New Armani Beauty Campaign and Harper’s Bazaar Magazine Scan
Posted on
May 4, 2022

New Armani Beauty Campaign and Harper’s Bazaar Magazine Scan

Good day, everyone!

Armani Beauty has launched their new campaign for their lipsticks line — Lip Maestro. Check out the ad and promotional photo they released with Cate, who is Giorgio Armani’s Global Beauty Ambassador. There is also a short article from Harper’s Bazaar España with an interview conducted during 2022 Goya Awards.

Armani Beauty – Lip Maestro Campaign

Armani Beauty Lip Maestro – Photoshoot and Campaign Ads

 

Harper’s Bazaar España – May 2022

Cate Blanchett: “I want to spend more time being myself”
Posted on
Mar 13, 2022

Cate Blanchett: “I want to spend more time being myself”

Happy Sunday, everyone!

A new interview with Cate has been released. This is a Google translated interview from Spanish to English.

Cate Blanchett: “I spend most of my time being someone else. I want to spend more time being myself.”

Other than her two Oscars, Cate has added in recent weeks from Europe the first International Goya and a César for her entire career. Actress, producer, and farmer, the versatile Australian performer, also an ambassador for Armani fragrances, she confesses that with age she feels more limitations when it comes to acting. She laments that she is sometimes still the only woman on a shoot and she fears that the platforms will become monopolies.

Cate Blanchett (Melbourne, 52 years old) thinks there are too many awards. And she knows what she’s talking about. Because she has almost all of them: two Oscars, three Baftas, three Golden Globes and three from the Screen Actors Guild. As if they weren’t enough, she has now embarked on the conquest of Europe. She has just received an Honorary César in Paris and a month ago she picked up the International Goya from Pedro Almodóvar, with whom she is going to shoot the first film in English by the Spanish director, A Manual for Cleaning Women. She welcomes us in Valencia, hours before hugging him and thanking him for a recognition that serves to strengthen ties with the Latin film industry. She wears trainers and a metallic pink suit by Giorgio Armani, the firm whose line of fragrances is an ambassador. Under the jacket, the skin, and around her neck, several golden chains with padlocks and snake heads that she plays with as she speaks. After premiering Nightmare Alley last February under the direction of Guillermo del Toro and dazzling the world with her false teeth in Don’t Look Up, she says she wants to spend more time playing herself. Normal: the character is exciting.

In an interview Julia Roberts did for Interview Magazine, you said that as you gets older, you find acting more and more humiliating.

It gets more difficult. Why? I think that when you work in the artistic field — also if you are, for example, a writer—, this field becomes more and more entangled in your life. I spend most of my time being someone else, and I think I want to spend more time being myself. Also, as an actor you are very exposed. I do not know how to explain it. Six years ago [photographer and artist] Cindy Sherman started using digital effects to create her works [in which she often appears]. And people threw their hands in their heads because she had always used prosthetics and had worked her body as if it were a malleable object. She simply explained that she had reached an age where she was less malleable. And that she had to resort to digital technology to maintain the same skill.

Is it the same as an actor?

You feel a bit the same, that your palette is getting smaller and smaller. But the truth is that I am not very interested in digital advances. What I like are magic tricks, I still scream when someone does one in front of me. Because with magic you become an accomplice: you know you are being deceived, but in the digital universe you don’t know what is real and what isn’t. It’s like when you see Gary Oldman without prosthetics or digital treatment, the interpretation of him is something that he builds from the inside and you believe it. He is really inspiring. I’ve worked with digital retouching on The Curious Case of Benjamin Button and, yes, it can be liberating, but in the end, as you get older, you face more and more of your limitations, and that’s humbling.

Is the film industry easier for women now than when you started?

If we keep talking about it, the problem still exists. But we have to keep talking and working on it until it is no longer a topic of conversation. Sometimes I keep walking on set and there are 30 men and I’m the only woman, and I think, “This is so out of sync with what’s going on in society. How is it possible for us to connect with the audience like this?” When you’re in a predominantly male or white work environment, it feels old-fashioned and you feel like it’s also starting to be irrelevant. I think there has been a big change. But you have to stand firm and understand that changes are very fragile, as is democracy. So you have to persevere.

You were artistic director of the Sydney Theater Company. Has that experience influenced your way of understanding her work as an actress?

We were not only artistic directors [and her husband, screenwriter and playwright Andrew Upton], but also CEO, so we were responsible for the financial and creative health of the company. And many times these two aspects are conceived as mutually exclusive. But they don’t have to be: throughout my career I’ve worked with producers who are amazing at keeping finances in order while also helping with creative decisions.

Is that producer profile in danger of extinction?

Yes, unfortunately, because it is something I aspire to. It’s not all about being in front of the camera. I don’t feel obligated. No longer. I’ve already done it. I’ve bored the audience enough already. I do not need it. No more.

Throughout your career you have played everything from action characters to femme fatales, through comedic roles or even men, such as Bob Dylan. How do you choose your characters? Is there any kind of woman you would never play?

Many decisions are based on instinct and timing. I have a wonderful and great life, with a lot of commitments and things that interest me, starting with my farm, with my sheep, my pigs, my cows, and with my children, of course. So sometimes not all projects fit into my schedule. But nothing happens. There is no need to bleed for it. You have to let them go. It’s one of the best things the film industry has taught me.

The fact that?

You make a film and you let it go because after your work comes post-production work and finally, if you’re lucky, it reaches the public. And by that time you will have already done one or two other things. And that film happens to become a kind of second cousin. And then, hopefully, you can see it again with fresh eyes and appreciate it.

What do you expect now from A Manual for Cleaning Women, your project with Almodóvar?

We had talked many times about working together, but it was never the right time. He is a man of incredible taste and insight. He is very precise and, like his films, very free. We are very aligned and excited about the project. I love it because he works with his heart and with his hands. And with his head, of course. He is a person very connected with what happens in the world, but at the same time someone who follows his own path. So I think this project will be unique. His work has a clearly Spanish framework, but it has always transcended and has been recognized internationally because it connects very well with American concerns: the family, being outside the majority culture, being an outcast. I think it’s going to be a fascinating journey in search of that hybrid between the American and the Latin experience.

You have a master’s degree in that Latino perspective. You have worked with Alejandro Cuarón, Guillermo del Toro and now Almodóvar. Is there something that differentiates Latino directors from the rest?

They all have incredible hearts and a certain brutality, but not in the bad sense of the word. I mean they don’t run away from things that others prefer not to name. And they are profoundly plastic artists. His intellectual pursuits are very sumptuous to digest visually. Latino and Australian directors have a very special, unique vision of the world, and that is why they have more and more weight in the US film industry.

I said before that Almodóvar was a very precise director. Is he the kind of director you like to work with, someone who gives a lot of directions and controls every detail?

I think the project is what dictates how you have to work. For me, the perfect thing is to have a clear line of communication with the director based on trust, because there are moments in the shoot when you have to say that something is rubbish, and you have to know that it comes and is said from respect. Rehearsals and filming are not always friendly. They are not disrespectful, but sometimes you have to fight a thing to the bottom and it’s not comfortable.

Woody Allen even told you on the first day of shooting Blue Jasmine that the take was horrible, and so were you.

But in the end I realized that the location was wrong, the camera was wrong… so we changed everything. And then the scene was cut, it was never in the final footage. You can’t take it personally, you have to listen to it and think that it’s teamwork, that sometimes a director can say something challenging but it doesn’t necessarily have to be about you, but about the product.

How do you feel that the film and fiction industry has changed in recent years with the emergence of platforms and the rise of series? Are you interested in that new channel?

Well, I did Mrs. America (Hulu) with a group of fabulous women. And there are a couple of projects in development that look very good. But in the end, what interests me are really lasting experiences, although only time can tell which ones will be. On the one hand, streaming platforms represent a wonderful opportunity for the audience and also for a lot of people in the industry who have stayed afloat for these two years thanks to them. But this model cannot go forward without being examined.

What is the perceived risk?

It is necessary to analyze the potential monopolies that are emerging from this format, and that are not good for anyone. They are not good creatively and neither for the public. And, of course, they have never been good for the industry. We do not want to replicate the old studio system in a more radical and irrevocable way. I am worried about this. Very worried.

Do you think this system of monopolies is accelerating?

Yes, and I think the public can perceive it. Because everything looks alike. The offer is uniform. There is nothing special anymore. However, going to the movies is still an event.

But after the pandemic, due to fear or routine, cinemas continue to lose viewers, at least that is what is happening in Spain.

Yes, and also in the United States there are a lot of small theaters that have been acquired by the platforms to project their content. But there are still places like a small theater in Pittsburgh called Row House and that has only 50 seats where retrospectives of Tarkovsky, of Wes Anderson are shown… I am confident in that differential value that the cinema can continue to offer and that people appreciate you can still be interested.

The pandemic has changed our consumption patterns, but also other industry tools such as awards and red carpets. Do they still make sense?

I think there are too many prizes. They all look the same and people are tired. But this was already happening before the pandemic. So I think we have to be critical. We have a very good opportunity to change things: to ask ourselves what we want to do, what we want it to look like and, above all, if bigger is always synonymous with better. And I’m not just talking about red carpets, but events in general. We don’t want to go back to that old narrative. I personally don’t want to go back to the good old days because I think they weren’t really that good.

But in the end the old physical events have their magic. Even Giorgio Armani, the first designer to suspend a show due to COVID, has returned to the physical catwalk with guests.

It is a live event. That is why the performing arts are so special. When you walk into a room and you can see the fabrics, hear the music, you are there. You remember. But I think the key is the same in fashion as it is in film. Mr. Armani is always aware of every detail. Even at his age, he is a tireless worker and his control over the quality of the products is incredible. He thinks the more you do, the less special he is. And this happens in all industries, including the film industry.

Source: EL PAÍS

Cate Blanchett at Goya Awards 2022 – Photos & Videos; and New Podcast
Posted on
Feb 13, 2022

Cate Blanchett at Goya Awards 2022 – Photos & Videos; and New Podcast

Hola, Cate Blanchett fans! What a weekend we have!

The new episode, with Cate, of Talk Easy with Sam Fragoso has been released. You can listen below. Cate has been presented with the inaugural International Goya Award last night in Valencia, Spain. Pedro Almodóvar and Penélope Cruz presented the award. Check out the photos and videos from yesterday.

A Tea with Cate Blanchett

Goya Awards Ceremony

36th Goya Awards – Stage – February 12th 2022

https://twitter.com/AgustinAlmo/status/1492617527687528448

Photocall and Press Conference

Photocall

 Press Con

The text below is google translated but the source is linked at the end of this post.

Cate Blanchett, “speechless” for receiving the first International Goya

With a sweet “Hello!”, the actress Cate Blanchett has conquered the press that was waiting for her in the hall of the Palau de les Arts de València. Many of them welcomed her to the city that hosts, for the first time, the Goya ceremony.

She, on the other hand, “does not need introductions”, as Mariano Barroso, director of the Film Academy, has pointed out, who has accompanied her in the pose before the incessant shooting of the photographers. Then she, alone, elegantly, she has smiled at everyone dressed in a pink suit jacket and sneakers, before explaining that “I was speechless when they called me to tell me that they gave me the award.”

Cate Blanchett: “The Academy Award means that what I do has reached a different culture and audience”

It had raised maximum expectation and did not disappoint. Cate Blanchett starred this Saturday in a massive meeting with the media a few hours before receiving at the Palau de les Arts in Valencia the International Goya Award created this year by the Film Academy to “recognize personalities who contribute to cinema as an art that unites cultures and viewers of all the world”. In her case, she is also awarded for being “an actress who has played unforgettable characters that are already part of our memory and our present.” The Australian actress and producer was satisfied and excited, and she thanked the Film Academy for this recognition, which represents support for her career. “I come from Australia, where we have a small but quite powerful film industry, and being in Valencia receiving an award from the Spanish Academy means a lot to me,

In a room packed with journalists, cameras and photographers, the president of the Film Academy, Mariano Barroso , opened the event by welcoming Cate Blanchett, who was very grateful for the award. “When they called me to tell me that they were going to give me the International Goya, I was speechless, because Spanish cinema has had a fundamental influence on me, not only because of the work of Almodóvar and Amenábar, but also because of all cinema spoken in Spanish” he explained.

Winner of two Oscars, for Best Leading Actress for Woody Allen ‘s Blue Jasmine , and Best Supporting Actress for Martin Scorsese ‘s The Aviator. .In addition to three Golden Globes, three BAFTAs and three Screen Actors Guild Awards, Blanchett is one of the greatest talents in world cinema today. Some awards that represent recognition of his professional career. “I am old enough to say that I have a career, and I hope that it will continue to advance and take me in multiple directions. The creative path is full of deviations, it is not a straight line. If one decides to make applause the objective of the experience and ignore what work is, one is making a mistake. When you make a movie, a play, a book, how the audience is going to receive it is completely out of your control.”

Project with Almodovar

The actor spoke with enthusiasm about her upcoming projects, among which is Manual for cleaning women , by Pedro Almodóvar, an adaptation of the book by Lucía Berlín produced by El Deseo and Dirty Films, a company of which she is the founder and director together with Andrew Upton(with whom he chaired and artistically directed the Sydney Theater Company from 2008 to 2014. He had words of praise and admiration for the director from La Mancha. “I have known him for 20 years and we have been talking about working together for a long time. Now we have found a project that excites us both. There was another that did not materialize because it was not the right time, but now it is, “he revealed, adding that making this adaptation “means working with a person and a film culture that I love. It has always interested me and allows me to enter Pedro’s universe”.

This will be Almodóvar’s first film in English. “The key to working with him is that he is an excellent writer, an artist. All his cinema, everything he has created has a brutal influence. The script that he has proposed to me is unique, I had not seen something like it. Lucia Berlin’s stories can be represented cinematographically in very different ways, but Pedro’s point of view makes us go further, that we delve into concepts that have to do with addiction at different levels. We are going to talk about addictive relationships, but also about substance addiction, ”she recounted enthusiastically.

In addition, Blanchett currently has Nightmare Alley by Guillermo del Toro which she said “generates a great story behind each character that helps you a lot.”

Academies and festivals

Blanchett highlighted the important role of film academies and festivals today. “They have much more than nominees, red carpet and awards. There is work to support the industry and they are mentors in a process that has to look at the present and the future without fear. We find social movements such as Black Lives Matter or MeToo that must be understood and included. That inclusivity has to be adapted at all levels. If an academy does not understand these concepts and does not look to the future, it ends up being irrelevant, ”she said bluntly.

She also referenced the damage the pandemic has done to culture. “We have all missed going to a movie theater and all these types of cultural events that allow us to share experiences with complete strangers. We have missed it in the cinema, but in the theater even more”, she assured, although she acknowledged that the cinema was already “in danger” before the virus spread. “I had the hope, which I still do, that once we go out on the street we would really want to meet and we would do it in a movie theater. I don’t lose it.” But “we must be aware of what has happened: for 18 months we have been consuming on platforms,” she said, after considering that “the works should be seen as they have been planned. When we talk about creativity we talk about great ideas. The size of the screens doesn’t matter if the ideas are big”. The Australian actress and producer is currently involved in the pre-production of the series Disclaimer, directed by Alfonso Cuarón for AppleTV+, in which she will star and executive produce, and has just wrapped filming on Todd Field ‘s TAR , which she also produces and stars in, and Guillermo del Toro’s version of Pinocchio , for Netflix.

Arrival and red carpet

Source: La Vanguardia, Premios Goya

Cate Blanchett at Goya Awards 2022
Posted on
Feb 11, 2022

Cate Blanchett at Goya Awards 2022

Hi, everyone!

As you all know Cate will be receiving the first International Goya Award tomorrow, February 12th, in Valencia, Spain — in the morning there will be a press conference with Cate. Check the details below.

Press Conference — 11:45AM Spain (CET); 5:45AM (ET)
Red Carpet — 7:30PM (CET); 1:30PM (ET)
Ceremony — 10PM (CET); 4PM (ET) 

Press Conference

The brightest of the stars – with the permission, perhaps, of Javier Bardem and Penélope Cruz – who will step on the Les Arts carpet tonight will be the Australian actress Cate Blanchett, who will receive the first International Goya awarded by the Academy in Valencia. During the morning she will be able to see the place where the gala will be held since she will hold a meeting with the media.

At the end of the press conference, Blanchett may want to attend one of the events organized by the Valencia City Council prior to the gala. “We already have the Goya gala here and we wanted it to be an open celebration in the city, a social celebration,” Deputy Mayor Sandra Gómez proclaimed yesterday. The socialist spokeswoman, by the way, will act as the highest municipal representative since the mayor Joan Ribó continues to be isolated in his house due to the coronavirus.

 

 

Red Carpet

Ceremony

At 10PM (CET), the gala begins live on La 1, TVE Internacional, RNE and RTVE.es. from the Palau de Les Arts in Valencia, a television show with musical performances, humor, and which will be a tribute to Luis García Berlanga. The ceremony is broadcast in sign language and the photocall of the winners can also be followed with the first reactions.

Click HERE for ceremony.

Source: Levante, RTVE

Cate Blanchett is to receive the first International Goya Award
Posted on
Feb 4, 2022

Cate Blanchett is to receive the first International Goya Award

Hello, blanchetters!

Cate will be honored with the first International Goya Awards from the Academy of Cinematographic Arts and Sciences of Spain. The ceremony is on February 12th and will be broadcasted by Televisión Española (TVE). According to EL PAÍS, she “will go to collect the award at the gala on February 12 in Valencia”.

Cate Blanchett will receive the first International Goya

The Academy has created this new recognition for “personalities who contribute to cinema as an art that unites cultures and viewers around the world.”

The first International Goya will be awarded to Cate Blanchett for “being an extraordinary figure in world cinema” and “an actress who has played unforgettable characters that are already part of our memory and our present.”

Cate Blanchett will receive the International Goya Award, an award created by the Film Academy to “recognize personalities who contribute to cinema as an art that unites cultures and viewers from around the world.” Instituted for world cinema figures, in its first edition it has gone to the Australian performer and producer for being “an actress who has played unforgettable characters who are already part of our memory and our present.”

Blanchett is a professional recognized throughout the world: actress, producer, artistic director and humanist. She is a goodwill ambassador for the UN refugee agency, as well as a member of the Australian Conservation Foundation. He is also a figure committed to the Australian Wildlife Conservancy and has received the Crystal Award at the World Economic Forum in Davos for his work for UNHCR. In 2012, Blanchett was invested as a Knight of Arts and Letters by the French Ministry of Culture. He has presided over the Cannes Festival (2018) and Venice (2020). He has received Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of New South Wales, the University of Sydney and Macquarie University, as well as being a Companion of the Order of Australia for his continued commitment to nature and social equality.

Currently, the actress is embarking on the pre-production of the series Disclaimer , directed by Alfonso Cuarón for Apple Plus, in which she will star and of which she will be the executive producer. She has just finished filming TAR , by Todd Field –which she also produces and stars in– and Guillermo del Toro ‘s version of Pinocchio , for Netflix. She currently has The Alley of Lost Souls , also from Del Toro (Searchlights Pictures), in addition to the film Don’t Look Up , by Adam McKay , which can be seen on Netflix.

She will be the protagonist of Manual for cleaning women , by Pedro Almodóvar , an adaptation of Lucia Berlin ‘s book produced by the actress’s company, El Deseo and Dirty Films, a company of which she is the founder and director together with Andrew Upton (with who chaired and artistically directed the Sydney Theater Company from 2008 to 2014).

With two Oscars – for Best Leading Actress for Blue Jasmine , by Woody Allen, and for Best Supporting Actress for The Aviator , by Martin Scorsese–; three Golden Globes; three BAFTAs; and three Screen Actors Guild Awards, the actress is one of the most sought-after talents in the industry and respected and loved by movie lovers around the world.

Blanchett, who as an unknown played Queen Elizabeth , a role that brought her her first Golden Globe and made her internationally known, has been the queen of the elves in The Lord of the Rings trilogy and Bob Dylan in I’m Not There . Carol ‘s leading lady  participated in the fourth installment of Indiana Jones and has worked with Anthony Minghella ( The Talented Mr. Ripley ), Sally Potter ( Furtive Lives ), Steven Soderbergh ( The Good German ), Jim Jarmusch ( Coffee and Cigarrettes ),Wes Anderson ( Life Aquatic ), Ridley Scott ( Robin Hood ) and Richard Linklater ( Where Are You Bernadette ), among many other filmmakers.

Source: Goya, EL PAÍS

Cate Blanchett talks Nightmare Alley and A Manual for Cleaning Women
Posted on
Jan 23, 2022

Cate Blanchett talks Nightmare Alley and A Manual for Cleaning Women

Happy Sunday!

El Pais published a new interview they did with Cate ahead of the release of Nightmare Alley in Spain on January 28th. Here’s a google translated interview.

The actress premieres ‘Nightmare Alley’, by Guillermo del Toro, while leading the pre-production of ‘A Manual for Cleaning Women’, by Almodóvar. “I want to enjoy Pedro’s passion,” she says.

The deep, unique voice of Cate Blanchett (Melbourne, 52 years old), resounds on the other end of the phone: “What if I am Pedro Almodóvar’s new boss? Noooo [laughter]. We are fellow adventurers, I don’t believe in hierarchical structures”. The actress is promoting Nightmare Alley, by Guillermo del Toro, but A Manual for Cleaning Women appears on the horizon , the 43 stories of Lucia Berlin, who died in 2004, which Almodóvar has written script. For four years, the Spaniard has been working on the project. But before the doubt of whether it would go ahead or not, in his production company, El Deseo, they did not renew the adaptation rights. To the rescue of the film appeared Blanchett, its possible protagonist, who is passionate about the script, and who therefore bought the rights. Now, her production company, Dirty Films, is leading a work that will feature that script and be directed by Almodóvar and will be filmed in 2023. “We are collaborators, something I look for in my films. I had been wanting to work with Pedro for a long time, enjoy his passion”, she says.

About her character, she explains: “It’s fascinating how Berlin explored herself from many different perspectives: love, addictions, the creative process… All the women in the stories are, deep down, herself. And that Pedro has grasped, because he knows what the primary mechanisms of relationships between human beings are like. In his films there is heart and at the same time a profound reflection on aesthetics”.

Blanchett finds a quick connection between Almodóvar and del Toro: “Both are deeply humanistic filmmakers. You can see it in Parallel Mothers, in its final interweaving between History and the deepest human feelings. He loves people.” And she explains that next week they will meet again: “On Wednesday I will present a screening of her film in London and Pedro and Penélope Cruz will be there. There is no plan that I want more”. It is a pass for members of the Hollywood Academy, since until February 1 they can vote for the Oscar nominations, and it coincides with the premiere, on Friday the 28th, of Parallel Mothers in the United Kingdom.

The excuse for the interview, held last Tuesday, is her work in Nightmare Alley, in which she plays a psychiatrist, Lilith Ritter, without any scruples to swindle people and who will find in the protagonist – who is brought to life by Bradley Cooper—, a trickster hardened in local fairs who now acts for rich people, his best possible ally. A femme fatale manual. “Well, it is that usually in film noir there are. And her wardrobe and her office provide many common elements of these women. But I also think that part of that type of character is made up of their body, and here that beautiful body is provided by Bradley. Guillermo has shunned the traditional image and planted elements of corruption and perdition for all the characters.” Is it a movie without monsters, unlike almost all of Del Toro’s previous films? “Ugh, the no monster thing is indeed moot, because some of the characters are demeaned in ways that you might think they are. The promises of power and money push them into an amorality that is as frightening as the monsters. Those behaviors are also terrifying.”

Production on Nightmare Alley was halted for six months during the lockdown, time Blanchett spent gardening. “It was frustrating for all of us, because we had very little left to finish, but at the same time it helped us reflect on what we had filmed.” For the actress, there is no one comparable to the Mexican director. “It’s unique. Not only is he a great lover of film history, as is obvious, but he is also fascinated by acting, production design, photography. He is constantly creating and is an artist who drives those of us who work to be better.” And that is why she will also be with him in Pinocchio, an animation project that will finally be released in September, produced by Netflix. An hour after this interview, Del Toro himself explained to EL PAÍS: “I know that I always say that the monsters that scare me the most are human beings. But Cate, no [laughs]. Our relationship has been explosive and joyful. It has been like discovering a friend who was already a friend before I met him. Years ago we developed a television series that was never shot and I was captivated by its humor and depth. Now my challenge is how to write roles for Cate in my future films.”

Blanchett has launched numerous messages in favor of movie theaters in recent years. When in September 2020 she attended the Venice festival, as president of its jury, he pointed out: “We have to go back to the theaters. We are coming out of a streaming monoculture that has lasted six months. This is the opportunity to re-examine how this technology changes the way of seeing and making cinema”. Now she explains, after being part of the success of Netflix Don’t Look Up: “I am passionate about getting involved in fascinating stories that force me to take risks. And in this case, I loved joining the world of Adam McKay, I’ve been in that project for years, before Netflix came on. Adam’s way of telling it in a documentary style is shocking… Because we actually live in a world where populism rules, where arguments are not listened to.” Due to these interests, she jumped from the cinema to the theater and although she has directed on stage, she does not think he will soon do it for the big screen: “I have always been interested, but you need a lot of patience and time. I have a couple of ideas, and at the same time four children. Too much hassle for now.”

On the element that unites both films, Don’t Look Up and Nightmare Alley, which reflect on what is true or false and the triumph of fake news, she points out: “The global level of distrust and fear is incredible. I am still amazed at the widespread corruption that we have accepted. We should reflect more on it and that is why it is pertinent to make these types of films, to debate about it”. Do those who best manipulate the rest of human beings win? “It infuriates me to see where the world is going because of this constructed fear, created by some.”

Source: El Pais

Cate Blanchett podcast interviews; & conversation with Bradley Cooper
Posted on
Jan 21, 2022

Cate Blanchett podcast interviews; & conversation with Bradley Cooper

Happy Friday, blanchetters!

We continue to get awesome interviews with Cate as part of promotion for Nightmare Alley. Searchlight Pictures released new interview with Cate and Bradley Cooper. She also talked about Don’t Look Up and her upcoming projects. Sirius XM uploaded another short video which was part of the podcast interview with them. Listen to the podcast interviews below. Beware of spoilers, especially at the second half of the conversation with Bradley Cooper!

Cate Blanchett on playing a murderous psychoanalyst in Nightmare Alley

‘It’s about unlocking the human monster’: The actor discusses her role in Guillermo del Toro’s new film noir, which takes us into the bizarre world of carnivals

Guillermo del Toro is known for his grotesque creations. In Pan’s Labyrinth, the Mexican director dreamed up a child-eating demon with eyes in its palms; in Cronos, a vampire licks blood off a public bathroom’s floor. For his 11th feature, Nightmare Alley, his first without fantastical elements, del Toro deploys the noir genre to showcase a new type of monster: Cate Blanchett as a psychoanalyst with a murderous edge.

Mixing fraud with Freud, Lilith Ritter (Blanchett) upends the 1940s-set thriller on its painterly head. For the first hour, Stan (Bradley Cooper) toils at a carnival before fleeing with a romantic partner, Molly (Rooney Mara). He then moonlights as a mentalist, faking an ability to read wealthy minds – except Lilith can out-scheme a schemer. In 1999, Blanchett depicted a naïve socialite who’s duped in The Talented Mr Ripley; two decades later, Lilith may as well be renamed The Talented Ms Ritter.

“Guillermo, more than any other director, is fascinated by monsters,” Blanchett, 52, tells me over the phone from London in mid-January. “But in this one, it’s about unlocking the human monster. There’s a dark, monstrous creature inside Bradley that he’s in absolute denial of. My character encourages him to face that monster. It’s a dance of death. She knows that one of them’s going to be destroyed by it.”

Del Toro is the second director to adapt William Lindsay Gresham’s 1946 novel for the screen. In the book, Gresham wrote that Lilith bears “the smile of a well-fed kitten” and laughs with “the bark of a fox”; in del Toro’s screenplay, which he penned with Kim Morgan, Lilith is “an icy woman of indeterminate age”. Helen Walker’s interpretation in the 1947 movie is more of a fake friend – a nightmare ally, if you will.

“Hopefully Lilith is an enigma,” Blanchett says. “Someone who’s completely unknowable. Anyone who’s been in psychoanalysis is desperately trying to unlock the recesses of their therapist’s mind. It’s a magnetic pull, because they seem to be like the Sphinx – they hold the answer to all the riddles they ask you. But in the end, they hold a mirror up to yourself.”

In a jagged, microphone-rigged office decorated like an image from a captcha test, Lilith welcomes Stan into her lair. As she treats numerous upper-class patients, Lilith provides Stan with their deepest, most sordid secrets, enabling him to continue his con; often these exchanges unfold in whispers, both leaning in for a kiss but settling for a flirtatious, breathy conversation that, coincidentally, propels the story along. At circuses, a geek – a performer who bites live chickens – is typically an alcoholic in need of booze; here, the psychoanalyst drip-feeds Stan with sex and romance, knowing he’ll do anything if the affection suddenly evaporates.

Then again, Lilith feeds off Stan, too, because everyone in Nightmare Alley self-medicates. It could be opium, it could be love. “Or maybe it’s acting!” Blanchett interjects. “The set was incredibly claustrophobic. I didn’t leave that office for four weeks. It’s like I was in the Amber Room, buried three storeys underground. Apart from the Copacabana, you never see her outside, whereas Stanley’s out in the world. He’s an instrument. A blunt instrument, unfortunately. She’s hoping he’s a Stradivarius, but it turns out he’s just an Okie with straight teeth.”

Blanchett is both a modern A-lister – her recent credits include a Leo DiCaprio-seducing TV host in Don’t Look Up, and the CGI-contorting Hela in Thor: Ragnarok – and a performer suited to period pieces. Comfortable as a young Bob Dylan in I’m Not There and Katharine Hepburn in The Aviator, Blanchett inhabits Lilith as a classical femme fatale of the black-and-white era. “But normally the motivations of a femme fatale are in service of the plot, whereas I felt with Lilith there’s a higher purpose to it. Stan believes his lies, and my character is trying to unlock the truth in all its terrifying hideousness.”

Because I welcomed Blanchett “into my office” at the start of the phone call, the interview is littered with references as to how I’m the Lilith Ritter of our chat – until I describe Lilith’s voice as seductive and motherly. “Ooh, seductive and motherly,” she says. “Does that say more about you or me? Who’s on the couch now! Well, I think the room’s a psychic space as much as a physical office. It was important to have a voice that felt like it was inside Stan’s head, because he’s in such denial about who he is, what’s motivating him, and his ineptitude.” She also sought to create a hybrid between how people speak now and in the forties. “Hopefully the voice is timeless.”

In 2019, Stanley Kubrick’s assistant, Leon Vitali, revealed that Blanchett did uncredited voice work on Eyes Wide Shut. When Tom Cruise attends the orgy, the masked woman played by Abigail Good was overdubbed by Blanchett. “That happened after the fact,” she recalls. “I wasn’t allowed to see the film. It’s always a strange thing, when you’re asked to voice somebody else.”

So were Cruise and Nicole Kidman, who both recommended Blanchett, searching for someone vocally seductive (the character is nude) and motherly (she also rescues Cruise)? “They didn’t use the word ‘motherly’.” So just seductive? “Yeah. I mean, if you look at the sequence, it’s very strange and dreamlike and otherworldly – and a psychic space. Maybe that’s what they were after.”

In Britain, BAFTA longlisted Blanchett for Don’t Look Up; in America, SAG nominated her for Nightmare Alley. When I ask if there’s a cultural divide, she opts to skip the question and instead emphasise that Nightmare Alley is intended for the big screen. “It’s cinematic,” she continues. “There’s nothing like sitting with strangers in the dark, watching things. A master like Guillermo, having big, big, epic thoughts, in all of this glorious visual wonderment? It’s delicious.” Do people in the UK have a moral duty to see it in theatres? “A moral duty? Uh… OK, I’ll let you say that. That’s a good one.”

However, Blanchett describes Nightmare Alley, and its deconstruction of the American Dream, as a topical film, even if it’s set in the forties. “But it couldn’t be further from agitprop. It’s set in a circus and a world that feels familiar but strange. It provides us with a space, in an entertaining way, to reflect on what’s going on, without having it banged over our heads.”

So if it gets remade in 50 years’ time when the planet is underwater, will it still resonate? “Guillermo might be right for that remake – he’s good with underwater creatures. Look, you can’t view anything at the moment without reflecting on what we’re going through as a species. But this had been brewing for Guillermo and Kim for quite a long time. He’s really obsessed with how monstrous we’ve become when we start to believe our own lies. And that feels like an incredibly resonant theme to explore.”

The Pat Kenny Show

5 Minutes On – Cate Blanchett – “how we’ve lost the meaning of truth”

The Australian’s latest role as a psychoanalyst in Guillermo del Toro’s ‘Nightmare Alley’ has already secured her a nomination at next month’s Screen Actors Guild Awards. The film is a neo-noir psychological thriller set in the 1940s about a conman, played by Bradley Cooper, who starts believing his own lie. Cate Blanchett thinks it’s a theme that will resonate in today’s world, in which she says the truth has been politicised – and the confusion between fact and fiction has created a challenging environment for us all. For 5 Minutes On, she’s been talking to our entertainment correspondent, Colin Paterson, about the film, the future of cinema – and how during lockdown the only way she could engage her seven-year-old in home schooling was to dress up as her teacher and impersonate her voice.

 

BBC

Cate Blanchett on Her Double Oscar Buzz, Skipping ‘Ricardos’ and New Pedro Almodóvar Movie

Cate Blanchett delivers two outstanding performances that are both in the awards conversation this year: “Don’t Look Up” and “Nightmare Alley.” The star shepherds grace and a hypnotic trance that has the viewer hanging on every single word she releases.

With another impressive turn in Adam McKay’s “Don’t Look Up,” Blanchett is a contender in what is easily our strongest field of supporting actress contenders in the last 30 years. Blanchett was shortlisted at BAFTA for “Don’t Look Up,” and also picked up a SAG Award nod for Guillermo del Toro’s “Nightmare Alley.”

Variety’s Awards Circuit Podcast recently spoke with Blanchett about her double dip in the awards arena this season, and having to turn down the role of Lucille Ball in Aaron Sorkin’s “Being the Ricardos,” which ultimately went to Nicole Kidman. Plus, the Australian actor talks about her next project with Pedro Almodóvar and why she thinks it’s important to get back to movie theaters.

In what was reported exclusively on Variety, Blanchett will next work with Almodóvar on “A Manual for Cleaning Women,” his first English-language feature, which she will star in and also produce.

She also discusses her other upcoming movies like “TÁR” from Todd Field, “Pinocchio” from Guillermo del Toro and “Borderlands” from Eli Roth. Another possible project in the works is Francis Ford Coppola’s “Megalopolis,” which she’s been rumored to be circling alongside other stars such as Oscar Isaac and Zendaya. Isaac was said to be in discussions to play Desi Arnaz in Aaron Sorkin’s “Being the Ricardos” around the time that Blanchett was being eyed to play Lucille Ball.

“It became the movie it needed to be,” she says of what ultimately transpired with “Ricardos.” “Those things happen in the right way, at the right time. In the best possible way, you don’t always envisage the same thing; and then it goes on to become a different entity.” As for the possibility of working with Coppola she says, “When Francis calls, you just have to say yes. Because you’re on the epic, life-changing adventure ride. You’re on that roller coaster. I’m ready for that.”

“Don’t Look Up” is distributed by Netflix and is now streaming on the platform. “Nightmare Alley” is distributed by Searchlight Pictures and is now playing in theaters.

 — Variety

Sirius XM

 

Cate Blanchett in Pedro Almodóvar’s First English-Language Feature; & Nightmare Alley and Don’t Look Up Updates
Posted on
Jan 8, 2022

Cate Blanchett in Pedro Almodóvar’s First English-Language Feature; & Nightmare Alley and Don’t Look Up Updates

Happy weekend, Blanchetters!

Cate will produce and star in Pedro Almodóvar’s First English-Language Feature — A Manual for Cleaning Women. She also appeared on #FallonTonight last Wednesday to promote Nightmare Alley. We updated the FYC Campaign folder and uploaded the scans from latest issue of Total Film with a short interview with Cate. You can also check a behind the scene footage from the movie. The conversation with cast of Don’t Look Up is also out. Check them below. Beware of spoilers!

We would like to thank Susann for her donation to the site!

Cate Blanchett to Star in Pedro Almodóvar’s First English-Language Feature ‘A Manual for Cleaning Women’

Cate Blanchett has officially signed on to star in Pedro Almodóvar’s first English-language feature film, “A Manual for Cleaning Women.”

The film is an adaptation of Lucia Berlin’s short story collection of the same name, which includes 43 stories about women in multiple types of demanding jobs.

It was confirmed to Variety exclusively that the project is in the early stages of development, with Blanchett’s production company Dirty Films producing the feature for New Republic Pictures, in association with El Deseo. Andrew Upton and Coco Francini are producing alongside Blanchett for Dirty Films. Brian Oliver and Bradley Fischer are producing for New Republic Pictures alongside Almodóvar.

Almodóvar spoke with Variety for our “Up Next” series in December about the project, saying he was writing the script in Spanish before translating it to English.

FYC

Total Film – January 2022

The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon

Screencaptures

Screencaptures

Special behind-the-scenes look at powerful casting in Guillermo del Toro’s ‘Nightmare Alley’

Adam McKay + Cast In Conversation for Don’t Look Up

Source: Variety, ABC7

Cate Blanchett to lead ‘A Manual for Cleaning Women’ with script by Pedro Almodovar; Preview Interview from Portrait of An Artist; & TAR Updates
Posted on
Oct 2, 2021

Cate Blanchett to lead ‘A Manual for Cleaning Women’ with script by Pedro Almodovar; Preview Interview from Portrait of An Artist; & TAR Updates

Hi, everyone!

We’ve compiled recent news on Cate. We have a preview of Cate’s interview with Hugo Huerta Marin which was published on his book Portrait of An Artist. Cate is also circling the lead in A Manual for Cleaning Women which Pedro Almodovar wrote the screenplay. On TÁR related news, it has finished filming in Dresden, Germany and continues it in Berlin. Cate is also a signatory on a letter calling on Google, Amazon, Fox, Netflix, Disney & more to demand congress to support Biden’s climate plan.

Portrait of An Artist

Portrait of an Artist: Conversations with Trailblazing Creative Women by Hugo Huerta Marin is published by Prestel and is now available in the United States and will be out in the UK on October 5th, 2021. You can pre-order here.

Cate Blanchett leads the project ‘A Manual for Cleaning Women’ with a script by Pedro Almodóvar

This interview was Google translated, original interview in Spanish from El Pais is linked below.

“The actress [Cate Blanchett] loves the script and the shooting would be in English, but we no longer have the rights to the stories,” explains producer Agustín Almodóvar

Pedro Almodóvar premieres next Friday Parallel Mothers, the drama for which Penelope Cruz won the Volpi Cup at the last Venice Film Festival, “and he is already thinking about his next project,” as the producer and brother of the filmmaker told EL PAÍS, Agustín Almodóvar. “It has always been like this, as soon as I had finished a film I was already thinking about the next one,” he explains by phone. But it is not clear that it is a Manual for Cleaning Women, as was his initial plan before the pandemic, and of course before the short film The Human Voice, with Tilda Swinton, and Parallel Mothers, whose script wrote during confinement. As Agustín Almodóvar explains, “it is a question of rights and interests”.

Almodóvar adapted into a libretto – he has been with the project for three years – several of the 43 stories that make up the Manual for Cleaning Women, by Lucia Berlin, one of the books whose reading has most impressed him in recent years. The stories unfold between Texas, Oakland, and Mexico, in English and Spanish. “Two fifths of the script take place in Mexico,” recalls Almodóvar, the producer. “So it could be shot in Spain in locations in the Canary Islands, Andalusia…”. The script impressed who would have been its protagonist, Cate Blanchett. “Although the female character changes profession and sometimes physique, she is always, deep down, Lucia”, explains the producer. Handbook for cleaning ladies it would mark the filmmaker’s debut in a feature length in English, “after happily shooting the short with Tilda, although it is true that it was a small project carried out as a family,” says his brother. Almodóvar had already been offered projects to direct in the US, among them A Nun of Care or The Boy from the Newspaper, although they were commissions and he never felt that they came out organically from him. Julieta even wrote based on texts by Alice Munro for Meryl Streep, before deciding that the story would work much better in Spain and moved it from place and language, losing in the trip to the Hollywood star.

So what happened to Manual …? “The transfer of rights to the book is over,” explains the producer, who specifies his statements in a podcast from Castilla-La Mancha Media.” The script was done and Cate was excited about it.” But when the time came to definitively buy the adaptation rights, with what it involved an economic effort, and in doubt as to whether or not it would be shot, the Almodóvar production company El Deseo decided not to make the payment. “Now, Cate has decided to stick with him. He hasn’t bought the rights yet, he’s working on it, and he would do it with Pedro’s script ”. And then several possibilities would open up: from when the film is not made until it is directed by another director, or in the end by Pedro Almodóvar himself. “In international projects everything is uncertain”, recalls the producer. “If he goes ahead with another director, Pedro would appear as a scriptwriter and both he and I as co-producers”, with which they could even have a voice when choosing who directs the script. “The experience with Tilda was great, and Cate is the same kind of person. However, it is not at all clear that this is Pedro’s next shoot, ” his brother concludes.

CATE BLANCHETT RAVES ABOUT DRESDEN: “IT WAS A PLEASURE!”

The shooting of the film “TÁR” by director Todd Field, with Cate Blanchett in the role of conductor Lydia Tár, ended on Tuesday. Since September 16, the film had been shot in the Kulturpalast and, most recently, in the Palais in the Great Garden in Dresden .

Those involved in the film said goodbye with a lot of praise for the Saxon state capital and the Philharmonie.

“Thank you so much for welcoming us so warmly and generously to your impressive city,” said Blanchett enthusiastically. “It was a pleasure to work with his fantastic orchestra in the Kulturpalast.”

Director Field, who entered the city’s Golden Book during the recording, also spoke in the highest tones of Florence on the Elbe: “Dresden has a world-class orchestra and is a world-class city,” said the 57-year-old. “The Kulturpalast is a place for everyone: from small children who come here and look at picture books, to young adults who simply meet here or listen to music, to concert audiences. In the United States, I have never heard of anything like that. ”

As a special surprise, Todd Field had a letter from leading actress Cate Blanchett with him. She wrote to Mayor Dirk Hilbert: “Thank you for letting us be here in Dresden. You have a world class orchestra! I very much hope that I can come to Dresden again.

Dozens Of A-listers Calling On Google, Amazon, Fox, Netflix, Disney & More To Demand Congress Support Biden’s Climate Plan

As Democratic leadership tries to unite its progressive and moderate wings, a group of 80-plus artists, celebrities and activists called on the leaders of Google, Disney, Amazon, Fox, Facebook and more to urge Congress to support President Biden’s Biden’s Build Back Better plan.

Boldfaced signatories to the group letter included J.J. Abrams, Greg Berlanti, Cate Blanchett, Jack Antonoff, Don Cheadle, Ellen DeGeneres, Selena Gomez, Chris Evans, Jimmy Kimmel, Lady Gaga, John Legend, Chuck Lorre, Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Lin-Manuel Miranda, Sean Penn, Joaquin Phoenix, Billy Porter, Robert Redford, Ryan Reynolds, Shakira, Barbra Streisand, Wes Studi, Justin Timberlake, Kerry Washington and many more. The full list of names is below.

Dear Entertainment Industry Executives:

Climate change has arrived on our doorstep: California is on fire, record-breaking and deadly storms are flooding New York City, hurricanes are devastating the Gulf. This summer alone, nearly one in every three people in the United States experienced an extreme weather event.

Scientists warn that if we fail to act now, every single one of us will feel the impacts, a billion people will be displaced, and low-income people and communities of color will continue to be hit first and worst. Right now, we have a critical window of opportunity to do something about it. And we need all hands on deck to demand that our leaders protect the people we love and the places they live before it’s too late.

Congress has a once-in-a-generation opportunity to invest in a clean, just, and equitable future for all by passing the robust climate action that President Biden called for in his Build Back Better agenda. This legislation will create healthier communities, put millions to work in clean energy jobs, and free us from the fossil fuels that are driving climate change.

As the top leaders of the entertainment industry—one of the nation’s most powerful and influential business sectors—you are needed to lead our community’s call for action and embrace this vision for a better world. The entertainment community has a long, proud tradition of driving societal change. Our industry is already leading the charge toward more sustainable practices within our own businesses and productions. Now is the time to use your influence to shape our future.

Congress needs to hear you demand, unequivocally, that it put forward and pass the most ambitious climate change agenda in U.S. history.

The plan currently before Congress will protect people’s health and clean up our drinking water. It will create a just transition away from dirty fossil fuels and create millions of new jobs. It will protect communities from climate change through investments in clean energy, clean transportation, and infrastructure upgrades. And it will make sure we finally prioritize and invest in the low-income communities and communities of color that are hit hardest by both fossil fuel pollution and climate impacts.

This plan will create a stronger, brighter, and more just America—and we need you to help make this vision a reality.

At this pivotal moment, please lead the call. Demand publicly and loudly that our senators and representatives in Congress pass this critical legislation.

And we pledge to do our part as well. We will use our platforms to remind all Americans: Tell your senators and representatives in Congress that you demand climate action now. Advocate for Congress to take up the president’s climate agenda. And don’t stop there. Tweet. Post. E-mail. Call. Whatever it takes.

Sincerely,

J.J. Abrams
Anitta
Jack Antonoff
Troian Bellisario
Greg Berlanti
Cate Blanchett
Benny Blanco
Dave Burd aka “Lil Dicky”
Camila Cabello
Dove Cameron
Alessia Cara
Don Cheadle
Glenn Close
Coldplay
Jacob Collier
Lily Collins
James Corden
Ellen DeGeneres
Cara Delevingne
Leonardo DiCaprio
Zac Efron
Billie Eilish
Chris Evans
Jimmy Fallon
Finneas
Selena Gomez
Conan Gray
Grimes
Todrick Hall
Hugh Jackman
Jimmy Kimmel
Joey King
Liza Koshy
Lady Gaga
Cyndi Lauper
John Legend
Adam Levine
Kevin Liles
Dua Lipa
Lorde
Chuck Lorre
Julia Louis-Dreyfus
Demi Lovato
Ziggy Marley
Shawn Mendes
Idina Menzel
Lin-Manuel Miranda
Sean Penn
Joaquin Phoenix
Billy Porter
Zachary Quinto
Addison Rae
Robert Redford
Ryan Reynolds
Mark Ronson
Kyra Sedgwick
Shakira
Lilly Singh
Troye Sivan
Barbra Streisand
Wes Studi
Ryan Tedder
Justin Timberlake
Kerry Washington
Sigourney Weaver
Shailene Woodley
Calum Worthy

Source: El Pais, Tag24, Saechsische, Deadline