate the old studio system in a more radical and irrevocable way. I am worried about this. Very worried.

Do you think this system of monopolies is accelerating?

Yes, and I think the public can perceive it. Because everything looks alike. The offer is uniform. There is nothing special anymore. However, going to the movies is still an event.

But after the pandemic, due to fear or routine, cinemas continue to lose viewers, at least that is what is happening in Spain.

Yes, and also in the United States there are a lot of small theaters that have been acquired by the platforms to project their content. But there are still places like a small theater in Pittsburgh called Row House and that has only 50 seats where retrospectives of Tarkovsky, of Wes Anderson are shown… I am confident in that differential value that the cinema can continue to offer and that people appreciate you can still be interested.

The pandemic has changed our consumption patterns, but also other industry tools such as awards and red carpets. Do they still make sense?

I think there are too many prizes. They all look the same and people are tired. But this was already happening before the pandemic. So I think we have to be critical. We have a very good opportunity to change things: to ask ourselves what we want to do, what we want it to look like and, above all, if bigger is always synonymous with better. And I’m not just talking about red carpets, but events in general. We don’t want to go back to that old narrative. I personally don’t want to go back to the good old days because I think they weren’t really that good.

But in the end the old physical events have their magic. Even Giorgio Armani, the first designer to suspend a show due to COVID, has returned to the physical catwalk with guests.

It is a live event. That is why the performing arts are so special. When you walk into a room and you can see the fabrics, hear the music, you are there. You remember. But I think the key is the same in fashion as it is in film. Mr. Armani is always aware of every detail. Even at his age, he is a tireless worker and his control over the quality of the products is incredible. He thinks the more you do, the less special he is. And this happens in all industries, including the film industry.

Source: EL PAÍS

Cate Blanchett to star and produce Australian movie – The New Boy
Posted on
Feb 10, 2022

Cate Blanchett to star and produce Australian movie – The New Boy

Hi, everyone!

Cate will be starring and producing a new movie that is set in Australia. You can read the details below.

Cate Blanchett’s Dirty Films and Scarlett Pictures are partnering to co-produce The New Boy with Blanchett attached to star and Warwick Thornton writing and directing. Deborah Mailman and Wayne Blair join Blanchett in the ensemble, which is set to begin filming in October in South Australia.

Roadshow Films will be distributing for Australia and New Zealand, CAA Media Finance and UTA will be handling sales for North America, and The Veterans is on board to manage sales for the remainder of the globe. Blanchett, Andrew Upton and Georgie Pym will be producing for Dirty Films, and Kath Shelper will produce for Scarlett Pictures.

“What a joy to finally be collaborating with Warwick — a filmmaker whose warmth, wit and humanity we have admired for so very long,” Blanchett said. “We can’t wait to be on the ground with him and the wonderful Kath Shelper to realise this startling story.”

Set in 1940s Australia, the film depicts depicts the mesmeric story of a 9-year-old Aboriginal orphan boy who arrives in the dead of night at a remote monastery run by a renegade nun (Blanchett). The new boy’s presence disturbs the delicately balanced world in this story of spiritual struggle and the cost of survival.

“The idea for the story of this little boy has been flickering in my imagination for a long time,” said Thornton. “Kath and I are beyond excited to be working with Cate and the Dirty Films mob to put him up on the big screen where he belongs.”

Source: Deadline

Don’t Look Up theatrical and streaming release date
Posted on
Aug 24, 2021

Don’t Look Up theatrical and streaming release date

Hi, everyone!

We now have a confirmed release date for Don’t Look Up where Cate plays Brie Evantee. For anyone interested, TIFF released screening schedule for Burning, the Aussie documentary that Dirty Films produced. Virtual screening is only available in Canada. Click here for schedule.

Netflix has announced release dates for its entire fall and winter film slate, a list of buzzy films that includes “Don’t Look Up,” a dark comedy starring Jennifer Lawrence and Leonardo DiCaprio and directed by Adam McKay; Jane Campion’s drama “The Power of the Dog” with Benedict Cumberbatch, Kirsten Dunst and Jesse Plemons; and Rebecca Hall’s directorial debut “Passing.”

To close out the year, Campion’s latest “The Power of the Dog” arrives on Netflix on Dec. 1 (in theaters on Nov. 17), with “Don’t Look Up” scheduled for Dec. 24 (in theaters Dec. 10) and Maggie Gyllenhaal’s “The Lost Daughter” on Dec. 31 (in theaters Dec. 17).

Source: Variety

Cate Blanchett gives $100,000 to help Kiwi and Aussie actors; & Dirty Films-produced documentary Burning to premiere at TIFF
Posted on
Aug 13, 2021

Cate Blanchett gives $100,000 to help Kiwi and Aussie actors; & Dirty Films-produced documentary Burning to premiere at TIFF

Hi, blanchetters!

Cate has donated to a non-profit organization in New Zealand in support of actors affected by the pandemic. Also, the Australian documentary Burning which is executive produced by Dirty Films will have it’s world premiere at Toronto International Film Festival.

Cate Blanchett gives $100,000 to help down-on-luck Kiwi and Aussie actors

Oscar-winning actor Cate Blanchett reached into her own pocket to quietly donate money for a fund to help New Zealand and Australian actors who have fallen on hard times during the Covid-19 pandemic.

Musical theatre royalty Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice are also understood to have played a part in raising money for the new fund.

The non-profit New Zealand Actors Benevolent Fund (NZABF) has been established to help actors, with the board run by Jennifer Ward-Lealand, actor and president of actors’ union Equity New Zealand. Its creation will be announced during October in a drive dubbed “ACTober”

But NZABF board member Jeff Szusterman? said Blanchett became a patron of an alliance was formed with five similar Australian funds when Covid-19 hit. She had personally donated about $100,000 to it.

Blanchett is Australian but spent time in New Zealand when she starred as Galadriel? in Sir Peter Jackson’s Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit.

Eva Orner’s documentary Burning executive produced by Dirty Films to premiere at 2021 TIFF

The Toronto International Film Festival announced which films will fill the TIFF Docs, Midnight Madness, and Wavelength sections at this year’s edition of the event, which runs from Sept. 9-18. The festival also added new titles to the Special Presentation and Contemporary World Cinema programs.

Eva Orner’s Burning, about Australia’s devastating ‘Black Summer’, will make its world premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF) in September.

Produced by Propagate Content, Dirty Films and Amazon Studios, the film marks Amazon’s first feature-length Australian documentary commission. To screen as part of the TIFF Docs strand, it explores what happened during the 2019 and 2020 bushfires from the perspective of victims, activists and scientists, as well as the lack of political will to address climate change.

In addition to directing, Orner executive produces alongside Cate Blanchett.

Burning is one of two Australian films selected for this year’s TIFF, the other being Jane Campion’s drama The Power of the Dog, a New Zealand co-production, which will play as a special presentations following its Venice bow.

This year’s TIFF, with more than 100 films in selection, is a hybrid event, with in person and digital screenings.

Burning will launch on Amazon Prime Video later this year in 240 countries and territories around the world.

Sources: Stuff, TIFF, IF, Variety