Cate Blanchett wins her second Volpi Cup Award for Best Actress
Posted on
Sep 14, 2022

Cate Blanchett wins her second Volpi Cup Award for Best Actress

Hi, everyone!

Cate Blanchett is now a two-time Volpi Cup Best Actress winner. She previously won the award for her role as Jude Quinn in Todd Haynes’ I’m Not There, and last Saturday (September 10th) she has been the awarded the Volpi Cup for the second time for her role as Lydia Tár in Todd Field’s TÁR where she has been receiving critical acclaim. She is the fourth actress to win the award twice — joining Shirley MacLaine, Isabelle Huppert, and Valeria Golino.

Cate Blanchett with her Volpi Cup Award photographed by Greg Williams

Closing Ceremony

Red carpet arrival 28:45; Volpi Cup for Best Actress Award 2:03:35

Red Carpet
Closing Ceremony
Winners Photocall

Press Conference Winners

Main Competition winners 38:35

Winners Press Con
Photographed by Greg Williams

 

 

TÁR world premiere at 79th Venice Film Festival
Posted on
Sep 8, 2022

TÁR world premiere at 79th Venice Film Festival

Hi, everyone!

A week ago today, TÁR had it’s premiere at the 79th Venice Film Festival where the movie and Cate Blanchett had received rave reviews. It was reported that the movie received a standing ovation that went on for over six minutes. TÁR is an original screenplay by director Todd Field and his first film in 16 years. He said during the press conference of the movie that he wrote it for Cate Blanchett. Blanchett plays the titular character, the fictional Lydia Tár, who is considered to be one of the greatest conductor and is the first female conductor of a major German orchestra. The movie had also it’s North American premiere in Telluride this past weekend. Before it’s October 7th release in the US it will have it’s New York premiere on October 3rd as part of New York Film Festival main slate then it will be released across the globe around January-February 2023.

We have gathered video interviews and some of the reviews on the film. You can check them below.

Day 1

On the first day of the festival, Cate Blanchett arrived where she did some interviews for TÁR then attended a dinner organized by Armani Beauty in honor of Regé-Jean Page, who is the face of Armani Code men’s fragrance.

79th Venice Film Festival – Day 1
Armani Beauty Dinner
Photographed by Greg Williams

‘Tár’ Earns Ecstatic 6-Minute Standing Ovation in Venice, Generating Instant Oscar Buzz

The 79th Venice Film Festival officially kicked off the fall Oscar race on Thursday afternoon with Todd Field’s “Tár,” a drama starring Cate Blanchett as a famous composer embroiled in a public scandal. The film was showered with an ecstatic six-minute standing ovation as the audience inside the Sala Grande Theatre kept chanting “Bravo!“

Clutching the hand of festival chief Alberto Barbera, Blanchett took a bow — but the clapping continued and even grew louder. When the applause finally ended, a misty-eyed Blanchett turned to someone on her team and said: “Let’s get a drink.”

Indeed, Blanchett’s work in “Tár” will likely be one of the most toasted performances of Oscar season. The enthusiastic reviews for the film all but guarantee Blanchett will land her eighth Oscar nomination for acting. (She’s already won two Academy Awards — for 2005’s “The Aviator” and 2014’s “Blue Jasmine” — but “Tár” is bound to stir up speculation that she could take home a third statuette in March 2023.)

Please be aware that some reviews and interviews with the cast and director include spoiler from the movie.

Day 2

79th Venice Film Festival – Day 2

Photocall

TÁR Photocall

Press Conference

TÁR Press Con begins at 2:22:00

TÁR Press Conference

Red Carpet

TÁR Premiere Arrivals

Video from Il Gazzettino

Cate Blanchett arrives at around 32:00

TÁR Red Carpet

Reviews

In Tár, Cate Blanchett Gives a Dazzling Performance as an Orchestra Conductor on the Edge

In writer-director Todd Field’s dazzling, uncompromising high-wire act Tár—playing at the 79th Venice Film Festival—Cate Blanchett plays Lydia Tár, a conductor at the top of her game, and of her world. We don’t see her struggling to be the best, or complaining about how hard it is to be recognized in a field dominated by men. In fact, she believes women conductors have no reason to complain about disadvantage or discrimination. While men often use money and power to fuel their sense of entitlement, Lydia stakes her claim on her own intelligence. She takes what she wants from people and leaves scorched earth behind. She’s great and awful in equal measure, so compelling you can’t turn away from her, but also touching in a way that never courts our pity. She’s unlike anyone we’ve ever seen onscreen, which may help explain why this is only Field’s third movie as a director, even though he has worked steadily through the years as an actor: he’s obviously a guy who waits for the right one to come along.

Tár, Field’s first film in 16 years, is extraordinary. It’s also, in places, disconcertingly chilly and remote, possibly the kind of movie that’s easier to love than it is to like. But people will surely be talking about it, and about Blanchett’s performance specifically. Blanchett, though extremely gifted, can be excessively mannered. (Her 2014 Oscar-winning role in Blue Jasmine is Exhibit A; she hits each Blanche du Bois-inflected note with tuning-fork precision.) But she can also be a performer of great, near-alien strangeness and beauty, and that’s the subterranean current she’s tapping as Lydia Tár. This is a willful, charismatic performance, stubborn and elegant as a vine.

Field’s previous two films were adapted from previously existing sources: In the Bedroom, from 2001, was drawn from an Andre Dubus short story, and Little Children, from 2006, was based on Tom Perrotta’s novel of the same name. But Tár, he has said, was written specifically for Blanchett, and his surefooted direction makes the most of her every line and gesture. When Blanchett as Lydia stands before her musicians, she’s so open she may as well be listening through every pore. In her kingdom of woodwinds and strings, she can hear things we can’t, like the rush of wind beneath a bird’s wing—she knows intuitively whether that whoosh is too loud or too soft, and she can shift it accordingly. Blanchett learned to speak German, play piano and conduct an orchestra for the role, though what she does goes beyond mere research and memorization. Her movements are precise, definitive, balletic: Blanchett plays a woman who knows what she was born to do, and the thrill of it sets her eyes ablaze. Tár doesn’t offer anything as comfortable as redemption, and it asks us to fall in love, at least a little, with a tyrant. But how often do we see women portrayed this way, as magnificent rather than admirable? Lydia Tár is the antithesis of tote-bag feminism, not least because she knows that the power of a question is greater than that of a slogan.

Full review on TIME

TÁR: a sly, scabrous symphony

Cate Blanchett is mesmerizing as a monstrous orchestra conductor in Todd Field’s latest masterpiece, one of the most grippingly brilliant films of the year.

Todd Field’s TÁR is a two-hour-38-minute slow dive into the increasingly alienating psychology of a world-famous orchestra conductor. It moves to a rarefied tempo: philharmonic politics, contested cello solo auditions and live-recording contract negotiations for one of Mahler’s more daunting works. It is replete with classical-music-world in-jokes and casually caustic namedrops that must mystify anyone who failed to graduate from Juilliard with honors before pursuing a doctorate in Advanced Stravinsky. It has absolutely no business being even remotely watchable, and yet here it is, one of the most grippingly brilliant films of the year, featuring, in Cate Blanchett’s mesmerizing central turn, perhaps the season’s first truly irreplaceable star performance.

Full review on Sight and Sound

‘Tár’ Review: Cate Blanchett Orchestrates Her Own Destruction

“TÁR” is so much more than the Great American Movie about “cancel culture” — a phrase that it humiliates with every movement — but this dense and difficult portrait of a female conductor’s fall from grace also demands to be seen through that singular lens from its very first shot. Todd Field’s thrilling, deceptively austere third film exalts in grabbing the electrified fence of digital-age discourse with both hands and daring us to hold onto it for 158 minutes in the hopes that we might ultimately start to feel like we’re shocking ourselves.

The “Little Children” maestro’s first movie in 16 years — and the only original screenplay he’s ever directed — isn’t quite the ultra-mordant satire you might imagine if someone just told you where its final scene takes place. On the contrary, Field has come back to us with a savage yet acutely sincere character study that’s slathered in a million shades of gray. “TÁR” tells the story of a trailblazing woman whose aspiration to embody the grandeur of the past makes her vulnerable to the uniquely modern pitfalls of the present. The film is every bit as brilliant and implosive as she is.

Cate Blanchett makes for a magnificent 21st century Icarus. Expertly weaponizing her inimitable gravitas away from art and towards predatory self-preservation instead, the “Carol” star commands the movie’s lengthy and unbroken scenes as if she were conducting them herself; as Lydia gradually loses her ability to modulate the tempo of the world around her, “TÁR” finds a sickening pleasure in the dissonance between a spiraling character and an actor in perfect control of her instrument.

We’ve seen Blanchett play women on the verge of a nervous breakdown before, but she’s never obliterated herself on screen with such concussive force. The controlled demolition of a performance she delivers here provides a more nuanced (and cautiously sympathetic) interpretation of the social dynamics behind the #MeToo movement than any male actor or character might be able to offer. It’s because of Blanchett that “TÁR” is able to elevate the uselessly outmoded paradigm of separating the art from the artist into the visceral portrait of an artist separating from herself.

Full review on Indiewire

Cate Blanchett May Have Found Her Magnum Opus in the Tremendous TÁR\

The film is loaded with references to high-culture figures, to literature, to music theory. It all sounds pretty impressive. Which is the point: how often have we been so glamoured by smarts and talent and accomplishment that we miss an obvious pattern, or disregard contrary narratives as bitter noise? TÁR offers itself up as instructive tool, diligently tearing down the specific mythos that Field has worked so meticulously to create.

Somehow, this all happens without the moralistic droning of a lecture. TÁR is breathtaking entertainment, beautifully tailored in luxe, eerie Euro sleekness by production designer Marco Bittner Rosser and cinematographer Florian Hoffmeister, and ominously scored by Hildur Guðnadóttir (who gets a little meta shout-out in the film). That fine craftsmanship is all anchored by Blanchett’s alternately measured and ferocious performance, a tremendous (but never outsized) piece of acting that is her most piercing work in years. Alluring and frighteningly vituperative, Lydia is a beguiling creation, all the more villainous for the beauty that birthed her.

Full review on Vanity Fair

Tár review by Guy Lodge

From the get-go, then, Tár aims to disrupt conventional rhythms — as does its eponymous protagonist Lydia Tár (Blanchett), a celebrated classical conductor known worldwide for her unorthodox approach to music, but known only to her most intimate inner circle for personal dealings that cross the line from unorthodox to dysfunctionally toxic. She has every award available to her art, her lifelong dream job conducting the Berlin Philharmonic, a cavernous Architectural Digest apartment that she shares with her beautiful, gifted violinist partner Sharon (Nina Hoss) and their angelic moppet of a daughter — everything, in other words. And when has having everything ever boded well for a character? Tár feels jinxed from the film’s first full scene, an agonisingly obsequious onstage Q&A — played by Blanchett with a performative graciousness that feels wryly knowing and meta — in which her manifold achievements are trotted out like a list of potential charges against her.

Yet it takes us time to spot the makings of her downfall, in part because Field’s film so cleverly guards our access to her, gradually peeling away her shellacked layers of public decorum and lucidity and wit, making us — and, one feels, the forever surrounded Tár — wait and wait to get her alone. This isn’t a typically romantic portrait of unhinged genius: the maestro (and don’t you dare call her maestra) here has an implacable core of self-knowledge and self-belief that make her spiralling sociopathic impulses all the harder to square with her sleek-suited image. Suffice it to say that MeToo-era queries of abuse, offence and cancellation are raised in the film’s complex, prickly inquiry; you can probably guess that Field and Blanchett have no interest in tidy answers.

Not since Carol has Blanchett got to negotiate this degree of inner turmoil on screen; not since her Oscar-winning turn in Blue Jasmine has a part stretched to both the most icily contained and hotly raging extremes of her range. In a film expressly about the power granted by untouchable brilliance, hers makes this impossible moral minefield of a woman warm to the touch; the unpredictable tics and intricately detailed facial maps of thinking that she grants Tár make this nearly three-hour film consistently riveting, as tense as it is languid.

Full review here.

Interview

Cate Blanchett changes music and conquers Venice with the film Tàr by director Todd Field

The first noteworthy style is the look of our conductor, Lydia Tár, a.k.a the shining Cate Blanchett; a tailor-made men’s suit, a white shirt, the blond hair on her shoulders, freshly combed, and pale make-up showcased both on the podium and in the brutalist house she shares in Berlin with her violinist wife Sharon (Nina Hoss). In rhythm, in heartbeats, in the mathematical simplicity of music is defined Lydia’s imaginary life, told in Todd Field’s film Tár, which narrates the rise and fall of the Berlin Philharmonic’s film female conductor. Cate, good friend of the Venice Film Festival, whom she supported in attendance in the darkest moments of the Covid pandemic, returns to shine, with a role tailored to her legend: a eulogy of emancipation in a world as separate and non-inclusive as the world of classical music, but spiced up with the complexities of the decision-making and the dramas of the post #MeToo era. “My character”, said the actress, “is enigmatic, she confronts power and is at the top of her career, a loner in the female world. But her life is difficult, the big apparatuses and financiers press her; every time she must prove something more. Such a struggle exhausts her. It is always more difficult for a woman in a top position”. Tár is a film with a very broad and visionary ambition, for which the Australian Blanchett studied piano, an American accent, German, and posture to be able to conduct the orchestra from the podium in a credible way. Venice is already ready to beat time with her, Cate, an absolute icon who certainly mirrors Lydia’s passion, success, and eagerness to live.

Press Junket

Day 3

79th Venice Film Festival – Day 3
Source: Variety, Elle Italia,

Cate Blanchett on Vanity Fair European Edition
Posted on
Aug 31, 2022

Cate Blanchett on Vanity Fair European Edition

Hi, Cate Blanchett fans!

TÁR’s premiere is upon us but before that Cate Blanchett has appeared on three different covers for Vanity Fair, while this is not the first time she has appeared on multiple covers for the same issue, this is the first time where it is multiple covers for three different countries (France, Italy, and Spain) released at the same time. Vanity Fair France, Italy, and Spain September 2022 issue go on sale today, August 31st. Check out the interview and photos below.

Vanity Fair France — We made this singular choice for the cover of this September Issue, with this portrait of Cate Blanchett photographed by the duo Luigi and Iango. The session took place in London at the beginning of the summer and each edition of Vanity Fair in Europe could choose its image of the Australian star for the front page. We let you imagine the debates within our editorial staff, on the framing, the intensity of the gaze and the chroma. Is black and white the subtraction of life and color? Or the multiplication of contrasts and emotion? We leave you to judge.

Vanity Fair Italy — Three different covers, an international diva and a couple of the most important photographers in the world. To celebrate the Venice Film Festival, Vanity Fair arrives on newsstands with a triple European special edition dedicated to Cate Blanchett, the artist who presents the film Tár in competition at the Venetian festival.

The actress was photographed exclusively by Luigi & Iango, a duo of star photographers with whom the magazine has started a collaboration that will see new and surprising chapters over the next year.

Vanity Fair Spain — The Australian actress returns to the big screen as the protagonist of Tár, the new film by Todd Field. Regarding her presentation at the Venice Film Festival, Antonella Bussi talks via video call with Cate Blanchett about this film in which she gives life to an orchestra conductor and where, among others, topics such as the culture of cancellation and the use of power.

VANITY FAIR European Edition – September 2022
This is a google translated interview from Spanish to English. You can find the link to the original text in Spanish, Italian and French below.

In Tár, Todd Field’s latest film, actress Cate Blanchett plays an orchestra conductor, a role for which she had to become familiar with a job traditionally attributed to men. It is one of the most anticipated projects among those that will be presented these days at the Venice Film Festival, and it deals with issues such as the fear of the passage of time, the abuse of power or the cancellation policy. Many times we have needed female examples that make us believe that evolution is possible, that male hegemony is a questionable totem. “In principle, the conductor should have been a man, in which case perhaps we would talk about it in another way. But the fact that she is a woman takes us into a space from which we can look at the issue more impartially,” the Australian tells us in our cover interview. Art has to be years ahead of society for us to visualize goals and imagine other possible futures. And for that we need the cinema, we need the stars that inspire us, we need Blanchett, sure of herself and sure of working with Field. There is always something exciting about mythical and unprolific authors. Every time they open their mouths we are sure that they will say important things.

If in September 2020, the first year of the pandemic, Cate Blanchett (Ivanhoe, Australia, 1969) presided over the Venice Film Festival jury with her resilient spirit, now, two years later, the actress returns to the Lido to compete in an edition that promises to be full of great stories and illustrious names. In the long afternoon video call that we share, Blanchett tells us about the topics that Tár addresses, the film in which she is the absolute protagonist. I log in ahead of time and am surprised to see that she’s already there. The black screen is named after Cate Upton. It is the surname of her husband, Andrew, the Australian playwright and filmmaker with whom she has been married for 25 years. She wears her hair up, glasses, a beige linen suit, and no makeup. Her voice sounds powerful: “I was looking at email,” she clarifies with her kitchen as a backdrop.

Tár is the long-awaited film by Todd Field, who returns to directing 15 years after his success with Little Children. Lydia Tár, the character played by Blanchett, is a conductor in full professional swing, but also a woman whose shadows are accentuated by the world in which she moves.

— Tár is a brave film. What was it that convinced you to play the lead?

— Look, first of all, it’s already rare for Todd to make a movie. So I wasted no time when he called me on the phone to tell me “I have a script”. And in general, I tend to be slow. I have a thousand things to think about and it takes me two weeks to read a script, but I devoured this one in 24 hours. It was very visceral. I felt that it was about something that affected my body and my spirit. That, coupled with the desire to work with Todd, was decisive in convincing me.

—How does one prepare to play a conductor?

— I asked a friend who is and I realized that it is a bit like being the center of the stage: if you do not have the perception of space, if you do not occupy it, the public does not follow you, does not know where to look or takes you seriously.

I have to be honest: on the one hand I was terrified like never before in my life. There was the pandemic, I had also lived through it, so the musicians had not played important works for a long time and, as if that were not enough, when I raised my arm to mark the rhythm I did it a little out of time. But then I realized that they needed me and I desperately needed them, and somehow the music would flow. I learned the gestures and I am unable to express how wonderful it is to feel how the music flows. It is an engaging experience!

—Indeed, it must be incredible that so many people depend on your gestures.

— All the conductors I have consulted have told me that you have to dominate the podium, you cannot show weakness. It’s a trick, like those of theater actors. You have to pretend that you know what you’re doing even if that’s not the case, it’s a question of leadership. In Australia, I participated in a leadership program and we wonder what it will be like to lead in 20, 30, 50 years. My suspicion is that being a leader will have to include the ability to say “I don’t know” or “I don’t know yet.” Have doubts and admit them. But nowadays the model is different: if you are a leader you have to say “I know, so follow me”. It’s a problem, but that’s the way things are today.

—Lydia, the protagonist, seems to experience in first person all those great issues that today divide public opinion. The first of them, that of age and the passage of time…

— Lydia is turning 50, a special moment in anyone’s life. At that point, you are aware of everything you have already done and wonder how much time you have left and what to do with it. You are at the peak of your life and your career. But what happens when you start to descend from the mountain? We always talk about success, but the path to get there is, without a doubt, much easier than that of relegation, that of failure. That is the theme of the film.

— Another issue raised by the film is the use of power by those who occupy a dominant position. Lydia, for example, uses her charisma to obtain sexual favors, to not always be correct or honest…

— Certainly. And clearly that is unacceptable. The power system can lead anyone to separate from herself. In principle, the conductor should have been a man, in which case we might talk about the subject in another way. But the fact that she is a woman brings us to a space from which we can analyze the matter more impartially. The world of classical music is one of masters, comparisons to composers of the past, and greatness that raises the question of what is allowed in the pursuit of excellence. The question is simple: “What are we allowed once we occupy a position of power? To what extent might the prodigies you meet have been corrupted by it? The film deliberately avoids giving an answer and perhaps doesn’t want to give one either, because questions are always more powerful than any answer. At this historical moment it is interesting to first understand what is happening, without judging. The power of art lies precisely in that: in helping us understand what is in front of us and only then allowing us to judge it.

—Lydia has a partner and an adopted daughter whom she loves and professes great tenderness. In it there is family intimacy but also an opposite desire, that of escaping.

— She is restless because sometimes, when things are going well for you, you feel the need to break them. For artists, creating something often means making something else die. Of course, that’s not what I do, but I get it.

—The film also addresses the issue of cancel culture, of suppression in the name of political correctness. What do you think about that?

— Making movies, music, theater or art is not a political act. What can become so is the way it is spread, digested and processed, but its production itself is not. In my opinion, the reflection that must be done is another: what do we study? I am in favor of studying how things happen in a historical context and asking questions. For example: how did women think at a certain time? Certain ideas today may seem dangerous, but erasing them and not talking about them can exacerbate the danger, because then we would be condemned to repeat the same mistakes. There must be confrontation and at the same time we must confront the systems that perpetuate abuse and prejudice. Only through these actions can progress be built.

—How much of Cate is there in the character of Lydia?

— Lydia’s character made me think a lot about what is allowed and considered acceptable in the pursuit of excellence. I recently spoke with an actress friend about how important Stella Adler, a great acting teacher, was for her career. However, today Stella would be “cancelled” and her methods would be considered excessively brutal. I think that in art a certain brutality is necessary, because if you want to stand out you must have a judge within you, be hard on yourself, have a strong critical sense of what you do. Who cares what others think, it is to their interior that any writer, actor, musician or painter must be accountable, to the point of always demanding more. But this way of generating excellence that we have used for decades no longer works because kindness is now required.

But then what is the price of excellence?

— I do not know. And I don’t think I’m great. Excellence is my mistress, I court her every day, but she is very elusive!

More than a lover, perhaps a companion.

— I hope so. However, excellence is different from success. I know many artists who have not received the recognition they deserve. That is the cruelty and riskiness of my profession. And then the obsession with legacy comes into play, as it does with my character. We see this in the Elon Musks of the world, capable of doing anything in order to leave a mark. There is a great human cost, as well as personal and artistic, in that. But what we leave to those who come after is totally out of our control and it is arrogant to think otherwise. You can only decide what you will leave to your children.

—Is it so difficult to know how to manage success?

—Someone told me at the beginning of my career that success reveals who you are, and I think it’s true because it exposes you a lot. But failure is an exceptional teacher.

— How do you survive failure?

— You can always be reborn, right? As long as you’re strong enough. T.S. Eliot said: “In my end is my beginning.” And there is always a new chapter, which sometimes requires a fall to exist. But humility is needed, another undervalued virtue. That’s why for me the film has an optimistic ending, despite everything. 

— You’re going to Venice to attend the Venice Film Festival, a big event that we hope will encourage people to return to the cinemas.

— It will be great to go to Venice and, of course, I hope that the festival will help to fill the cinemas. It has been and continues to be a difficult time for everyone. One of little leadership and great economic instability. Women are always the first affected, they lose their rights and control over their bodies. This instability amplifies our desire to get together, listen to music, go out. And to go to the movies, where you find stories that also help to delve into yourself, into the person you are. With the pandemic we have had a great collective experience and we must realize that we are all in this together and we have to be humble.

—You speak of humility, but yours is a truly extraordinary life…

— I’ll tell you one thing: this summer there has been an incredible heat wave in Europe and we Australians are obsessed with water and how to conserve it. Five years ago we wanted to buy several large warehouses for our house in England and people thought we were crazy because it always rains here. But there had already been a drought in Sussex and now we are in this heat. Today I have been watering my raspberries at five in the morning using the water from the tank so as not to waste the main one. If we run out of water, no matter who you are or where you are, we are out of it. We are all connected and we have to be humble.

Sources: VF France, VF Italy, VF Spain, French Interview, Italian Interview, Spanish Interview

Documentary Now! and TÁR updates
Posted on
Aug 24, 2022

Documentary Now! and TÁR updates

Hi, Blanchett fans!

Here’s a few updates on Documentary Now! and TÁR.

Documentary Now

TIFF (Toronto International Film Festival) has released their schedule. Documentary Now! premieres on September 10th at 9:15pm. Watch the trailer below.

Three new episodes from season four of the mockumentary series Documentary Now! — created by SNL alumni Bill Hader, Seth Meyers, Fred Armisen, and Rhys Thomas — receive their World Premiere.

In this world premiere, TIFF audiences will be the first to see three episodes from the upcoming season of Documentary Now! First up is a take on My Octopus Teacher, only this version stars English comedian Jamie Demetriou (Fleabag) as an animal-obsessed filmmaker in the episode titled “My Monkey Grifter.” Second is a warm-hearted homage to Agnès Varda, starring French actor Liliane Rovère (Call My Agent) portraying an aging director trying to recapture the thrills of her youth in “Trouver Frisson.” Third is a pet project of Cate Blanchett, who fell in love with the 1990s BBC documentary Three Salons at the Seaside, which she and co-star Harriet Walter fondly lampoon in “Two Hairdressers at Bagglyport,” about a beauty parlour full of secrets (that simultaneously evokes the Anna Wintour/Vogue doc The September Issue).

— Thom Powers, TIFF Docs Programmer

Documentary Now! TIFF Schedule. Click image to book tickets. Tickets go on sale for public on September 5th

TIFF Trailer

TÁR

According to La Biennale, press conference begins approximately at 11AM CEST. There will be two films in competition on September 1st, TÁR being the first to premiere. Todd Field has also released a director’s statement on La Biennale’s website about TÁR.

This script was written for one artist, Cate Blanchett. Had she said no, the film would have never seen the light of day. Filmgoers, amateur and otherwise, will not be surprised by this. After all, she is a master supreme.

Even so, while we were making the picture, the superhuman-skill and verisimilitude of Cate was something truly astounding to behold. She raised all boats. The privilege of collaborating with an artist of this caliber is something impossible to adequately describe.
In every possible way this is Cate’s film.

Source: TIFF, La Biennale

Lip Maestro Shade 214 & Oggi Magazine Scans
Posted on
Aug 21, 2022

Lip Maestro Shade 214 & Oggi Magazine Scans

Hi, Blanchetters!

Another video from Armani Beauty for their LIP MAESTRO Campaign has been released, this time Cate Blanchett wears shade 214 of the lipstick. We also have magazine scans from Oggi No. 34 issue.

A full length trailer for TÁR was recently rated and the length of the trailer is 2 minutes and 25 seconds. It will likely be released this week or the week after which coincides with the world premiere of the movie at Venice Film Festival.

Lip Maestro

LIP MAESTRO Shade 214

Magazine Scans

Below is a part of the magazine article that is a google translated version from Italian to English. Original text can be found on the scans.

CATE THE WOMAN WHO LOVES WOMEN

At the Venice Film Festival, Blanchett will play Lydia Tár, a conductor who falls in love with two musicians. For other performances as a lesbian she has become a gay icon. But she says: “I also played an elf, yet I’m not immortal”.

Ferragamo shoes, tailor-made suits, scarf, Van Cleef & Arpels jewels, vintage handbag on the arm, chic, unresolved and courageous, yet also revolutionary: Cate Blanchett in Carol is a bourgeois close to divorce who falls in love with a saleslady, aspiring photographer, Therese, in the 50s. No wonder that they are waiting for her at the Venice Film Festival (31 August – 10 September): critics and cinephiles and the LGBTQ + community – all of them curious and anxious for her new film Tár, in competition at #Venezia79. Blanchett is Lydia Tár, one of the greatest conductors in the world and certainly the greatest in Germany. The environment is competitive and male chauvinistic. She must always prove that she is good, that she is up to the role, that she really knows the music. Plus she falls in love with two musicians. The trailer, recently posted on the web, does not speak of all this. On the contrary, it speaks of a pandemic, of bees, of the challenges that await us. There is no life of Lydia Tár who in the trailer dresses simple, in light green and appears unadorned, the opposite of Carol, with her wavy hairstyle. Biennale Cinema keep their mouths sewn together, but there is certainly this – that Blanchett will be very good in this new role of hers with (also) a homosexual theme.

Blanchett has been a gay icon since Carol’s day, very proud of it. When she posed with Nicole Kidman in a jacket and boyish pants in 2019, the web appreciated it a lot, they had butterflies in their stomachs, loving what is called her “lesbian aesthetics”. In a video from 2020, Blanchett jokingly said aloud: “I’m a lesbian.”. It happened during Instagram live with Sarah Paulson, a pansexual, star of American Horror Story, and co-star in Mrs America. Moreover, speaking of Mrs America (which tells the story of the US feminist movement), Blanchett has remained a gay icon, although in the series she plays the ultraconservative, Phyllis Schlafly, married for 44 years to the same man and mother of six children. Practically it is the only point of contact between the two. Blanchett has been married since 1997 (25 years of marriage) to playwright Andrew Upton, a bearded gentleman who looks like everyone’s neighbor, they have four children and live at Highwell House. They also have a wing dedicated to their art collection. One of the many times she was asked about her marriage, she replied: “With my husband I won the lottery and consequently with my family.”

Oggi No. 34 – August 25th 2022
Source: Alberta Film Ratings

TÁR Premiere on September 1st #Venezia79
Posted on
Aug 16, 2022

TÁR Premiere on September 1st #Venezia79

Ciao!

Biennale Cinema has released the full schedule for this year’s film festival. TÁR will have two public screenings on September 1st — at 17:15 (Sala Grande), which marks its world premiere, and 19:00 (Palabiennale). Earliest screening is on August 31st for press and industry members only. The ticket will go on sale at 15:00 (Venice time), August 17th. You can go here to book tickets and you can check the screening schedule below.

The movie is also competing for Queer Lion’s 16th Edition. The Queer Lion Award was created as a collateral prize for the “Best Film with Homosexual & Queer Culture Contents”. Here’s an updated synopsis of the movie:

Lydia Tár is an acclaimed composer who rose to become the first female chief conductor of a German orchestra. We follow Tár during her daily life living in Berlin, leading up to the recording of her latest symphony, while her sentimental life (including a complicated tormented affair with a female cellist) clashes with and threatens her burning ambitions. Tár’s adopted daughter, the exeptionally brilliant six-year-old Petra, will turn out to be the rock Lydia needs, when everything in her life seems to start going wrong.

Screening Schedule

Public Screening

 

Press-Industry Screening

UK/Australia Season

Cate has sent another short message as ambassador of UK/AU Season.

 

Source: Biennale Cinema, Queer Lion

 

TÁR at 60th New York Film Festival
Posted on
Aug 9, 2022

TÁR at 60th New York Film Festival

Hello, everyone!

TÁR has been selected as part of the main slate lineup of the 60th New York Film Festival. The festival which is presented by Film at Lincoln Center runs from September 30th through October 16th 2022. It will take place at Lincoln Center and other venues across New York City.

The charisma and emotional precision of Cate Blanchett are put to astounding use in this deft showcase for the actor’s nearly musical artistry, a stinging portrait of a world-famous orchestra conductor’s gradual unraveling that is the first film in sixteen years from director Todd Field (In the Bedroom, Little Children).

Click image for higher resolution

It was previously announced that the movie is also part of the main competition lineup at 79th Venice Film Festival. And while there is no official announcement yet from Telluride Film Festival, Alberto Barbera, who is the artistic director at Venice Film Festival, has mentioned on an interview that TÁR is also going to that festival.

Source: NYFF

TÁR Teaser
Posted on
Jul 26, 2022

TÁR Teaser

Ciao!

We finally have a teaser for TÁR which is set to premiere at the 79th Venice Film Festival (running from August 31st-September 10th) and will be released in the US on October 7th 2022 and in the UK on January 20th 2023. The film has been selected as part of the main competition category of the festival. The other cast in the film are Noémie Merlant, Nina Hoss, Sophie Kauer, Julian Glover, Allan Corduner, and Mark Strong. The films has a running time of 158 minutes. You can watch the enigmatic teaser below.

TÁR to go to Venice & The School for Good and Evil Release Date
Posted on
Jul 22, 2022

TÁR to go to Venice & The School for Good and Evil Release Date

Happy Friday!

Some great news today, our most anticipated Cate movie this year – TÁR, will have it’s world premiere at the 79th Venice Film Festival. You can also follow the movie’s official social media accounts below. The School for Good and Evil where Cate is the narrator will drop on Netflix on October 21st 2022.

Cate Blanchett Set to Bring New Movies to Venice

Focus Features will be on the Lido with Todd Field’s “Tár,” which teams the “In the Bedroom” director with Cate Blanchett as the fictional Lydia Tár, one of the world’s greatest conductors and the first female conductor of a major German orchestra. Blanchett is a Venice regular who presided over the festival’s main jury in 2020.

Full line up of movies premiering at this year’s festival will be unveiled on July 26th with screening schedule to be released at the middle of August. The festival will run from August 31st to September 10th 2022.

You can followmovie for updates on both instagram and twitter.

Click image to follow

The School for Good and Evil

 

77th Venice Film Festival: Additional Photos and Video Links
Posted on
Sep 15, 2020

77th Venice Film Festival: Additional Photos and Video Links

Hello, Blanchetters! Hope you’re all having great day/evening.

This is quite a lengthy post but we have added hundreds of photos on our gallery from Day 0-11 of 77th Venice Film Festival. We’ve also added social media posts with Cate and links from where you can watch her red carpet appearances, jury press conference, opening and closing ceremony. Enjoy!

 

Jury Press Conference starts at 1:13:00

 

Cate arrives at the red carpet at 30:40; opening ceremony starts at 58:20

 

Cate arrived at 45:00

 

Cate arrived at 46:00

 

Closing Ceremony started at 2:45

 

Main Competition Jury Press Conference started at 2:58:00